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Thread: Light Lane

  1. #1
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    Light Lane

    Pretty damn slick.


  2. #2
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    I guess I'd be interested in a study that shows how that is beneficial. I just don't see motorists caring.

  3. #3
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    Saw this about a year ago, I think. The idea is to get more distance/respect from drivers of passing cars.

    My issue with it is that IMHO it is more important to get the drivers of those cars to see you in the first place and at greater distances so they aren't moving over at the last minute and acting as a rolling screen for the driver behind. Most drivers are so happy you aren't riding Ninja that they extend a bit more courtesy. Drivers 'don't see' emergency vehicles with flashers, so you won't get through to every driver, but you want that comment to condemn their driving, not your lack of conspicuity.

    It is interesting that the red/orange top the cyclist is wearing is too dark to show well, a yellow-green dayglo color preferably with reflective bands like an ANSI vest would be cheaper and provide more visual punch at longer distances than this device. Makes me wonder if they tried a more visible clothing and it dominated the device for effect in videos.

    The road lanes here are not 12' or more for the most part.. By the law that did not quite pass but rules in other states, the cyclist is "keeping right" with 3 feeet to the curb, and the motorist is not suppossed to get closer than 3 feet, plus 2 foot of my shoulder width is eight foot or almost the entire lane. Which means I ride the inside of the track that right wheels normally go, or right down the center when I really want them left of the center liine when they pass. With all the lights I have, only dolts who have to prove they dominate the road come anywhere close to me at night. The cut back in too soon is the biggest hazard. Day is bettter too, though there are more drivers who don't know where the right side of their vehicle is.

    It also does no good to confuse drivers about what you are or to make them overly curious. I voted with my money and spent in on more/better normal lights and visible clothing. Super nerdy, but I think it looks better on me thatn a casket.

  4. #4
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    Agreed. I think a high mounted flashing light with reflective stuff/bright clothing seems to work best. I just thought this was kinda neato - I guess I'm glad the commuter innovations keep coming, which is good.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dion
    Agreed. I think a high mounted flashing light with reflective stuff/bright clothing seems to work best. I just thought this was kinda neato - I guess I'm glad the commuter innovations keep coming, which is good.
    Let's make an innovation that starts at the top....

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    Quote Originally Posted by umarth
    I guess I'd be interested in a study that shows how that is beneficial. I just don't see motorists caring.
    What's the purpose of those lines in the road with a bicycle painted between them?

    While bike lanes and a moving laser line will not stop a drunk/texting driver, I personally do not like being buzzed by cars. I think this light would back drivers over a little more.
    Last edited by sanjuro; 10-08-2010 at 11:40 AM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro
    What's the purpose of those lines in the road with a bicycle painted between them?

    While bike lanes and a moving laser line will stop a drunk/texting driver, I personally do not like being buzzed by cars. I think this light would back drivers over a little more.
    There is a big difference between a long, continuous white light that designates the edge of the road and two thin green lights. Lights are lights. I get buzzed in the bike lane from time to time. No motorist is going to look at those lights and have a clue, unless they bike themselves, and one hopes they would give you the room in any case.

    As much as cars cause problems, those problems are institutionalized to a large degree. Commuters are screwed until those problems get logical consideration (um, so never) or enough people start bike commuting.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro
    I think this light would back drivers over a little more.
    I feel the thought/innovation is in the right direction. All commuters have are deterrents - nothing more. Until somebody invents a force field, lights, reflective material, lanes, bells, noise makers, etc is all we have. Unless you can go clear across town without mixing it up with cars, I welcome any and all considerations for safety.

    BITD, somebody decided it was a good idea to put a protective covering on their head while operating things that go fast.

  9. #9
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    Darn, I thought it WAS a force field.

  10. #10
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    It is good that people are thinking about the safetly of cyclists. I just try to help friends and neighbors (and their friends and neighbors) to not screw up and hit me. The completely inattentive and incompetent I hope to spot and avoid. The best piece of safely equipment we have is between our ears and hopefully protected with a helmet preferably one with lights or at least reflective devices.

  11. #11
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    Just mount a big pointy metal stick out the left side on the back of your bike, such that when a motorist invades your 3' buffer, their car gets gouged big time.
    Donít frail and blow if youíre going to Braille and Flow.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker
    Just mount a big pointy metal stick out the left side on the back of your bike, such that when a motorist invades your 3' buffer, their car gets gouged big time.
    Or you go highside when a steel bumper pushes your backend out.

  13. #13
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    It was a better idea when it had the bike lane icon in the middle. Wonder why they got rid of it?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro
    Or you go highside when a steel bumper pushes your backend out.
    I actually ride a Surly Big Dummy, so I have no worries here. Cargobike + fully-loaded = obstacle.
    Donít frail and blow if youíre going to Braille and Flow.

  15. #15
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    I get lots of respect with my errand bike and wide panniers: it is 28" wide. I sit very uppright so am maybe 6' 6" from pavement to the top of the helmet with the whole broad back of the ANSI vest in plain sight.

    I also get a lot of respect at night with lights. The new lights are bright enough to be seen VERY well in the day and the ANSI vest have helped them see me in time to tell that I am travelling a lot faster than 5 mph.

    Utility marking flags stuck out to the left off a rear rack help driver use the side and not the center of mass to judge distance. The sharp pointy object was a tempting thought at one point in time.

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