Kudos from the doctors office- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Kudos from the doctors office

    I'm not sure if I ever posted this on this forum, but I'm a Cancer Survivor (Large Diffuse B-Cell Lymphoma). Although it has been a few years since I've completed chemotherapy, I still see an Oncologist regularly.

    So I go to my appointment today and the Oncology Nurse takes my vitals before I actually see the Oncologist. As I'm sitting there with getting my blood pressure checked, he looks at the readout and asks me if I run a lot. I reply, 'I run occasionally, but I ride my bike all the time." He says, "It shows because your heart rate is 51 beats per minute." Then he went on to explain how athletes usually have lower than average heart rates. I didn't say anything, but I thought to myself, "Cool, I'm an athlete!"
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  2. #2
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    I read an article that said in his prime, Miguel Indurain on a climbing stage could maintain 60bpm, then max out in a sprint at 190bmp...the kicker is that he could recover back to 60bmp within one minute, all while still climbing. Unbelievable.

    Congrats on beating cancer AND the low heartrate.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  3. #3
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    I'm sure I'm nervous enough at the doctor's that my heart rate is kind of high anyway, or maybe I should just do more cardio. Congrats on beating the Big C man, that's great!
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  4. #4
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    Congrats on the Lymphoma! And on the fitness.

    My mother was the only survivor of the first eight to get the chemotherapy for Lymphoma and she got another 27 years and was cancer free (heart not so good). Not sure exactly which type it was. But at that time it was like Pancreatic cancer. So I understand the miracle. So would she.

    I was on several heart medications and cycling. Between losing 40 pounds from riding, and getting more fit, I had dropped my rest pulse rate to the low 50's. The Beta blocker dropped me to nearly comatose: 42. Now I'm down to one med, and that at half rate. And my max pulse is about 10 high for my age.

    From Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heart_rate
    Tour de France cyclist Lance Armstrong has a resting HR around 32 bpm, and it is not unusual for people doing regular exercise to get below 50 bpm. Other cyclists like Miguel Indurain and Alberto Contador have reported resting heart rates in the mid-20s.

    So yeah, it works. If you don't get run over.
    Last edited by BrianMc; 04-17-2010 at 09:27 AM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy
    I read an article that said in his prime, Miguel Indurain on a climbing stage could maintain 60bpm, then max out in a sprint at 190bmp...the kicker is that he could recover back to 60bmp within one minute, all while still climbing. Unbelievable.

    Congrats on beating cancer AND the low heartrate.
    I am not sure I believe this

    but cool nonetheless



    oh, and stay healthy Solomon76!!

  6. #6
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    Congratulations on your truimph!!!!! When I was younger and inshape! My doctor once recorded my resting HB at 36 BPM! He thought I was dead...

  7. #7
    a lazy pedaler
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    +1 on Congrats on the Lymphoma! And on the fitness.

    just yesterday I did the test that comes on my Polar watch...resting HR..68!!!

    Today on a 60Km mtb ride I did...my HR was pretty much over 170! all the time!even on flat parts! I will check the watch and if it is fine...I will see a doc!...I wonder if it has something to do with my 220lbs

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinsillo
    +1 on Congrats on the Lymphoma! And on the fitness.

    just yesterday I did the test that comes on my Polar watch...resting HR..68!!!

    Today on a 60Km mtb ride I did...my HR was pretty much over 170! all the time!even on flat parts! I will check the watch and if it is fine...I will see a doc!...I wonder if it has something to do with my 220lbs
    Thank you all for the positive responses.

    I'm pretty sure that I was worse off than this a few years ago. I was 230 when I started commuting back in March/April of '08. Now I hover somewhere between 195 and 200.
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  9. #9
    weirdo
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    Good job, Solomon.

    Does anybody know if blood pressure changes in relation to those ultra low heart rates?
    Recalculating....

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    Good job, Solomon.

    Does anybody know if blood pressure changes in relation to those ultra low heart rates?
    not really. if pressure were to fall, sensors would speed up the heart rate. i suppose vascular tension supports stability of pressure between beats

    this is my take

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    Good job, Solomon.

    Does anybody know if blood pressure changes in relation to those ultra low heart rates?
    Obviously better if a cardiologist would reply, but I suspect few commute by bike.

    So with a sample size of one, here's my experience. My resting pulse dropped from 68-72 to 48-52 when I lost 40 pounds riding bike slowly increasing to over 200 miles a week, but my BP was still bad and highly variable. Occassional exercise chest pain. So fitness increased, weight was lost but BP generally 130-140 over 90-105 but some days were 160-180 over 105-115, one reading of 200/120 (forgot my meds). BP dropped to below 120/80 after discovering that I had intolerance and no longer ate gluten and other foods and responded to vitamin and mineral supplements (messed up gut because of intolerance). No chest pain anymore.

    This made a lot of sense because two catheterizations found no cardiovascular blockage after I had serious chest pain attacks (not responsive to Nitro Glycerin). So blood clots with no constrictions. Apparently food was killling me by a more direct means than clogging arteries with fatty deposits.

    The doctor and I both expected a decrease in BP. It is supposed to be 90% lifestyle and I was doing all the right things. So my take is unless you have some other issues, your BP should drop some. If it doesn't and you are eating right, something else may be involved. Complicating factors include how much hardening has occured, how much stress you relieve by biking (can really help lower BP) or increase it with idiot drivers (raises BP), how much weight you drop, and hereditary factors. Obviously YMMV.

  12. #12
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    I pretty much agree with BrianMc. Here is my 2 cents.

    You have to do a lot of exercising to get to the point where your resting HR is lower than average. So I suspect that the constant exercise will result in a lower BP reading. I'm not sure how much of a direct effect a low HR has on your overall BP, but the process of getting the low resting HR (constantly exercising) has to help achieve a lower BP.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solomon76
    I pretty much agree with BrianMc. Here is my 2 cents.

    You have to do a lot of exercising to get to the point where your resting HR is lower than average. So I suspect that the constant exercise will result in a lower BP reading. I'm not sure how much of a direct effect a low HR has on your overall BP, but the process of getting the low resting HR (constantly exercising) has to help achieve a lower BP.
    what he outlined above is completely different than an athlete with an ultra low HR as the other person had inquired regarding the very low BP associated with the HR. the illustration Brian gave above is not the same.

    just because their highly trained HR has gone lower and lower, doesn't mean their baroreceptors have a changed set-point. it would not make sense as end-organ perfusion still needs to adequately occur...if it wasn't, HR would just be bumped up a notch

  14. #14
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    You're right. My bad. Late, and should have gone to bed.

    He WAS asking about the ultra low super fit cyclist resting rates.

    OK try again. In extremely fit people, the hereditary minimum for that person's baroreceptors would long be the case. Normal BP varies, but 115/75 is the higher end for fit hunter gatherer societies. Our 120/80 'norm' is a western culture bias. Some have resting BP's as low as 90/60. So I'd expect the same ranges of BP norms in these athletes as seen in these very fit cultures.

    Any vascular hardening will decrease elasticity and increase those numbers. Diet (meaning eating the right things and not junk food, not a restricted total intake, necessarily) and exercise can restore vascular health some but the longer it has been an issue the less total reversion is likely to occur. Unrelieved stress is an issue affecting BP but riding somehow helps us lose this. Riding in traffic may be an exception.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc
    You're right. My bad. Late, and should have gone to bed.

    He WAS asking about the ultra low super fit cyclist resting rates.

    OK try again. In extremely fit people, the hereditary minimum for that person's baroreceptors would long be the case. Normal BP varies, but 115/75 is the higher end for fit hunter gatherer societies. Our 120/80 'norm' is a western culture bias. Some have resting BP's as low as 90/60. So I'd expect the same ranges of BP norms in these athletes as seen in these very fit cultures.
    I have recently become interested in this type of stuff and anthropology. Have you been reading up on it? Where did you read about those BP numbers, those are things that interest me. The more I look into things the more I see we are so messed up...to the point of, by and large, being irreversible. Only those who take it upon themselves, like apparently us, will hopefully benefit. The rest is too tied into special interest groups, government, big pharma, and on and on and on and on to change.

    Any good books you recommend? Like where you read about the lower BPs hunter/gatherers?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mx_599
    I have recently become interested in this type of stuff and anthropology. Have you been reading up on it?
    My brother is a nurse on a criminal psych ward and we have been reading a lot and exchanging info.

    Quote Originally Posted by mx_599
    Where did you read about those BP numbers, those are things that interest me.
    I was sensitive to 'normal BP' definitions. So I may have gleaned this from differnt sources. It will take me awhile to track it down. However, 'low blood pressure' is defined as 90/60 in persons showing no symptoms and higher if dizzziness and other manifestaions of too little blood to the brain are seen.

    Quote Originally Posted by mx_599
    The more I look into things the more I see we are so messed up...to the point of, by and large, being irreversible. Only those who take it upon themselves, like apparently us, will hopefully benefit. The rest is too tied into special interest groups, government, big pharma, and on and on and on and on to change.

    I was recognized to be sensitive to at least three of the foods I have issues with now when I went on solid food over ahalf centrury of eating stuff that was killing me has likely made me sensitive to more and certain things beyond repair. I was overweight but deficient in B vitamins, Magnesium, and others. We still have yet to learn everything about food and the stuff thay put in food-like substances, and what they do to us.

    Quote Originally Posted by mx_599
    Any good books you recommend? Like where you read about the lower BPs hunter/gatherers?
    Blue Zones by Dan Buettner
    -cultures with long vital lifespans and how they differ form Western Cultures. Food, social, and spiritual aspects.

    Healthy at 100 by John Robbins – 2006
    - similar and complementary to Blue Zones but with a different viewpoint. A look at several cultures some of which have been altered and lost, where people routinely lived productive vital and long lives and what that may say about our Western Lifestyle.

    The Omnivore’s Dilemma* & In Defense of Food by Michael Pollan – 2005? 2008?
    Omnivore: issues with modern food production and delivery and how we were not built to eat this stuff. "Eat food, not too much, mostly plants."

    Health Defence by Dr Paul Clayton –2004
    How you can combine the most protective nutrients from the world’s diets to slow aging and achieve optimum health. Minimum RDA’s are that: MINIMUM to avoid overt disease, optimal is something else and if you have absorption issues…

    Good Calories, Bad Calories –Gary Taubes -2007
    -Articles reviewing the state of knowledge on food and our biochemistry first published in Science magazine. While it is the densest and most in need of a translator, it presents a very clear picture of why science and diet has been such a mess for so long. The insight of diabetes research was missed by those working in the area of weight loss.

    What are you Eating?* Amanda Ursell -2005
    How to become food label savvy.

    Death by Supermarket*- Nancy Deville -2007
    The fattening, dumbing down, and poisoning of America

    Food Matters* – Mark Bittman 2009
    A guide to conscious eating from the author of ‘How to Cook Everything’ with recipes.

    * I haven’t read these –yet.

    I also Google A LOT so who knows? I know the 115/75 is good as a upper 'norm' in those groups and the 90/60 is a defined norm below which is hypotension.
    Last edited by BrianMc; 04-18-2010 at 04:40 PM.

  17. #17
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    thanks for comprising this list. A couple I knew about but not the others. will add to my growing list


  18. #18
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    Awesome job putting the kibosh on cancer!

    I think that food is a huge factor here as others have stated, in bp and overall health. Our food here in the US is like crap. I call it 'fake food.' You know, everything is like 'apple flavored' or processed to death and vitamins and minerals have to be added in because it is nothing after it is processed.

    No wonder so many are suffering with health issues like high BP or cholesterol.

    I was 1lb away from being obese, and started cycling again after 8 years off the bike. I dropped about 38lbs (I'm a 5'1.5" 50 year old woman), and have about 12 lbs to go. Fat, but not obese. Went from pant size 14 and tight, to 6. BP, around 120/60~70. Cholesterol a bit high at 160 but good cholesterol is 90 (eat lots of soy-doc was suprised). Bad cholesterol was 200 so getting better with diet change. Stopped eating almost all sweets; sub cinnamon and small amount of honey for sugars if needed. Upped the vegies (organic) and cut out almost all fatty meats. Added nuts and fruits, snack on carrots, grapes, soy and cherries at work. Commute 3 times a week and cycle on the weekends. It works, no meds. Resting heart rate went from mid 60s to 49. Co-workers huff up stairs and I say 'hello' and jog up without increase in breathing. I feel like a different person; not the typical fat American.

    My bicycle is a time machine; with it, I take my body back to a younger feeling, healthier state.
    Tzvia.

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