The more it rains the more you ride- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    The more it rains the more you ride

    Here's an infographic on how much people use their bikes in several places round the world.
    Hardly a surprise to cyclists that more people will ride their bikes if it's easier and safer to do so.
    It's useful to have the data to back it up however.
    Please feel free to share.
    The more it rains the more you ride-ridingrain.jpg
    We Ride in the Rain ? Revanche bikes

  2. #2
    I'd rather be on my bike
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    The more it rains, the less I ride. If it is warm, yes, but when it is below 50F and raining, I don't ride.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  3. #3
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    you seem to miss the point.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by revanche View Post
    you seem to miss the point.
    That is excusable as your title for the thread is misleading. The chart shows there is no relationship between cycling and rainfall when based on different cities. Within a city, I suspect there is some degree of riding relationship to rain, with "fair weather" riders. The chart does show that infrasrtructure and driver attention can play a big role.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    The chart shows there is no relationship between cycling and rainfall when based on different cities.
    Sortof. The chart title mentions bike lanes, but the effort to include a bike lane metric in the chart itself is lame, as it's buried among other things like advocacy, bike share, and social acceptance. The chart looks simple, but buries a lot of confounding information that very well may mask trends where a series of charts or an infographic would be far more informative.

    I suspect a relationship WOULD appear if you controlled for the amount and quality of infrastructure without burying it among other harder-to-measure social issues. I see two "clusters" in the chart. The cities in the lower left, which are distributed fairly evenly and relationships are harder to tease out, and then the cities in the top right, where I DO see a relationship between number of rainy days and cycling mode share.

    It's also very European and North American-centric. Only one South American City, and it's not one I think of when I think about bikes in South America. Where are the Colombian cities like Bogota and Cordoba?
    Cycling Gains Ground on Latin American Streets
    https://matadornetwork.com/life/best...a-travel-bike/

    What about Asian cities? Some of these might be interesting cases where mode share may be high, yet specific infrastructure low. Probably good places to consider cultural acceptance issues, in particular.
    5 best biking cities in Asia | CNN Travel

    What about Africa? Cape Town appears on this list, even though it's old:
    15 of the world's most bike-friendly cities - CNN.com

    There are also some in Europe and North America that are conspicuously absent appear in lists like these. Even some cities in Australia and NZ.
    https://www.wired.com/2015/06/copenh...iendly-cities/
    The 50 Best Bike Cities of 2016 : 13: Indianapolis | Bicycling
    https://www.theguardian.com/cities/g...es-and-stories
    75 Most Bike Friendly Cities In The World | Biking Expert

    The chart is just a bit thin. Seems to me that it needs more data points. But then again, that would require more work.

  6. #6
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    We could argue the efficacy of any given chart on any given subject. The premise of people riding in the rain more when myriad circumstances exist isn't really important. The fact that people in the U.S. don't use bikes as transport can't be denied.
    That said, I like riding in the rain. Something peaceful about it. I don't have anything more than Frogg Toggs for rain wear. But I have fenders.
    DAMN THE MUD, FULL SPEED AHEAD!!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by OlMarin View Post
    The fact that people in the U.S. don't use bikes as transport can't be denied.

    That's no surprise, due to our car-based infrastructure it's impractical and downright dangerous to commute by bicycle in most areas in the US. Build it and they will come.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  8. #8
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    JB put it very well: people dont ride a bike if there is no infrastructure. And if nobody rides a bike, its not built either. Classic chicken&egg story. How to break that circle?

    I believe there was a thread here "we need to be mote like the dutch".

    I am an example that fits the chart: I always ride, also when it rains because the infrastructure allows me a 80-90% carfree or at least separated route. And I know there are parts in town where I definetely wouldnt want to ride everyday during rushhour due to poor infrastructure.

    We cyclists need a better lobby. But still, I think a very good bycicle lobby would still not be able to spend enough money to make politicians change their minds....

    Edit: here it is:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/commuting/we-...ch-933950.html

  9. #9
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    The thread title was meant to draw attention to the fact that there is almost no correlation between good weather and how much people ride their bike as a mode of transport.

    This goes contrary to popular belief.

    It's also contrary to most of our attitudes when we consider cycling a recreational activity.

    The most comprehensive metric we found to measure cycling infrastructure and advocacy (AKA bike-friendliness) was the Copenhagenize index.
    This was also a limit, as data for other cities was simply not available measured in the same way.

    The press regarding infrastructure and advocacy efforts is often more political effort, to justify spending and fish for votes, than a metric of results.
    I found this when looking through the data for the city I'm living in, Barcelona.

    So, again, we do need a better lobby, but the small sums involved to build a better bicycle infrastructure make it less appealing than the huge sums of money involved, as Cyclingduchtman, so rightly said.
    He also sums up the infographic, which is, people don't ride their bikes if there is no infrastructure.

    Infrastructure beats weather.

    And everything else for that matter.

    Ride safe.

  10. #10
    I'd rather be on my bike
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    I ride more when the weather is nice. There is no doubt in my mind. I ride more often, more miles, more everything. Remove the infrastructure from the equation. Nicer weather means more people riding. Most of the comments I get at work are in regards to the weather, not the infrastructure or traffic or darkness. Weather.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  11. #11
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    Its raining now. You make me want to ride to work now. Thanks

    Sent from my LG-H910 using Tapatalk

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    I ride more when the weather is nice. There is no doubt in my mind. I ride more often, more miles, more everything. Remove the infrastructure from the equation. Nicer weather means more people riding. Most of the comments I get at work are in regards to the weather, not the infrastructure or traffic or darkness. Weather.
    I definitely ride more when it's nice out too but I still think as far as commuting goes infrastructure and city planning are the main deterrents, and I think the reason most people don't comment about it is that it's a given (in the US) that it probably won't change, but the weather will.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by revanche View Post
    The thread title was meant to draw attention to the fact that there is almost no correlation between good weather and how much people ride their bike as a mode of transport.
    Except this is not exactly true. In fact, this statement defies intuition. I frankly do commute by bike less when the weather is poor, like many others. If you're going to make assessments about that, you can't compare places with generally mild temperatures, but lots of drizzly rainy days to places with more extreme weather like frequent thunderstorms, high winds, snow, subfreezing temps with ice and snow on the roads, etc without diving deeper into statistical analysis on those factors and counting people on bikes to tease out the degree to which each factor affects the number of bicycles on the road.

    Quote Originally Posted by revanche View Post
    The most comprehensive metric we found to measure cycling infrastructure and advocacy (AKA bike-friendliness) was the Copenhagenize index.
    This was also a limit, as data for other cities was simply not available measured in the same way.
    Yeah, if you're looking for already-calculated metrics, then you're going to run into a lot of limitations. My argument is to step back from other people's calculations if you're trying to make a specific point, and calculate your own that better illustrate the relationship you're trying to discuss.

    Quote Originally Posted by revanche View Post
    The press regarding infrastructure and advocacy efforts is often more political effort, to justify spending and fish for votes, than a metric of results.
    I found this when looking through the data for the city I'm living in, Barcelona.
    Yeah, when you're calculating something like this, you want to start with some raw numbers and build your analysis from those. Like, say, start by sourcing data that shows the distance of bike lanes, distance of separated cycle paths, and so on. Figure out a ratio of those facilities to road and highway distances for autos. That sort of ratio gives you an idea of the saturation of bike facilities in a city. Then chart that ratio with cyclist counts. Sure, some of those numbers can be difficult to find, especially the counts. But good analysis is rarely easy, and the data collection is almost always the hard part.

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