Old murray for commuter- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: henry9419's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    459

    Old murray for commuter

    I found an old murray street bike out on the curb the other night, so i picked it up since i dont have a proper street bike, im currenttly thinking about setting it up with sone newer components, cleaning, tuneup and a rear rack and using it as a commuter for work
    2009 Jamis Trail X2
    2002 Raleigh Mountain Scout
    2008 Trek fuel ex7

  2. #2
    CB of the East
    Reputation: bedwards1000's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    3,993
    I'm not sure you have a proper street bike now. The only Murrys I've known have been cheap department store junk that's really not worth upgrading. Pics?

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: henry9419's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    459
    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    I'm not sure you have a proper street bike now. The only Murrys I've known have been cheap department store junk that's really not worth upgrading. Pics?
    By proper i mean dropbars, skinny tires, lightweight

    I know its a department store bike thats why im not gonnaput anything expensive on it, im just gonna use it as a beater to ride to work and wherever, i dont have any good pics now, ill get some later though
    2009 Jamis Trail X2
    2002 Raleigh Mountain Scout
    2008 Trek fuel ex7

  4. #4
    CB of the East
    Reputation: bedwards1000's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    3,993
    Quote Originally Posted by henry9419 View Post
    By proper i mean dropbars, skinny tires, lightweight
    2 out of 3 ain't bad.

    I don't mean to be too negative on a free bike but some of those department store bikes are real dogs. Spending $100 to put new tires, chain, brake pads and fix a few things would be too much. They are also usually all pretty small.

  5. #5
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    Hmmm... I don`t know it for a fact, but I wouldn`t be surprised if OLD Murray were something like OLD Schwinn.
    ie: no lightweight by any stretch of the imagination, but well functioning parts and built to last a lifetime.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: henry9419's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    459
    Chain im prob just gonna soak in pb blaster, only thing i might splurge on would be doubletap brake/shift levers used from ebay/cl and new tires $100 into a free bike isnt bad, tho I would prefer that in my ss build
    2009 Jamis Trail X2
    2002 Raleigh Mountain Scout
    2008 Trek fuel ex7

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    11,381
    we are going to need photos of this bike before we can weigh in on whether it's worth riding at all, or if there is a good reason it was in the trash. please get some of those to us. chances are, it's probably not even good enough to RELIABLY get you where you're going every day. if it's the kind of junk I think it is, it's going to be a pain to ride and difficult to maintain, but more importantly, it will not make it to your destination as a functioning bicycle most of the time.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BrianMc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,415
    If it is heavy and before you spend money on it, if you have a bicycle recycle co-op near you, it might be traded in for minimal cost to get a classic cromo framed road bike that fits you and needs little. Just an idea. I got a very suitable Peugeot for $45.

    BrianMc

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: henry9419's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    459
    Well it needs tires soon, brake levers and the front shifter, and other then tgat just a tuneup, derailleurs, at least the rear, work fine
    2009 Jamis Trail X2
    2002 Raleigh Mountain Scout
    2008 Trek fuel ex7

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: canyoneagle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    271
    I'd say put a couple of pics up. The Murrays of the 70's and 80's were a step below the Sears Free Spirit bikes and Huffy's (or at leest a peer to the Huffy line). Stamped dropouts, horrible cables, one piece crank, thin brake calipers, etc. If this describes the bike it is honestly not worth the $10 a new chain would cost, not to mention tires, brake pads, cables....

    Not worth refurbishing IMO.

    I've seen many mid-range (better) bikes in the dumpster that would actually be worth a little effort. If it were a schwinn varsity, then it would be okay to refurb, but on the cheap.

    I totally get the fun of a freebie project, but would recommend moving on. It's probably worth $5 if it is similar to the ones I remember from those days.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: henry9419's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    459














    Im gonna see if i can have it rideable for totally free if possible
    2009 Jamis Trail X2
    2002 Raleigh Mountain Scout
    2008 Trek fuel ex7

  12. #12
    Flow like water
    Reputation: DavyRay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    711
    Quote Originally Posted by henry9419 View Post
    Im gonna see if i can have it rideable for totally free if possible
    Totally free sounds good. Your signature shows that you have some good bikes. You will quickly, I think, decide what this Murray is worth to you. Good luck.

    I really would not spend the money on new tires until I checked out the entire bike. For example, those brakes are okay as long as you are going slow enough to stop the bike by dragging your feet.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: canyoneagle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    271
    The pics really help.
    The bike looks to be better than total trash - alloy rims, 3 piece crank (even if steel). It's still a very low end bike and not worthy of any investment IMO.
    It looks like a fun project to at least refurb it for free (as you suggest), and it might be good to donate it to a homeless shelter.
    You've got some nice bikes in your stable, so I'm not sure why you'd want the murray other than for the experience of tinkering.

    Good luck with it, and send some "after" pics if you tackle it.
    Last edited by canyoneagle; 04-21-2012 at 10:33 AM.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: henry9419's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    459
    Yea before i took it i looked it over, if it had been total trash I would have left it, its mostly for a fun project and experience, once the ss raleigh is done ill use that for riding around town as a playbike, the trailx2 for sone rides abs the trek for most, which is actually what ive been riding around town since its got tge fastest rolling tires on it atm, and the murray will be a beater/commuter til i get my hand on sonething better...i gotta post some more pics if my shop, i just have to finish putting up the pegboard, and get some more tools, and eventually ill build a better bench
    2009 Jamis Trail X2
    2002 Raleigh Mountain Scout
    2008 Trek fuel ex7

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: canyoneagle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    271
    Quote Originally Posted by henry9419 View Post
    Yea before i took it i looked it over, if it had been total trash I would have left it, its mostly for a fun project and experience, once the ss raleigh is done ill use that for riding around town as a playbike, the trailx2 for sone rides abs the trek for most, which is actually what ive been riding around town since its got tge fastest rolling tires on it atm, and the murray will be a beater/commuter til i get my hand on sonething better...i gotta post some more pics if my shop, i just have to finish putting up the pegboard, and get some more tools, and eventually ill build a better bench
    Awesome.
    I cut my teeth in the 70's on refurbishing neighbor's bikes, and most were similar to your project. It gave me a great start on my mechanical skills, and there was something oddly satisfying about taking a dusty, dry, neglected cheapo bicycle and making it ride better than new with freshly re-packed bearings, rebuilt brakes and derailleurs, cleaned and lubed cables and housing. At most I'd put new tires (and cables in extreme cases), but only if the owners agreed to the cost.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: henry9419's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    459
    Quote Originally Posted by canyoneagle View Post
    Awesome.
    I cut my teeth in the 70's on refurbishing neighbor's bikes, and most were similar to your project. It gave me a great start on my mechanical skills, and there was something oddly satisfying about taking a dusty, dry, neglected cheapo bicycle and making it ride better than new with freshly re-packed bearings, rebuilt brakes and derailleurs, cleaned and lubed cables and housing. At most I'd put new tires (and cables in extreme cases), but only if the owners agreed to the cost.
    Today or tonight ill start pulling it apart more and then ill see how bad it really is

    On a side note im gonna pull the firs and third chainrings off the raleigh to ss it and ran into an issue...i cant figure out how the crank seperates from them, and on the other side of the allen bolts holding them together are these things with no allen or screw head to hold them with and idfk how to seperate them now

    2009 Jamis Trail X2
    2002 Raleigh Mountain Scout
    2008 Trek fuel ex7

  17. #17
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    Quote Originally Posted by henry9419 View Post
    i cant figure out how the crank seperates from them, and on the other side of the allen bolts holding them together are these things with no allen or screw head to hold them with and idfk how to seperate them now
    They`re rivets. The only way to separate them is drill them out or grind flat and knock them out with a punch.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: henry9419's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    459
    So why are they allens on one side? How does the crank attach to the rings? I cant quite figure that out either
    2009 Jamis Trail X2
    2002 Raleigh Mountain Scout
    2008 Trek fuel ex7

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    11,381
    they are made to appear like regular cranks. or they are bolted together and then smashed into that shape.

    I think this would be a good SS conversion bike. that can be as simple as removing the derailleurs and shortening the chain, but you can take it a lot farther than that with little or no budget. see if there is a bike co-op nearby that can help you find donor parts for a few bucks.

  20. #20
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    18,453
    The Murray's not worth spending money on, and you shouldn't ride it anywhere you need to go on time. In the pics, I'm seeing a ton of stamped sheet metal parts, which aren't going to work very well for you, and a cottered crank, which even a modest cyclist can destroy. The bottom bracket looks like a type that was only ever used on very cheap bikes, and they're pretty awful BBs - they're unsealed, and the size prevents you from using something better. So you're stuck with it. Is that a crack on the driveside rear dropout?

    I think it's worth whatever you can get for it by weight at the recycling center.

    Lately, I think that the lowest COO way to have a reliable geared commuter is a mid-90s bike. Something with an 8-speed cassette. You get excellent interoperability with contemporary road bikes - basically everything but the headset is the same, and everything is readily available and in current production. This is about a $300 bike, depending on the specifics and what bikes cost in your area. A road bike will be a lot more efficient, but for commuting in a city, I don't think it makes much of a difference.

    If you're worried about theft, a mid-80s road bike from a more serious brand for about $100 is the way to go, I think. I found that I ended up spending a lot of extra time and money keeping those things rolling, so now I'm riding a 2005 bike that I bought for a lot more money, but I'm expecting better reliability and fewer mechanical problems.

    Or just ride one of your hardtails.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: henry9419's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    459
    Ill see what happens, a hartail is a good possibility as I would prob bend street rims fast with my riding a hardtail mtn or cross bike is prob the more logical choice for me
    2009 Jamis Trail X2
    2002 Raleigh Mountain Scout
    2008 Trek fuel ex7

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    11,381
    i'll be frank about it: there was a good reason this bike was in the trash. recycle the metal and put the buck or two you get for it toward spare parts for your bike. I have worked in bike shops for the past few years and volunteer at a bike co-op. even at the co-op, i would not bother trying to fix that bike if it costs me nothing.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    2,503
    I would tend to agree. When bikes are aplenty in the summer months, anything that takes more than a quick lube and tighten gets thrown on the trash heap.

    If you have your heart set on it though, give it a whirl. I have a Varsity that is a 35 pound beast, but a blast to ride.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.