Never gonna use Slime tubes ever again!- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Never gonna use Slime tubes ever again!

    On my main commuter I have used Slime tubes for the peace of mind. It has saved me a couple of times and gotten me home after a puncture by sharp stuff on the road.

    A while back I noticed that my front wheel (Sun Rhyno Lite with XT hub) had a broken spoke at the nipple, which actually sheared off. I got that fixed and didn't think much of it. Then less than a month later another broken spoke at the nipple. I thought I might have accidentally hit the spoke when opening the metal gate at work. But it was sort of unlikely.

    I didn't want to pay the shop $30 again, so tried to repair it myself. After I took off the tire and rim strip, I looked closely at the spokes. Turns out when the Slime tube punctured it leaked the green slime on the rim before it sealed. The slime got into all the nipple crevices and over time corroded and weakened the brass nipples.

    Grrrrrrrrr. I didn't want to deal with cleaning all the nipple and possibly respoking the wheel, so I ended getting a new front wheel and using a regular tube. My rear wheel still has a Slime tube, but it's holding up. Plan to change it at some point. I really like the Rhyno Lites on my commuter since I'm running V-brakes in the rear and disk up front. Plus they're beefy and sometimes I load my rear rack with groceries. I hope the rear doesn't have green crust on the inside of the rim!

    Sent from my C6916 using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    since 4/10/2009
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    yeah, I coulda told you those tubes were bad news a long time ago. most shops where I have worked charge people extra if they have a flat with one 'cause they're a mess. and they don't work THAT well considering all their drawbacks.

  3. #3
    I'd rather be on my bike
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    yeah, I coulda told you those tubes were bad news a long time ago. most shops where I have worked charge people extra if they have a flat with one 'cause they're a mess. and they don't work THAT well considering all their drawbacks.
    I am pretty sure that we do this as well. This is especially true if you forget to tell us, and we find out the hard way.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  4. #4
    CB of the East
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    I use the Nashbar self sealing tubes in the 2 bikes that I ride in the worst weather. I figure messy hands in the warmth of my own home is better than changing a tire in freezing rain by the side of the road.

    I'm surprised to hear that it is corrosive especially to brass or stainless. You could just put a layer of gorilla tape as a rim strip as if you were doing a tubeless conversion and then the slime couldn't get to the nipples.

  5. #5
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    I dont really understand all the complaints - Everybody is excited about going tubeless, doesnt it cause the same mess when there is a leak?

    I use the German version of Mr Tuffy tireliner - works pretty well for me, if you can live with the extra weight.

  6. #6
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    Stans stays in the rim, and off the nipples. Unless you screw something up. Tubeless is pretty hassle free, as long as you use real tubeless stuff.

    The slime tubes are notoriously sluggish too. Tubeless has very marginal gains over the lowest resistance tubes.

  7. #7
    CB of the East
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    I had to go and Jinx myself. After years with no flat on the rain bike I open my big fat mouth here about how good self sealing tubes are and ppfffsssss. I ran over a piece of glass that cut the tire and tube. After struggling with a particularly tight tire rim combination in the cold rain with the dirtiest numb hands possible I finally got the bead off and it dawned on me that I should try to let it seal itself so I pried the tire back on the rim and pumped it up with the hole down. Success! No hissing, firm tire. I rode about a mile and it was flat again. OK, that is just the sealant working to fill the hole. After 2-3 more attempts I was getting pretty tired of that so I called my wife for a pickup. I could have thrown the spare tube in but I was planning on replacing the tire anyway and really didn't want to go through the effort.

    I got home and pumped the tire up to 80psi for fun. It held just fine but I didn't trust it so I took off the tire and tube and threw them both in the trash.

    Unfortunately I didn't have another self sealing tube because I would have used it if I did. I think they are fine for small punctures.

  8. #8
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    I tried these a few times because that was all that was available from the local department stores (and I did not know any better). I had quite a few of them malfunction at the valve stem. I guess the goo got into the stem and would not allow it to seal up again after trying to inflate it. I ended up tossing a few of them after removing the core a few times and trying to get it cleaned up enough to seal again.

  9. #9
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclingdutchman View Post
    I dont really understand all the complaints - Everybody is excited about going tubeless, doesnt it cause the same mess when there is a leak?

    I use the German version of Mr Tuffy tireliner - works pretty well for me, if you can live with the extra weight.
    I love tubeless on my mtb. But my commuter bike just uses a simple tire and tube. Sometimes I have to change out a flat tube, but it's not a frequent thing. IME, quality tires are really worth it.

    Hell, if you want to go totally bombproof, you can do like the bike that I saw in the shop recently. I don't remember the frame, because the build is what struck me. Rohloff, belt drive, SON dynamo, solid rubber tires. I don't think you could have a more reliable commuter. I'll probably never see that bike in the shop again.

  10. #10
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    SOLID RUBBER TIRES?? That exists??

    OK I got the difference of slimed tubes vs tubeless now: Tubeless can not leak into the rim because the rimtape must be sealed airtight.

    Instead of Rohloff you might even consider a Pinion. Rohloff is very picky these days when it comes to spokes, lacing pattern, spoke tension and wheel truing. (See my thread in the IGH forum about broken flanges). My advice would be: When Rohloff, make sure to buy them new and to register them immediately to have warranty. Rohloff's Warranty and Service seems to be top notch.

    Besides that, riding a pinion makes it easier to swap wheels with different tires, if you want to have different wheel sets (e.g one for commuting, one for off-road riding).

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclingdutchman View Post
    SOLID RUBBER TIRES?? That exists??
    Everything old is new again. These were around when I was a kid. Literally that. Just a solid hoop of rubber. They were heavy as all get-out but (obviously) you could not flat in them.

    https://www.pinkbike.com/photo/14664691/

  12. #12
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    Solid tires will never flat but they ruin everything else that is good about bikes, I'd rather walk.

    Great for wheelbarrows though.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  13. #13
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    They do make it pretty tough to dial in tire pressure ...

  14. #14
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    Rohloffs and Pinion drives are cool and all...but single speeds are cheap.

    Single speed belt drive, cheap disc brakes, puncture resistant tires. I'm over 5k miles and I've only put air in the tires and changed brake pads for my daily commute. Wondering how long I can go before I have to replace something in the drivetrain.

  15. #15
    turtles make me hot
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    My Dahon folding bike that I commute on came with Schwalbe Marathon Supremes. I didn't realize how flat proof they were until the rear one wore out and I bought some 20" tire they in the store at the LBS. Got a flat the next day. I thought I'd beat the system and just go tubeless. It worked great until I inflated the tires to 60 psi and shot sealant all over the place through the hole that the sealant was closing up at 30 psi.
    I can't have that since some of my commute involves a ride on a train, thus the folder.
    I ended up going back to Schwalbe Marathon Supremes which they just stopped producing in 20". Now I have to try a different tire from them. I hope it rolls as fast and doesn't flat.
    Anyway, I had great luck with them in NYC if they still happen to make them in a size that fits your bike.
    I like turtles

  16. #16
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    Well, last week this happened.

    The Michelin Protek Cross tire with a mm of anti-puncture protection and the Slime tube were no match for this 2.5" screw.

    I know, I know, I said I was done with Slime tubes, but this was already on my rear tire and it hadn't shown any issues, and I really didn't want to change it anytime soon since the rear tire is a pain to change. Well, I guess this is a good time to rid the Slime tube and assess the rear rim for any corrosion at the nipples.

    Btw, I was less than a block away from home when this happened. 😀


    Sent from my C6916 using Tapatalk

  17. #17
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    ^^ Looks like a ribbed nail used for decking.

    At least it did not go through the rim. That can happen.

  18. #18
    sofa king awsm
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    Chuck Norris flatted a solid rubber tire. Then reinflated it.
    Baby, I want my face to be your quiver killer.

  19. #19
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    djork proved that even the best puncture protection is sometimes not enough. That said, there are many tires now that have belts that minimize the risk.
    Also, keeping your eyes open for road hazards is your best option. But when I have to choose between that and keeping my eye on that lady in the cage with the screaming kids, well, I can fix a flat. Can't fix dead. That's purty dang permanent.
    Eliminate all hazards and you ain't living.
    DAMN THE MUD, FULL SPEED AHEAD!!

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