New Commuter!- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: New Commuter!

  1. #1

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    52

    New Commuter!

    Hello all, I am soon to be a new commuter and have a few questions for you more expirenced riders.

    I recently bought a Iron horse Warrior 3.0 Mountain bike from Performance bike. I have put on a good 40-50 miles the last few days. The riding around here is mostly on a nice paved bike path with a few off-road trails here and there.

    I am thinking about a 9 mile ride to work and was wondering if this ride on a mountain bike is nuts? (I am 5'10" 230lbs but soon hope to get back down to 200ish). The ride is a pretty nice stright shot on the bike path with a few killer hills but I made the ride on my day off in about 1 hour 30 minutes.

    Is there a way to make my mountin bike more "ride to work friendly"?

    I am planning on driving one day a week and leaving a weeks worth of clothes at work however, I am worried about the cool off and how to "refresh" once you get yourself to work. I am worried I will feel sweaty and dingy all day.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    269
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe-Joe
    Hello all, I am soon to be a new commuter and have a few questions for you more expirenced riders.

    I recently bought a Iron horse Warrior 3.0 Mountain bike from Performance bike. I have put on a good 40-50 miles the last few days. The riding around here is mostly on a nice paved bike path with a few off-road trails here and there.

    I am thinking about a 9 mile ride to work and was wondering if this ride on a mountain bike is nuts? (I am 5'10" 230lbs but soon hope to get back down to 200ish). The ride is a pretty nice stright shot on the bike path with a few killer hills but I made the ride on my day off in about 1 hour 30 minutes.

    Is there a way to make my mountin bike more "ride to work friendly"?

    I am planning on driving one day a week and leaving a weeks worth of clothes at work however, I am worried about the cool off and how to "refresh" once you get yourself to work. I am worried I will feel sweaty and dingy all day.
    Good wheelset that climb hill rapidly and smooth rolling for less pedalling effort. Btw,Is yr workplace air condition? If is, just get yrself cool off and swoop a new clothes. U will be feel refreshing all day. The first week, u may feel tired and aching. After that, u will feel healthy and more alert. Best of all, get enough sleep for yr everyday ride!

  3. #3
    Outrageously happy
    Reputation: Roeland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    71
    Is that the Performance Bike Shop on Hamilton in Campbell?

    Best way to keep cool and to stick with it, is to take your time. Don't push it, yet, until you gain more experience. Also, be sure to drink plenty before, during and after the 9 mile ride. Hopefully your workplace has showers and/or changing facilities.

    For equipment, I suggest saddlebags, aka panniers if you are a Euro-snob!

  4. #4

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    52
    I do have A/C at work but no shower facilities. Does anyone make a similar ride? How to you clean up after your ride into work before you switch clothes? I know once June-July hit I can see high temps of 80-85 degrees with high humidity in the mornings.

  5. #5
    bi-winning
    Reputation: rkj__'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,108
    Quote Originally Posted by shimano4
    Good wheelset that climb hill rapidly and smooth rolling for less pedalling effort. Btw,Is yr workplace air condition? If is, just get yrself cool off and swoop a new clothes. U will be feel refreshing all day. The first week, u may feel tired and aching. After that, u will feel healthy and more alert. Best of all, get enough sleep for yr everyday ride!
    ^^^Please post using words from the English dictionary.

    To the original poster; a mountain bike is not the best tool for the job, but it definitely can be used. The best thing you can do to make your bike more road/path friendly, is to change the tires to some narrower slicks.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  6. #6
    BIG and Bald
    Reputation: FireBallKY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    399
    As far as "freshening up" just make sure you're clean or shower before you head out. After all, it's only clean sweat.

    Give yourself 10-15 minutes to start cooling down once you've arrived and then dry off completely before you change into your work clothes. And if you still feel icky like you're a piece of rotting meat ...A quick stroke of deodorant, a shot of body spray (Axe, OldSpice) and you're good to go.

    As someone mentioned, you might be kicking your butt during the first week wondering what in the heck are you doing but it will soon be worth it. Co-workers may harrass you for a short time but eventually they'll start respecting you for it or at least that was the case with me. GOOD LUCK!!!
    "Don't neever gave up..."

  7. #7
    MTT
    MTT is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    171
    I have to agree with rkj, if you had a road bike with 700x23 slicks at 120psi, you would not work half as hard as with your mountain bike. You will be amazed at the difference, but you will have to slap the old card down. What ever tire you get, max out the PSI, and that will help you put less energy into the road.

    Is there a gym walking distance to where you work? Does the company help pay for commuting and/or gym fees? Some companies do; it is worth asking no?

  8. #8
    LCI #1853
    Reputation: PscyclePath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    328
    Joe:

    My commute involves about a mile of singletrack on the "short cut" to the office, so I've been using my Fisher 29er for the commutes over the past several months. The biggest thing I've found is that since its a F/S bike, there's no good way to add a decent rack to haul stuff. I bought a hybrid commuter this past week and have been really happy with it, but to summarize your question, a mountain bike can make an excellent commuter choice once you work out a few issues like the kind of roads/streets you'll be on and how to carry whatever stuff you may need with you.

    Here's a reference that's helped me a great deal, and I use as a reference for the LAB's bike commuting classes and seminars that I do from time to time: http://www.roadbikerider.com/commuters.htm

    Tom

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.