Nuke Proof carbon fork for commuting- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Nuke Proof carbon fork for commuting

    Does anyone have any experience with the Nuke Proof carbon fork for commuting? I've read mixed reviews on it but they are mostly relating to using it while mountainbiking. Apparently for Clyde's (like myself - i'm about 210 lbs) they are a bit weak - would this be an issue if i'm only on the road. I don't want to faceplant on ashphalt becuase my fork failed!

    BTW i'm putting it on my old mtb - an Australian version 2008 Giant Rincon, if that makes any difference etc
    2011 Kona Dr. Dew
    2010 Giant Trance X2
    2008 Giant Rincon

  2. #2
    No-Brakes Cougar
    Reputation: Gary the No-Trash Cougar's Avatar
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    I don't know if "Carbon Fiber" and "Nuke Proof" really go together, but you might look into eXotic forks. They seem pretty reasonably priced as carbon goes. If you're running fat tires or you don't mind the harshness of a narrow tire, eXotic also has aluminum forks that are almost as light as their carbon forks at half the price.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary the No-Trash Cougar
    I don't know if "Carbon Fiber" and "Nuke Proof" really go together, but you might look into eXotic forks. They seem pretty reasonably priced as carbon goes. If you're running fat tires or you don't mind the harshness of a narrow tire, eXotic also has aluminum forks that are almost as light as their carbon forks at half the price.
    So the Nuke Proof forks are bad quality? I'll have a look at the other forks you mentioned. I'm leaning more towards carbon because i've put 1.6 inch slicks running at 75psi on the bike and want some sort of ride quality - the current Suntour 'suspension' fork that is on the bike is not really providing anything at the moment
    2011 Kona Dr. Dew
    2010 Giant Trance X2
    2008 Giant Rincon

  4. #4
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    you may also want to look at the civia forks. they're carbon and look EXTREMELY beefy. not sure if they're suspension corrected or anything like that but might be worth looking at.

  5. #5
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beenee98
    So the Nuke Proof forks are bad quality? I'll have a look at the other forks you mentioned. I'm leaning more towards carbon because i've put 1.6 inch slicks running at 75psi on the bike and want some sort of ride quality - the current Suntour 'suspension' fork that is on the bike is not really providing anything at the moment
    I'm sorry, I didn't realize that Nuke Proof was a brand and I guess I totally mis-read your post. I'm still not familiar with them, but they look OK. The Civias look like they might be 700c only and non-suspension corrected, but if the axle to crown matches that on your old suspension fork then it still might work!
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  6. #6
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    As far as this discussion goes, if you are riding roads and occasionally taking hops up curbs, any carbon fork will be fine. I assume you will look for fender eyelets and something with ~400 mm a-c length. Most cross carbon fiber forks will work for you, as they will have plenty of clearance. Personally, I'd just get a dimension mtb fork- eyelets, disc and inexpensive. I like mine on my mountain bike well.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the responses guys. I hadn't even thought of going steel which might be more cost effective. In terms of bump compliance, would i notice a huge difference between a carbon and CroMoly fork?
    2011 Kona Dr. Dew
    2010 Giant Trance X2
    2008 Giant Rincon

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by beenee98
    Thanks for the responses guys. I hadn't even thought of going steel which might be more cost effective. In terms of bump compliance, would i notice a huge difference between a carbon and CroMoly fork?
    Really depends on fork design and construction (applies to both steel and carbon). Both steel and carbon can be designed to be stiff, better for handling; or compliant for better comfort.

    That said, of the two road forks I ride, I find steel noticeably more compliant than carbon fork. Both of mine are the more traditional curved raked design. The steel fork rides much more comfortably over bumps. However, I feel much more confident with my noticeably stiffer carbon fork when going down long fast twisty descents; and the carbon is still plenty comfortable for long rides of 50+ mi.
    I'm gravity challenged, adrenaline deficient, and looking for that endorphine high. Shout out, I'll move out of the way. :-)

  9. #9
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    I don't think there is a huge difference in fork feel from steel to carbon as much as I think there is from fork quality and design. I like my steel forks because they are inexpensive and work great for commuting and very well for singletrack. Carbon might be substantially lighter, and a lot of people like them very much.

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