Leg bands, anybody?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    Leg bands, anybody?

    Just wondering....
    I only have two pairs of long pants that I ride in and I`ve slightly modified both by putting a little tack stitch near the hem of the right leg to help keep things in control. That was al I needed on my previous commuter (single chainring and a little chain guard), but now I have a triple ring and derailler and for some reason my bottle cage wants to get in on the act, too. When "shorts weather" ran out, it didn`t take long to realize that my simple mod was no longer enough, so I started clipping a mini bungee around my ankle- it`s better, but I still catch the derailler if there`s a wind blowing from my right. And when the wind blows from my left, sometimes I snag the bottle cage with the other leg. Does anybody else ever snag a bottle cage, or am I just special? Anybody else using leg bands? On both sides? I think I`m going to have to look for pants that aren`t quite so loose- bummer, especially when I need long johns under them. I guess the bright side is that I`ll be more aero on the bottom half even though my jackets and vest are still billowing in the wind
    Recalculating....

  2. #2
    The Brutally Handsome
    Reputation: Sizzler's Avatar
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    Tuck em in your sock and your problems will be over! I've used a strap / leg band but I've found they don't really work because some material will always be hanging out the other side which is all your chainring needs to take your pant-leg for a ride. Your problems might also have to do with the tread of your crankset. Is it a mountain or road triple?

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fancy Hat's Avatar
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    I use a metal clip. It's faster than the strap and I can hang it on the handle bars when I run into a store. I make sure to pull the extra pant leg material to the outside of my leg, so any extra slack is away from the gears. I only worry about the drive side.

    I have had pant legs catch a water bottle cage, but usually only when I roll them.

  4. #4
    Double-metric mtb man
    Reputation: Psycho Mike's Avatar
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    I run sweats as my outter leg layer in the winter and have found that a leg band or gaiter/winter over-shell normally is all it takes to control them.
    As if four times wasn't enough-> Psycho Mike's 2013 Ride to Conquer Cancer Page

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  5. #5
    bi-winning
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    I tuck my pant legs into my socks. Works for me.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  6. #6
    Ovaries on the Outside
    Reputation: umarth's Avatar
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    I cuff my pants. Works better than the other options, as when someone calls you a dork for cycling, you throw them a gang sign.

  7. #7
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
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    I like the velcro leg bands that are also nice shiny reflectors. I wear them on both legs for visibility. They have light-up ones too, but the one I had was wired too wimpy & died.

  8. #8
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    If I only wear my thin pants without long johns I do fine tucking the leg into my sock, but with long johns or with the thicker pants it really stretches out the socks. These days, it`s usually both the thick pants and the long johns. I`ll try turning them up and a strap/bungee combo- never heard of turning them begore, but it sounds reasonable. If that does it, I`ll order some of those reflective straps- they look like a good idea. Then if I still have problems I guess it`s time to replace my wardrobe.

    Sizzler, I think you`re right about the width of my gearing- just a matter of what to do about it. My crankset is an in between triple (24/36/46). I`ve never gotten caught in the chain, but it still makes for a big derailler sticking out there.
    Recalculating....

  9. #9
    dirtbag
    Reputation: ranier's Avatar
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    I've used one of those velcro hi-vis bands to secure my jeans/pants on my commute but I always misplaced them or lost them. Rolling the legs to knicker length is the way to go.
    Amolan

  10. #10
    a lazy pedaler
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    Once I've changed I use my booties to hold the pants near the chainring...is like the socks thing though.

  11. #11

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    i have a pair of velcro straps that i've used before. it's more of a hassle than anything. I've tucked the pant legs into a pair of shoe covers/booties before, but I prefer them rolled up to just below the knee. The only part I don't care for is if I stand up for any reason, the cuff can get some chain grease/dirt/junk on it. It's never gotten caught up on anything though, more just brushing the side of the chainring. when seated it's all good.

  12. #12
    Bedwards Of The West
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    Rodar, I knew you were older than most of the guys on here simply based on your command of the English language... but now that I know you're out there riding in bell bottoms it's all becoming clear. Just take a couple of the leather straps out of your braids and use them, hippie.
    Last edited by CommuterBoy; 01-26-2010 at 02:50 PM.
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  13. #13
    I'm SUCH a square....
    Reputation: bigpedaler's Avatar
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    I have a package of small bungee's that have been sized for my ankles. Slightly loose on the ankle during the day, hold the cuff perfectly while riding. Since I commute to work in my work clothes, and the jeans are a bit baggy, I strap both legs. I also fold the excess to the outside.

    Socks are under the winter-weight tights this time of year, and when I don't have to wear THEM under the jeans, I wear ankle socks. So socks are a no-go for me.

    Tip; sitting comfortably in a chair, with the pant legs hiked up just enough to take tension out of the fabric, is where they need to be for comfortable riding. Strap 'em then and there.

  14. #14
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    The jury is still out, but roling AND strapping with the little bungees seems to be working better. When I think about it, maybe the "rolling" suggestion meant to roll them way up, higher than where they interfere, but I`m just turning a little cuff to stiffen them a little.

    Dang it , CommuterBoy- if I take the straps out of my braids, I`ll just move the problem. Then what would I use to keep the daisies in my hair?
    Recalculating....

  15. #15
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    Velcro leg bands have the added advantage of also being reflective (usually). My pants are pretty baggy (but not as baggy as Rodar's bell bottoms) so I use one to keep them in check. Otherwise, they get caught in my chainrings. Basically, you have to fold your pants over to keep the material from sticking out below the band. Cinch it up tight so it doesn't slide down, but not so tight that it rips loose when you move your leg. Surprisingly, it takes more fine tuning than you would think.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

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