looking for opinions on a couple things.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    looking for opinions on a couple things.

    so i recently got into commuting to work after my truck was down for a couple days and i didnt have a ride. now trucks fixed but i dont even wanna drive it because of the fun im having riding to work. after a week on my DH i picked up a nice little schwinn mtn bike to convert over, bikes a little older but pretty solid and cleaned up well. ive put some 26 1.5 tires on it and got there first use yesterday. after an hour of riding i had made it 16 miles. i think im at a decent starting point but would really like to improve at its 16 miles each way to work. so my questions are,

    my commute has a good number on long uphills in both directions so i was wondering the pros and cons of clip in petals to help with hill climbs, does anyone on here run them? i ride off curbs and jump into curbs regularly as im not a huge street riding person and also use every shortcut i can find.

    i am currently riding with my husky puppy in a backpack on my back, his head sticks out and he is totally content for the trip and we get a lot of waves and people taking pictures but everyday he feels a pound heavier is quickly outgrowing the bag (hes about 22 pounds now) so i have been looking into the bob trailers, i dont want to run a wide two wheeled trailer for this kind of commute and those seem to work for others with dogs, just wondering if anyones used them for everyday commuting/ how much extra strain it puts on you pedaling everything?

    the last thing i think might help me is drop bars, i have absolutely zero experience with them and cant tell if they would help me or now, i think the farther forward lean would be better for arrow dynamics. but not sure if its worth buying a set of bars just to try and see?

    any input is greatly appreciated

  2. #2
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Road bikes and mountain bikes have very different geometry partly to accommodate drop bars. You're going to run into trouble trying to put them on your mountain bike. If you're curious, test ride some road bikes.

    Are you riding in the city or the 'burbs? 16 mph is quite fast in town. Really, it takes a lot more work to go faster on uninterrupted roads too, though you'll get a little free speed if you switch to a road bike.

    Clipless pedals are overrated. I like them. But people talk about them like they're some kind of perpetual motion machine.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  3. #3
    since 4/10/2009
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    for the dog, teach that husky to bikejor! it's probably a bit early for your pup to be running with a bike, but you can get it started pulling small static objects and teaching it the commands.

    as for how to carry a pup, consider a trailer with an enclosure like a kid trailer (there are dog-specific models, too). last thing you want is for the dog to bail out suddenly. especially if it was leashed down.

    fitting drop bars to a mtb is possible, but can get funky with the geometry. if you do this, you have a lot of control interface issues to address. namely, brake pull, but also shifter cable pull. addressing those can be pretty complicated. You are probably better off with a bar end of some kind on a flat bar to keep things simple. There are "drop" style bar ends you can use, even, that allow you to keep your mtb style controls.

    lots of people ride clipless pedals. I rode them for about 13 years or so. I still have mine and will continue to use them when I feel like they'd be worthwhile. I have flats on all my bikes right now. Quality pinned flats. On my commuter I'm using Kona Wah Wah pedals I got as freebies last fall. On my mtb I'm using Blackspire Sub4's. Both are very grippy.

  4. #4
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    my house is located in what would be considered the burbs, i ride up and down large hill about 3 miles to the city, ride across the city a mostly flat and then its all up hill countryside to my work. i make the trip with very few stops along the way.


    my dog (timber) runs the trails with me 4-5 afternoons a week. he is great on the trails and very well trailed, i have no concern about him jumping out once he is properly antiquated with the set up. on longer mtn bike rides when he gets tired i set him on my top tube with his front paws on the handle bars and he stays put fine. i cant ride my style of riding with a two wheeled trailer, not even 100% sure how a single wheel trailer will do.

    glad to hear others that are running flat petals.

    here is a picture of my bike for frame comparison, i dont think drop bars would be very hard to do but i didnt think about all the connections with shifters/brakes, may keep the flats for a bit.

    also i havent done much for building my own wheels as i usually buy whole wheelsets for my mtn bikes so im a bit lost on how to figure out what hubs will work on this frame, id like to swap to at least disk brakes if not full hydrolic, thats all i run currently and these brakes do not feel safe to me


  5. #5
    since 4/10/2009
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    You cannot put disc brakes on that bike. Do not pass go. Drop bars will be a pain in the ass on it too. Everything uses old standards.

    Ride it for what it is.

    You are risking serious injury to your dog running it like that at less than a year old. Be very careful. If you injure a growth plate in the dog's bones it will be screwed for life. Talk to your vet about how much to exercise the dog at that age. My wife is a vet and we take it easy on our dogs until they are about a year old.

    Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Tapatalk

  6. #6
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    he only runs when he wants to i do not force him at all, we make frequent stops and give plenty of rest time. when mtn biking i do not cover a huge distance, its more getting out to a couple of different areas and building large drops or ladder bars. timbers ready to go for another hour after we have called it quits. i dont expect him to run for miles at this point and hes probably never running for more then ten minutes at a time.

    as far as disk brakes go why is that not doable? i should be able to get disk brake hubs lace them to these wheels and weld on the brackets to hold caliper no? seems pretty simple to me

  7. #7
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    ^^ The threaded fork won't take the brake force. The bottom of the fork below where the disc bracket would be attached, will bend or break. You can also force the wheel out of the fork if the dropouts are not vertical, but slant forward. Disc forks are 1 1/8" or larger, the head tube on that frame is for a smaller 1" threaded steerer. So you can't swap forks to get one strong enough for a disc. Dimension used to market a 1" unthreaded steerer steel disc fork, but threading the steerer would weaken it a lot. I did not find one with a quick google now. I considered one three years ago but went with a drum brake generator hub for the errand bike. Weight totaled about the same with the heavier fork and disc and Shimano generator hub versus the lighter fork and heavy drum braked hub. Sturmey Archer makes the 90 mm drum without the hub generator too. They are immune from snow ice and rain.

    The rear triangle would need a bar across the corner. There is an adapter:

    New MTB Bicycle Bike Rear Disc Brake Adapter Kit 170mm Blue | eBay

    Still seems a cobble job. So doable if you can get the fork, but not really worth the time and effort.

  8. #8
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Hey, if you can do the metal fab, all things are possible.

    I can't help thinking it would still be a really major project. If that's what you're really looking for, godspeed. I doubt you'll get the bike you want at the end, though.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  9. #9
    since 4/10/2009
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    I can't help but think it would require significant reinforcement. The fork being the bigger problem. Very much not worth it. If you can weld you might as well fab a whole frame. Probably less work.

    Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Tapatalk

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