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  1. #1
    bi-winning
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    It only took me two rides...

    ...in the rain, to decide that I wanted to spend a few dollars and get some fenders, as I've decided to commute by bike rain or shine this summer.





    These happened to come with a nice reflective strip and mud flaps to boot. The 3M reflective material is dark in normal light, but reflects really well in night conditions. They are made by Axiom, a brand that Norco distributes here in Canada.
    Last edited by rkj__; 05-02-2009 at 05:44 PM.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  2. #2
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    I'd say you made the right call! The worst commute is better than the best day at work, I always say. Nice bike, BTW. Enjoy the ride!
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  3. #3
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    Fenders rule! I love em on my commuter.

    Nice commuter
    Stache 7 --- Rigid Surly 1x1 B+ --- Dirt Drop CrossCheck

  4. #4
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    Nice ride! I didn't know Rocky Mountain had aluminum disc ready cross bikes when I bought my Redline. We don't have a dealer around here anyway.

    Good move on the fenders. Full coverage is the only way to go. If you are planning on doing a lot of rain riding, you might want to start looking for deals on 700c disc wheels. A couple of seasons of rain commuting will trash your rims from all the grit. Not to mention...wet braking with cantilevers just plain bites.

    I'm running Bontrager Select Discs. They were pretty reasonable and seem to be holding up well.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tweezak
    If you are planning on doing a lot of rain riding, you might want to start looking for deals on 700c disc wheels. A couple of seasons of rain commuting will trash your rims from all the grit. Not to mention...wet braking with cantilevers just plain bites.

    I'm running Bontrager Select Discs. They were pretty reasonable and seem to be holding up well.
    I definitely don't expect my rims to last forever - I also do some cross racing, and trail riding on this bike - lots of mud. I've thought about discs, but I'm not planning to make the swap at the moment.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  6. #6
    veldrijder
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    Fenders do indeed rock. I bought a clip on type that only covers the rear this year, and while I would want full coverage for commuting, it has made training in wet conditions more pleasant, especially in the dirty conditions of spring with road salt, etc.

    How are the Axiom fenders as far as mounting hardware, etc? Any rattles/noise when riding? They look pretty good in the pictures, anyway

    Quote Originally Posted by Tweezak
    If you are planning on doing a lot of rain riding, you might want to start looking for deals on 700c disc wheels. A couple of seasons of rain commuting will trash your rims from all the grit. Not to mention...wet braking with cantilevers just plain bites.
    Cantis do as well or better than any other brake when set up properly. If your braking sucks in the wet but not dry conditions, pad material is to blame, not brake type. SwissStop GHP (Green High Performance) are the best I've used for wet conditions.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmoote

    How are the Axiom fenders as far as mounting hardware, etc? Any rattles/noise when riding? They look pretty good in the pictures, anyway
    It took me over half an hour to install these suckers. Lots of small parts to assemble. Nearly all of the nuts have the nylon locking insert. The disc mounts actually got in the way of the fender mounts, so instead of seeing them as an obstacle, I actually mounted to them on the left side of the bike. If you wish to run disc brakes, the fenders actually come with small adapter pieces to allow that.

    I expected them to make some noise, but they surprised me, and are actually quite quiet.

    Oh and jmoote, the brake pads you gave me are working out rather nicely. Thanks again for those.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  8. #8
    PM Me for Wood Fenders
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    Looks great. Commuters are made for fenders. If anyone is lacking a set, shoot me a line. I reclaim, reuse and recycle discarded wood and make some wood fenders that would rival those costing double.

    As far as Canti's...I love them. Cantis also proved for better fender mounting clearance. I also had issues braking in wet environments compared to dry. I switched to KoolStops dual compound. Havn't had an issue at all since
    The wood is being bent! Let me know what you need!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by rkj__
    ...in the rain, to decide that I wanted to spend a few dollars and get some fenders, as I've decided to commute by bike rain or shine this summer.





    These happened to come with a nice reflective strip and mud flaps to boot. The 3M reflective material is dark in normal light, but reflects really well in night conditions. They are made by Axiom, a brand that Norco distributes here in Canada.
    Question for you. The fenders are great in the rain, but what do you wear when you ride? I carry a laptop, and my backpack has a rain flap to pull over it, so that would probably be ok, but then do you wear a poncho or something?
    I need it up, you need it down. You don't see me complaining when you leave it down.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by paqman
    Question for you. The fenders are great in the rain, but what do you wear when you ride? I carry a laptop, and my backpack has a rain flap to pull over it, so that would probably be ok, but then do you wear a poncho or something?
    Depends on the temperature of course.



    If it is chilly, full finger gloves, cycling cap, rain jacket, tights, and shoe covers.

    Medium temperatures get cutoff gloves, cycling cap, rain jacket, shorts.

    I suppose if it were really hot, I might just choose to get wet, and toss the rain jacket aside.



    So far, I have been really happy with the fenders. They are especially awesome on days when the roads are wet, and it is not raining. They really help to keep my feet dryer, as the water does not splash off my downtube and into my shoes. They also keep the mess off of me when passing through construction zones.

    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by rkj__
    Depends on the temperature of course.



    If it is chilly, full finger gloves, cycling cap, rain jacket, tights, and shoe covers.

    Medium temperatures get cutoff gloves, cycling cap, rain jacket, shorts.

    I suppose if it were really hot, I might just choose to get wet, and toss the rain jacket aside.



    So far, I have been really happy with the fenders. They are especially awesome on days when the roads are wet, and it is not raining. They really help to keep my feet dryer, as the water does not splash off my downtube and into my shoes. They also keep the mess off of me when passing through construction zones.

    Yeah, that is a bit much for me to wear to work only to have to lug it home in my bag on the way home. I think I'll stick to fair weather riding!
    I need it up, you need it down. You don't see me complaining when you leave it down.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by paqman
    Yeah, that is a bit much for me to wear to work only to have to lug it home in my bag on the way home. I think I'll stick to fair weather riding!
    I keep my work clothes and shoes at work, so that really cuts down on what I need to carry.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by rkj__
    I keep my work clothes and shoes at work, so that really cuts down on what I need to carry.
    Yeah, I keep my shoes at work, but I don't really work in an environment where I can wear the same thing every day. I suppose I could leave a pair of jeans there, and just bring them home on the weekends. I've thought about doing that in the past, just haven't done it yet. Plus I often have to carry my laptop home.
    I need it up, you need it down. You don't see me complaining when you leave it down.

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