Looking for a bike - internal gearing rear hub, disk brakes, 700c- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Looking for a bike - internal gearing rear hub, disk brakes, 700c

    Anyone know of any good ones available?

    I really have my heart set on the Charge Mixer, but they aren't available in the US yet.

    Not too picky on 3 or 8 speed rear hub, but disk brakes are a must. Looking for it to be more of a road/track style frame. Not MTB.

    Please point me in the right direction!
    Last edited by joshed; 09-10-2009 at 12:15 PM.

  2. #2
    Bedwards Of The West
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    Build your own! If you know what you want, why rely on someone else to share your vision? If someone does make it, it's probably not exactly what you want.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  3. #3
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    Here's a turn-key solution: http://www.rei.com/product/774422 but other than that, there isn't a whole lot of bikes on the market that fit that description. You'd probably have a better range of options if you do what CB suggested and build your own! Here is a recent example from this forum: http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=551600
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  4. #4
    weirdo
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    Or if you don`t want to do any building yourself, Redline Monocog 29 + prebuilt IG wheel from Harris. I don`t know what the MCs run any mmore, but you`d probably be pedalling with under a thousand Dollars invested.

  5. #5
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    I guess I am looking for more of a road/track than MTB frame.

  6. #6
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Do you need the frame to look road? When you say you want a road bike, do you mean a flat bar or a drop bar bike?

    If you're open to roller brakes, the Trek SoHo is a very similar product to the one you linked to.

    If you're interested more in the bike riding like a road bike than looking like one, you could start with a 26" singlespeed mountain bike frame and build it up with drop bars and the internal hub. You'd want to go down a size or two and you would likely want to use a rigid fork with a shorter axel-crown height than what the frame was spec'ed for.

    A company called "Dynamic Synergy" markets a road bike with sidepull brakes, drop bars and an internal hub. It has an integrated shift/brake lever made by Microshift to operate an 8-speed Shimano Alfine hub. So there's your shifting and drivetrain. You'd need to use Avid BB Road disc brakes to maintain compatibility with road levers.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  7. #7
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    I basically want a road bike with internal hub and non rim brakes because I am 210lbs and heavy braking is rough on the wheels.

    The SoHo S with the belt drive looks pretty appealing to me as well. Maybe get some drop bars on it and possibly the Microshift shift/brake levers.

    Would that work with the roller brakes? I have never even really heard of them before. Are they basically a heavier disk brake?

  8. #8
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    Giant Seek 1 is probably your best bet. Pretty decent specs. I spent two grand and got a great deal on most of the parts on my Alfine/disc bike and I didn't use super expensive parts.
    http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-US/...le/2345/32164/

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schmucker
    Giant Seek 1 is probably your best bet. Pretty decent specs. I spent two grand and got a great deal on most of the parts on my Alfine/disc bike and I didn't use super expensive parts.
    http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-US/...le/2345/32164/
    Nice one. Do you think it would be weird to put drop bars on that? would the frame geo bee to strange?

    I looked at the HA compared to their road bikes and it was only 1 degree off.

  10. #10
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by joshed
    Nice one. Do you think it would be weird to put drop bars on that? would the frame geo bee to strange?
    Not as wierd as drops AND flatbars.

    I have an mtb frame set up with drop bars- it does look a bit odd with such a rise in the stem, and if the top tube were any longer I wouldn`t have been able to manage, but in the end all worked out to be the most comfortable fit I have.. As long as you get a short enough TT, you should be able to get you bars up high enough. It gets trickier when you try to raise them and pull them back at the same time.
    BTW- that Seek looks like a good buy. I hadn`t heard of it before.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by joshed
    Nice one. Do you think it would be weird to put drop bars on that? would the frame geo bee to strange?

    I looked at the HA compared to their road bikes and it was only 1 degree off.
    You'll need a hi-rise stem. You'll also have to get the Jtek bar end shifter for the Alfine. Then you'll have to buy new brakes because it comes with hydraulics, which are not drop bar compatible. You should probably just put a high back sweep bar, like an J/Hbar or FUBar or something. Then you can reuse all the components.

  12. #12
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Quote Originally Posted by joshed
    Nice one. Do you think it would be weird to put drop bars on that? would the frame geo bee to strange?

    I looked at the HA compared to their road bikes and it was only 1 degree off.
    The length on the smallest Seek is 22.4" or 569mm. My road bike has a 545mm top tube. Granted, I'm not a very big guy, but I mention that because the smallest Seek is made for someone a little smaller than me and it's still longer than my road bike.

    Do you own a road bike right now? It would be helpful in figuring out frames suitable for drop-bar conversion if you already know your "Magic Number" or top tube length.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  13. #13
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    I am currently using a Surly Cross-Check for commuting. Its a 56cm.


    I would love to convert that frame into what I am looking for, but doing a disk brake conversion seems like a lot of hassle/work/expensive.

  14. #14
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    There are a few road or 'cross frames with disc tabs...but this is the one I'm using:

    http://www.nashbar.com/bikes//Produc...2_173397_-1___

    the nashbar "x" cyclocross frame. I'm running it with discs and 29er wheels. It has 135mm rear axle spacing, which I think (?) is what you want for internally geared hubs. Disc brakes are a direct bolt-on.

    I'm 200 lbs, and I commute on this every day, partly on dirt roads. Solid frame. I like it a lot. The price is right too.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  15. #15
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    @CB; pics please.

  16. #16
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by joshed
    I would love to convert that frame into what I am looking for, but doing a disk brake conversion seems like a lot of hassle/work/expensive.
    If it's just the braking performance that makes you unhappy, there's actually a lot you can do to improve your current bike. The cheapest would be to tune the cantilevers for better braking performance - by shortening or lengthening the straddle wire, you can mess with the amount of mechanical advantage in the system. The shortest straddle wire you can fit around your tires should give you the most force at the brake pad. Better brake pads can also help, especially with wet weather performance. I'm a big fan of Kool Stop salmon pads.

    If you can't make your cantilever brakes make you happy, you can also upgrade to V-brakes. They have more mechanical advantage, so you need brake levers with a longer cable pull, but since you aren't using integrated shifters, you can just buy a set of Tektro levers that do that. You can also get an adapter that lets you use your current brake levers, but I'm not a fan of adding additional parts to a bike when it's not necessary.

    If you decide that that's not happening, the small 1x1 has pretty close to your "magic number" for its top tube length, fairly roadish geometry, and the appropriate dropouts and tabs to use disc brakes. You may or may not notice slightly slower handling.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  17. #17
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  18. #18
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    i almost bought this one before i later decided to build my own!

    http://www.feltbicycles.com/USA/2010.../X-City-1.aspx

  19. #19
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I just read the spec on this one...

    http://www.konaworld.com/bike.cfm?content=drfine

    It would be a little problematic to do a drop bar conversion, which is kind of a bummer - the geometry reads as very "road" to me. It's got hydraulic discs, though, and until someone comes up with a drop bar lever that operates those, you'd have to get a new set of brakes too, not just change the cockpit.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  20. #20
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    run a mullet

    Quote Originally Posted by joshed
    I am currently using a Surly Cross-Check for commuting. Its a 56cm.


    I would love to convert that frame into what I am looking for, but doing a disk brake conversion seems like a lot of hassle/work/expensive.

    You'd have to change the fork to put discs on the front but keep the rim brakes in the back

  21. #21
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    also check out the new Specialized brand called Globe Bikes, 700 cc , internal gear,disc brakes, fenders plus city bike good looks.......sounds like it might be just what the doctor ordered

  22. #22
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    Charge Mixer availability

    The Charge Mixer will be available shortly and any dealer can order one through the distributor, BTI. I was at Interbike and got to see one and talk to someone from BTI. The bike looked great and I plan on getting one. Once I've downloaded the pictures from my camera, I'll post them.

  23. #23
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    I was looking for the same thing, but with more relaxed geometry than track.

    This bike will take an internally geared hub, 700cc wheels, and disk brakes. Comes in a drop bar or flat bar version. Pannier rack mounts too.
    http://www.cotic.co.uk/product/roadrat

  24. #24
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    done and done, you can do the Bryant Alfine

    http://www.civiacycles.com/civiacomplete_bryant.php

  25. #25
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    Bryant Alfine is a total bulls-eye. Belt drive = lower maintenance. Not available till spring though...

    Another option is a Norco Vesta - purchase an internal hub separately and have it laced to the rear wheel, put a Jtek bar end shifter on it.

    http://www.norco.com/bikes/urban/belt-drive/vesta/

  26. #26
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    Bryant does look good. How do you adjust the chain tension when using the Alfine?

  27. #27
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    It would need an EBB (eccentric bottom bracket) or sliding dropouts (like the Roadrat or Vesta)

  28. #28
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    The Brant looks to have a replaceable dropout system.
    I'd like to see that Alfine disc build.

  29. #29

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    Raleigh & Electra build some great bikes. I love the Electra Amsterdam has drum brakes but it isn't an internal hub. The Electra Townie has the 8 speed Nexus.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by pushinpixels
    It would need an EBB (eccentric bottom bracket) or sliding dropouts (like the Roadrat or Vesta)
    I haven't seen either one in varios photos of the Bryant.

    Scroll to the bottom of this page for a comment from a Civia rep:
    http://www.ecovelo.info/2009/08/07/f...-civia-bryant/

  31. #31
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    I haven't seen either one in varios photos of the Bryant.

    Scroll to the bottom of this page for a comment from a Civia rep:
    http://www.ecovelo.info/2009/08/07/f...-civia-bryant/
    There's 4 models of the Bryant. The geared versions will get vertical dropouts like the picture - the Alfine and SS versions will get sliding dropouts. The Civia rep said it won't be an EBB, that means it has to be a sliding dropout.

  32. #32
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Actually it looks like the Hyland with drop bars would be a pretty good option too. It's 20mm longer at each size than the Bryant, or about 15mm longer than your Cross Check. It's likely stiffer and lighter, since it's aluminum, but frame design has just as much to do with it as materials.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  33. #33
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    The 2010 Scott Sub 10 checks all of your boxes.

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