New Bike Time- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: New Bike Time

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    63

    New Bike Time

    So I think it is about new bike time. I am looking for a commuter/ faster touring type bike and have narrowed my choices down to either the Surly Pacer or Salsa Casseroll and was wondering what peoples thoughts were when comparing the two.

    Thanks, John

  2. #2
    Bedwards Of The West
    Reputation: CommuterBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    5,451
    You are obviously in need of a Nashbar X frame.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,136
    You can't go wrong with either bike, but the Surly wins because of aesthetics - the Salsa Casseroll is UGLY.

    But if you really plan on loading it down or doing any touring, I'd go with the Salsa Maya instead.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    63
    im not really planning on doing any kind of heavy loaded touring but the ability to be able to carry my books for school and a change of clothes in a basket instead of on my back would be nice. Does anyone have any input on the quality of ride on the pacer. I have a vintage Peugeot that I ride from time to time and there is just something about the way it soaks up the bumps in the road that I fell in live with and am trying to recreate in a bike that would fit me a little better.

  5. #5
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    I haven`t ridde either, but both of those bikes have caught my attention at one time or another. Either would be great for commuting and weekend rides. Casseroll is ugly? No, it isn`t- just the stupid staight legged forks they put under it are ugly
    Of course, neither of them compare with a vintage ride like your old Peugot when it comes to COOL. I doubt you`d be sorry with the Salsa or with the Soma, but if you really like your old Frenchie, don`t forget the possibility of replacing it with a better fitting oldie.
    Recalculating....

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    63
    I'm always on the lookout for a deal on a vintage lugged steel road bike but they seem to be in vouge right now and I can't see spending rediculus amounts for a forty year old non modern part compatible bike.

  7. #7
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    Quote Originally Posted by john_boy
    I'm always on the lookout for a deal on a vintage lugged steel road bike but they seem to be in vouge right now and I can't see spending rediculus amounts for a forty year old non modern part compatible bike.
    I can`t disagree completely. Real steals are hard to come by these days, but good buys are still out there. It depends on your preferences- if you really want an older bike, you can still get great performance for under $500. Somebody who doesn`t care much about the vintage aspect will probably get the best value from a modern used bike- lighter weight, tighter gearing, same styling as "the guys" for the same $500.

    For what it`s worth, compatibility isn`t a big issue for most bikes from the 1970s up. Aside from used and NOS "bling" parts, you can still get currently manufactured "plenty good" freewheels in 5,6 and 7 speed, friction shifters, indexed shifters for eight and 9 speed and quill stems or 25,4 mm bars. Add a new wheel set or relace your rear to a modern freehub and anything goes. The two exceptions to that are for long gone drivetrains (Hurret, Simplex, Mavic) or for some European BBs.

    I`m not trying to convince you to go vintage, just making sure you realize that it`s still a viable option and not dificult and that the stuff you seem to be concerned about isn`t worth stressing over. If you like the look of the oldies, go for it. If you want every last drop of performance or you prefer that your bike looks like the next guy,s (and there`s nothing wrong with that), stick with the newer stuff. Or even brand new,
    Recalculating....

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    63
    yeah I have to agree that if I could find an old bike to recycle I would prefer to do that, but I seem to be striking out a lot lately trying to find one. What exactly did you have in mind when you said modern used. Ive not been into biking that long so im not too sure what to look for in something that is not a current model.
    Thanks, John

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    63
    keep in mind that steel is a must for me.

  10. #10
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    Modern used? What`s to not understand? Both the bikes you mentioned in your OP are nice mid level steel "sport" geometry triples that have been out a few years and have been making their owners happy. If you find one of those models a few years old, it`ll be priced a lot less than new. Other bikes that fit the same description include Jamis Satelite. Bianchi Imola, Soma Smoothie (frameset only, although I think the Pacer is only frameset too), and Kona Honky Tonk (except I don`t think it`s available from the factory with a triple). If you don`t mind canti brakes, you can get options for fatter tires by including Jamis Aurora, Bianch Volpe, Novara Randonee, maybe even a Jake. Some mfgs have pretty much gone away from steel, but it`s still alive and well for all those brands above.
    Recalculating....

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.