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Thread: Old Trek

  1. #1
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    Old Trek

    I have an old Trek Mountain Track 800 from around '96 or '97. I just got a new Gary Fisher but I'd still like to use the Trek for roving around town. It's all stock and most of the components are just about worn to death. What would you put on the bike component wise, and would this bike even work for a commuter type use?

  2. #2
    No-Brakes Cougar
    Reputation: Gary the No-Trash Cougar's Avatar
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    This would definitely work as a commuter, as long as the frame does not have any major damage (I commute on a ancient 850 Mountain Track myself). First off, what exactly is worn out on it? If your cassette is shark-toothed and/or chainrings are shot, derailleurs, etc... and you don't have a lot of serious climbing then you might save yourself some money and hassle by converting it to single speed. And unless a brake arm or two is damaged, some new brake cables and pads should take care of the brake department. Do you plan on commuting in inclement weather? Might want to pick up some fenders. Plan on commuting before sunrise or after sunset? Definitely pick up a light set. Depending on how you want to carry your stuff, ou might want to pick up some kind of seat or handlebar bag or even a rack and panniers. I prefer to carry stuff in a backpack, some people prefer messenger bags, to each his own. Maybe a spare tube/patch kit and some tools?
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  3. #3
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    I was thinking about going single speed, I just wasn't sure what I would have to get to convert it myself. The brakes, I think, are good, the wires are definitely shot. I might get some fenders and I usually just carry stuff in a backpack. I know I'll get some slicks to put on there too, pricepoint has a few cheap ones.

    Mostly I need clarification on how to/what to get to go single speed.

  4. #4
    Which way? Uphill.
    Reputation: nepbug's Avatar
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    Pick yourself up one of the kits, most of the major online retailers offer them.
    http://www.performancebike.com/bikes..._1031512_-1___

    Then just run one of the chainrings you currently have. Once you've got a better idea of what ratios you want you can buy a SS ring in the correct size.

    Also, check your chain to see if it needs replacement. Unless you end up with 1/8" chain specific chainrings or cogs you can run any size chain on a SS, I usually run an 8 or 9 speed chain, depending on what's on sale.
    Blog

    Just keep spinning. Just keep running. Just keep paddling.
    Just keep moving forward.

  5. #5
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    I just finished fixing up an old Mountain Track 800 for my girlfriend to commute on. I just painted the frame, added a new saddle, new city tires/tubes, new V-brakes, some old Shimano levers, a new chain and some used GripShift shifters. It's very basic but it works great.

  6. #6
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Subaru_Nation555
    I just finished fixing up an old Mountain Track 800 for my girlfriend to commute on. I just painted the frame, added a new saddle, new city tires/tubes, new V-brakes, some old Shimano levers, a new chain and some used GripShift shifters. It's very basic but it works great.
    Not surprising. Rigid mtbs are simple, cheap (usually), super versatile. Perfect for a lot of stuff, close enough for almost anything.

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