Internal gear or 1x9?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Internal gear or 1x9?

    I would like to turn an old GT Outpost hartail into a commuter/city bike. Would you guys say internal geared or 1x9 would be better? Of course 1x9 would be more cost efficient.

    What type of chain ring would I need to turn this into a 1x9 if I went that route?

  2. #2
    a lazy pedaler
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    I don't know about types...but I just remove the granny and big rings...and that worked fine form me....if you check the single-speed forum lots of people do it that way.

  3. #3
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    I did the convert a beat up 52 into a chain guard and run the 42. When that gets too big with the 34 in back (60 is around the corner), I plan on the SS route and a 34.

    URL=https://img41.imageshack.us/i/chainguard2.jpg/][/URL]

  4. #4
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    ^^ Wow, looks nice. Did you just take a grinder to it?

  5. #5
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    My Black anodized and cross drilled original still has some life in it, and I had a NOS 42 silver so I could swap out the matching old 42 at the same time. So I asked around and got this old Sugino 52 with scars, paint worn teeth, (free, except for labor!) that is an exact match to the NOS 42. Good bike shops tend to be pack rats.

    Step 1: Chainwheel in wood lined vise: Hack sawed each tooth off close to base.
    Step 2: 3/8 cordless drill with grinding wheel (sharpens hoes etc.) ground stubs to common diameter (close)
    Step 3: Filed last remnants of base by hand so I could maintain the nice rim that was at the base of the teeth.
    Step 4: Sanding wheels in drill from coarse to fine to get a nice smooth edge.
    Step 5: Screwed the chainwheel to scrap plywood and polished each side as the clear anodizing was about 10-15% gone.
    Step 6: Steel wool then polishing compound. You will get black. Polished edge

    Result: Nice recycled chain wheel/guard for 144 mm BCD crankset (no commercial ones available).
    The 11/34 cassette is controlled by a 1984 Suntour RD with no issues. Sweet. Loaded 2 x 7 was a handful, 1 x 9 has same number but better spaced ratios and easy to use. Will post picture as new commuter this week when sun comes out. It's been my 'cargo' bike until tomorrow.

    PS I'd love IGH but have too much money in bike until I've been working a while. The cargo mods are half paid for by saving car use. Now I start paying off the bike restoration.
    Last edited by BrianMc; 04-26-2010 at 11:43 AM.

  6. #6
    Bedwards Of The West
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    Wow Brian, that's a labor of love. I'd have gotten 20 or so of the teeth cut off and abandoned that project

    I left both rings on my road double crankset, but I run it with no front derailleur, so it's effectively a 1x8 set up with a 50 tooth front...but you can manually drop the chain down onto the other (34 tooth) ring in the front if you're not feeling like pushing the 50. I used to drop the chain every now and then, but since installing a new rear derailluer I haven't had a single issue. No guards, no chainguides. I'd try an internal gear if I could afford one, but this set up works too well to justify switching.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  7. #7
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy
    Wow Brian, that's a labor of love. I'd have gotten 20 or so of the teeth cut off and abandoned that project
    Thanks. Maybe I should be the one asking to be called crazy.

    After the first 10-12 teeth you get this rhythm, ya know? About 2 hours total in it. This way the business casual doesn't get too casual. One Milwaulkie shop had numbered limited edition bash guards for 144 BCD for only $150, I think. So, mine is less fancy say $100 one-off Sugino, I paid myself $50 an hour. Not bad.

    After only errands, tomorrow she commutes! Kinda excited. Can you tell? Rebuilt her with new and some recycled parts from The Duchess. Cold set the stays and cold reset the bent fork. Converted to POS Weinman/cheap Shimano 700C and cassette. You get emotionally attached after all that recycling. A nice 4020 Chromo butted Taiwan frame in 62 cm, and uncommon. Haven't named her yet, though. She's not in the commuter bike pictures until tomorow. Sorry OP, a bit off topic but she's a 1 x9, fine, and mine!

    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy
    I'd try an internal gear if I could afford one, but this set up works too well to justify switching.
    I'd love a Rohloff but for those bills, I'd have a nice 29'er HT or a new disc cross for commuting/errands and the Schwinn as SS. I think it depends on how much, salt, sand, and crud you have to clean off your RD in the winter and if you need the gear range and simple shifting without an FD. Winter rides here melt off really well, so I could hardly justify the expense when rim brakes get frozen into non functioning and I need a disc bike and studded tires. Alpine's less moolah, but I hear no siren song to have one. I have 9 ratios. It has 8. Maybe when this drivetrain is worn, and the Rohloff is still the impossible dream, I will be ready to hear the Alpine's song.

  8. #8
    One What?
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    Well, I went the 1x7 route on my commuter and haven't regret it.

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