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Thread: New Frame

  1. #1
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    New Frame

    Looking for a new frame as a commuter. Right now I'm using my old Bianchi Mtn bike but the frame is too small. I'd also like to have disc brakes etc. Still want to run 26" wheels and rigid front fork. Single Chainring and 10 spd rear

    I've looked at the Surly Troll and like the 2011 Orange color but can't seem to find a frame to fit my 6'1 self. I think I'd need a 20" model and can only find the 16" and 18"

    I've also seen the sette reken which looks ok

    Looking at Ebay Carbon frames also

    I've been scouring craigslist also for mtn bikes but haven't found anything that strikes my interest.

    What other options are out there? Not looking to break the bank

  2. #2
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    How do you want it to fit?

    Nashbar tends to have frames for around $100. On-One and Vassago have some that people like too. bikeman.com often has some cooler frames, although that's moving up in price.

    One of the pitfalls (or advantages, depending on your perspective) of a lot of the cut-rate frames is that they have short top tubes by size.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  3. #3
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    Want it to be comfy but does not have to be a cruiser or townie comfy. Just looking for something that I can jump curbs commuting, take off pavement some if I want, hook up a trailer and tow the kid around the park etc. I've already got the wheels and like the look of 26" wheels with more of a road tire

    Just looking for something fun to goof around on

  4. #4
    Natural Born Killer
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    My commuter is built on a '99 Spec. steel Rockhopper frame with mostly hand-me-down parts from my mountain bike. Works great for me and I don't have to worry too much about it. Bought the frame and a bunch of parts for $35 from a member on a local MTB forum. So that option is always a good start. I also built up an On-One Inbred as my main mountain bike this spring. It's a great steel frame that won't break the bank and can easily be run single or multispeed.
    Quote Originally Posted by Skrufryder View Post
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  5. #5
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I'm not feeling enough like "that guy" to quote myself, so I'm going to give you some background for my question.

    I commute to work by bike too, and I also ride as a sport. Commuting especially, I get to see lots and lots of people with bizarre riding postures and poor bike selections. People sitting bolt upright, something that often requires a fair amount of modification to the cockpit. People riding a bike that's a few sizes too big, sometimes down in the drops the whole time. Etc.

    If I don't get my bike fit into a relatively small "strike zone," it really murders my back on the efforts. "Making a bike fit" isn't great because it makes a bike handle like ass when the fore/aft distribution is off, although it's a lot easier to just comment on the stem size. Otherwise, you could just stick a 140 mm stem on your bike and call it a day.

    I think someone who's in shape and pedals consistently is best served by current XC geometry on a flat bar bike - it'll give you enough space not to feel cramped when you're leaning forward to balance pedal forces.

    People who are out of shape or coast a lot may truly be better served by bikes with short top tubes.

    So, do you want it to be comfy for coasting a lot and JRA, or do you want it to be comfy for riding with constant pedaling and a little more attack? It's two fairly different ideas, and if you're doing a new frame anyway, you'll have an easier time dialing in your fit if you start from a frame that matches your style.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  6. #6
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    Sorry, could have given more detail

    I'm in shape and pedal. Road Bike and Triathlon specifically. I've got 3k+ miles on my bikes this year and haven't commuted once.

    I'm just itching to build a bike, I could ride my road bike to work easily. I'll verify size but my 2010 Look 566 is a Large I believe (56cm in their sizing) in an aggressive riding position and my tri bike is also pretty aggressive

  7. #7
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    The Surly frames are nice because they're versatile. I don't have one, but looked hard at them, maybe something for the future.

    I also looked at the Sette Reken, it's a nice frame, but it lacks any commuter bits such as fender and rack attachment points.

    Nashbar has a decent looking aluminum frame, too: Nashbar Double-butted Aluminum Mountain Bike Frame - Mountain Bike Frames
    Performance has the same frame in white, a few dollars more right now, but they seem to alternate sales: Ascent Aluminum Mountain Bike Frame - Mountain Bike Frames
    '94 RSBikes Stampede (commuter), '05 Prophet, '09 Scattante XRL Team, '10 Slice 4
    Retired: 97 C-DaleSuper-V, 05 C-Dale R5000

  8. #8
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    I'll echo nemhed:



    Last winter I had an itch for a project bike, so I got this for $30 (I think it's an '89 kuwahara), and then built it up with stuff I had on hand. No disks, but the big slicks make it a blast for just goofing around on.

    You could do something similar with a Troll, but if you can find an old mtb (and you can live with v-brakes or cantis) then you could put it all together for under $100.

  9. #9
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Figure out the reach you wish you had on your current bike. If you measure it like effective top tube length but all the way forward to where your stem clamp is (so, to the handlebars) and knock off about 90 mm, you'll have the top tube length you want in a mountain bike. Look at the size charts for the different frames and see what you think. My suspicion is you'll find you want to up-size some to get the right reach on bikes like the Surly. I was going to say that about the Sette too, but I glanced at the geometry chart before shooting my mouth off, and that's good because it turns out that it's got a reasonably long reach - actually a skosh longer than usual in my size. Not that any of this stuff is standard.

    Also think about if you want other amenities. I like having a rack and fenders on my commuter, for example. The eyelets are convenient to have if you're planning to mount any of this stuff. I can't say I can tell, looking at the picture of the Sette, and they don't say anything about it one way or the other.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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