Light weight, high volume tires?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Light weight, high volume tires?

    Yay, another tire thread!

    I've got a "gravel" bike currently set up with 700x41 Surly Knards which make a good "ride on whatever" tire, but as it turns out I'm mostly on pavement with this bike. I've got the 33tpi version that are advertised at 650g, so not light at all.

    I'm hoping to shed some weight and rolling resistance (should be easy, right?) but would like to maintain some higher volume and some puncture protection would be preferable because I deal with a lot of debris.

    I can clear a 700x45 pretty easily, so something between 38-45 is what I'd like. I've got Soma Shikoro on my short list. Anything else I should be looking at?

  2. #2
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    Schwalbe g one (check which version suits you best)
    Conti speedride 42mm below 500gr with the socalled ProTection. Use them myself and they are good value for the money.

    In real life I always ride with a tire liner anyway, lightweight and punctureproof dont get along together.

  3. #3
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    Panaracer just released their Gravelking slick in 700x38. It's only like 320g and is tubeless if that's your thing.
    You change your own flats? Support your LBS and pay them to instead.

  4. #4
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    Thanks guys, I will look into those. I haven't tried road tubeless, but I do think my wheels are tubeless compatible so might be worth considering. This isn't my every day bike, I have heavy "puncture proof" tires on my daily ride.

  5. #5
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    Compass 700C x 44 Snoqualmie Pass

    https://www.compasscycle.com/shop/co...oqualmie-pass/


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  6. #6
    Wierdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    I rode the actual Snoqualmie Pass last year on 28c conti gatorskins. There was nothing supple about them. I might have to check out this tire

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Volsung View Post
    Panaracer just released their Gravelking slick in 700x38. It's only like 320g and is tubeless if that's your thing.
    Mine were closer to 350g and are measuring just over 40mm on 22.5mm rims. I like them. Running tubeless no problems.

  8. #8
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    These Kenda Flintridge tires came on my bike and I really like them. Roll well on pavement but still have grip for gravel. https://bicycle.kendatire.com/media/...spec_sheet.pdf

  9. #9
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    I want to build a light weight set of wheels that i'll be able to use for am and run them on high volume tires . Is this a good idea? Can somebody recomend Tutuapp9appsShowbox rims and tires? Where i ride isnt that rocky and its relatively smooth
    Last edited by klimbo13; 08-01-2018 at 02:11 PM.

  10. #10
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    I have used Big Apples, Super Motos, Big Ones, and G-One Speeds all in 29x2.35 (700x60) and now I have Compass Antelope Pass in 700x55.
    I went to eh Big Ones to see if they were faster than the Super Motos and so I could go tubless. When the rear wore out sealant would start weeping through so I replaced it with a G-One Speed. I finished last summer with that combo and was happy.

    This spring I got another G-One to replace the remaining Big One. I was having flats every other day and the tubeless sealant would not seal as the punctures would rip open. These flats were caused by chunks of safety glass from car crashes rather than broken bottle glass, or thorns or rocks. I started putting radial tire patches on the tire itself and that worked, but was annoying.

    I have had the Antelope pass tires for a month now with no punctures even though I got the ultralight version. They are fast for sure. I swapped wheelsets with a friend and ran the Big Apples for a few days. Typically when we ride together it ends up being an easy day for me. That day I had to work to keep up with him. So the Big Apples are slower than the compass pass.

    I still suspect my G-One experience this spring was a fluke and am tempted to try them again. Perhaps lowering the pressure to 40 instead of 50 would help.

    Also, if it matters, I was using i29 rims on all of these. last week I switched to i35 and they seem to work well with the 700x55 tires.

    I can't see myself going to smaller tires.

  11. #11
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    Going to smaller tires is tough for me too. I'm on 700x48 Somas and they're great, but I want a new fork and I may run into clearance issues.

  12. #12
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    Bigger tires, YES! (sorry to the OP, I see your frame limits you <50mm)

    I find the G one speed (2.35) too easy for punctures and traction marginall (at best)l. so run the all rounder version up front, (2.25). fast tire.

    run "em tubeless 30/32 with 26MM IW

    BTW, an equivalent size BA is almost a killo. I bet you felt that additional mass

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by klimbo13 View Post
    I want to build a light weight set of wheels that i'll be able to use for am and run them on high volume tires . Is this a good idea? Can somebody recomend rims and tires? Where i ride isnt that rocky and its relatively smooth
    9Apps Vidmate Cartoon HD
    What sized tyre do you want to run? There are heaps of variations and combinations out there and knowing what sized tyre you want to run will narrow the rim options available to you. Also, lightweight and wide rims normally don't go hand in hand. Where you gain in one area you generally loose in the other, eg wider generally means heavier, eg Sun Ringle MTX 39(30mm internal width) 850g, vs Sun Ringle MTX 33(26mm internal width) 660g to give just 2 examples.

    Would be good if you could define the specs of the combination you are looking at?

    My suggestion, from the description of the type of riding you do and where you ride, would be a standard, mid weight rim, 450g-520g, 22-25mm internal width with a 2.3"-2.6" tyre would suit your needs.

    Good luck

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by milliesand View Post
    Bigger tires, YES! (sorry to the OP, I see your frame limits you <50mm)

    I find the G one speed (2.35) too easy for punctures and traction marginall (at best)l. so run the all rounder version up front, (2.25). fast tire.

    run "em tubeless 30/32 with 26MM IW

    BTW, an equivalent size BA is almost a killo. I bet you felt that additional mass
    I did not notice the extra mass of the BAs that much. I wasn't any slower and my heart rate wasn't any higher.

    This spring I am using the G-Ones again. At 40-45psi I had a few flats. I dropped to 30-35PSI and have had no flats. I want to believe that makes the difference, but my son just got a flat at 30PSI with Extraterrestrials, so maybe not.

  15. #15
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    Over a year now on G-one speeds and no flats, fast as road race tires, and big cornering grip. Tubeless at 40psi give or take.

    But damnit they wear out quick for $85 tires.

    It's like my commuting bike has some kind of expensive performance-enhancing drug habit.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  16. #16
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    Ghettocruiser you are right but Schwalbe is honest about that wear - the G-one comes in several versions, maybe a more "allround" version would be better for you?

    And when you are on pavement, the supreme does a pretty good job too. I have those on the CX bike and a collegue of mine is commuting 8m each way on the 559-50 version and he likes them a lot too.

  17. #17
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    ^^^ True, but I'll suck it up.

    If these things had come out in 2013-2014 when I was doing 10K miles a year, I'd have bankrupted myself. Since I'm down to half that, I can live with the cost for now.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

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