Mongoose Sabrosa 2007- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Mongoose Sabrosa 2007

    Hi!

    Among others, I have a Mongoose Sabrosa 3x9 bike... I'd like to renew it, change some parts to be a lighter and faster commuter and touring bike. What do You suggest?

    Specs:

    FRAME: Heat treated alloy 700C commuter, disc specific with eccentric bottom bracket
    FORK: Saso 7075 alloy legs, forged crown and dropouts with alloy steerer
    CRANKSET: Shimano 4428 Hollow Tech, 26/36/T steel, 48T alloy
    BOTTOM BRACKET: Shimano BB-ES25 Octalink
    PEDALS: Mongoose Alloy Platform
    FRONT DERAILLEUR: SR Suntour Duro-508
    REAR DERAILLEUR: SRAM SX-7.0 long cage
    SHIFTERS: SRAM SX-5.0 Impulse trigger
    FREEWHEEL: SRAM PG-950 11-28 9 speed
    CHAIN: KMC Z-9200
    RIMS: WTB SpeedDisc All Mountain 32 hole
    TIRES: Continental 700x47C City Contact with Safety System
    FRONT HUB: WTB Disc compatible Q/R 32H black finish
    REAR HUB: WTB cassette Disc compatible Q/R 32H black finish
    SPOKES: WTB stainless steel
    NIPPLES: Brass UCP
    FRONT BRAKE: Tektro Auriga Comp hydraulic disc, 160 mm rotor
    REAR BRAKE: Tektro Auriga Comp hydraulic disc, 160 mm rotor
    BRAKE LEVERS: Tektro Auriga Comp
    HANDLEBAR: Mongoose alloy flat bar, 25.4 mm
    STEM: Mongoose alloy 10 deg rise ahead
    GRIPS: Ergo comfort dual density
    HEADSET: Ritchey Logic Zero
    SADDLE: Mongoose / Velo dual density
    SEAT POST: M-logo alloy 350mm length 27.2 mm
    SEAT CLAMP: Alloy w/ Q/R
    EXTRAS: Bio-Tuned ergo bar end, stainless steel coffee thermos/cage
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Ovaries on the Outside
    Reputation: umarth's Avatar
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    32mm tires.

  3. #3
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    If you don't have a lot of climbing and/or gnarly headwinds in your area, you could go single speed. Then again, that might not be ideal if you also plan on touring. Other than that, I can't suggest anything to remove or change out. I can suggest some things to add though, like fenders and a rack. Maybe some skinnier tires as Umarth suggested, so you can squeeze some fenders in there. I would try to keep them as wide as possible though for extra comfort and load-carrying capacity.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  4. #4
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary the No-Trash Cougar
    If you don't have a lot of climbing and/or gnarly headwinds in your area, you could go single speed. Then again, that might not be ideal if you also plan on touring. Other than that, I can't suggest anything to remove or change out. I can suggest some things to add though, like fenders and a rack. Maybe some skinnier tires as Umarth suggested, so you can squeeze some fenders in there. I would try to keep them as wide as possible though for extra comfort and load-carrying capacity.
    Thanks!

    I use this bike mostly for long tours. I have this 47mm Continental City Contact for tours and a 28mm Continental Touring Plus for shorter rides, or when i ride without carrying package. I've already fenders and rack...

    On the other hand... I've an idea! Do You think it is possible to use this bike on hard terrain? I mean, across the Alps, for example. With package... Need to have a suspension fork? Or just a cross tire?

  5. #5
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    Light, fast and touring don`t usually go together. As long as the gears are low enough for you (I need lower gears for loaded touring), it`s pretty much a touring bike already, isn`t it? If you want faster for commuting or road rides, about the only thing that will make much difference is to put your 28mm tires on. Changing from flat to drop bars would probably give a fairly big speed increase, but involves a lot of parts and may not work with that geometry. You`d need new shifters, brakes and brake levers and probably a new stem and you still might not be able to make it comfortable. Maybe two bikes?

    Hard terrain? I have no idea how the roads or trails are across the Alps. I use a mountainbike with suspension fork for touring if it`s going to be all or mostly all offroad, but I`ve pedaled a lot of miles over bumpy dirt roads with 26X1.75 tires and a rigid fork. Try it on a short trip and see if it works for you- that`s the only way to know for sure.

  6. #6
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    Yeah, I would definitely go with at least a hardtail if the roads are going to be that bad. Though you could get away with just using your Conti City Contacts. Maybe a suspension seatpost like a Thudbuster?
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: drotos.toth's Avatar
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    Do You konw a good 28" suspension fork? I mean, light and durable enough for mixed terrain with heavy load... And what about a responsible cross tire?

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