I want to rebuild my new (oldish) commuter- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ymduhh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    135

    building my new (oldish) commuter

    I had been browsing Craigslist for almost two weeks. I found the bike I had been wanting to get as a commuter for $80, it's a mid-90's to late-90s Specialized Hardrock according the guy who sold it to me. Luckily, it happened to be a LBS owner and he had changed out the bottom bracket since it had broken when he received the bike. But, anyway, I am going to build it up and hopefully have one of the better looking bikes on campus (even if it is old).



    I want to do upgrades to it since a lot components are rusted a bit and I am stripping it down to give it a fresh coat of paint and to battle off tiny rust marks on the steel frame. Anyway, I took it apart today and this is a better image of the frame and fork:



    I want to change out the most of the bike to turn it into a commuter one. I am debating if I should keep the mountain bike tires or not. But anyway, can you guys suggest anything to turn this old bike into a commuter? The frame size is a 17.5" and that's all I know. A lot of the parts that came on the bike are still the original parts but I think it's time it received a complete change. Any recommendations on what I should change out and add? This is my first build up of a bike I have ever done. So I am looking forward to it!

    (sorry if the image is to big, I don't know how to make it smaller here)
    Last edited by ymduhh; 08-01-2011 at 10:01 AM.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,539
    Looks great! Should make a fine commuter. I'd put it back together, tune it up, replace what needs replacing, and ride it for a while. Then you can decide what changes you'd want to make. It has eyelets for fenders/rack so I'd put those on the shopping list if applicable.
    Jason
    Disclaimer: www.paramountfargo.com

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ymduhh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    135
    Thanks! I love it so far. I rode it around the first day and the second and was figuring out what to change out. So far its the cranks, handebars, shifters, and that's about it so far. Maybe the saddle, but not yet though. But in due time it should become a good bike to ride around.

  4. #4
    banned
    Reputation: marpilli's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    3,993
    My father in law started using his as a commuter and was looking for decent and inexpensive tires. He bought a pair of the Forte Gotham tires from Performance Bike for $10 each. He's happy with them so far. If you're on a budget, it might be one to look at.

    I agree with JAG to take it slowly. Otherwise you'll soon realized you have sunk some serious money in the bike. I'm speaking from experience when I say it's a slippery slope...

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ymduhh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    135
    I am planning to paint it myself to save the cash from paying the body shop guy, unless one of my customers give me a hook up on the job. But, I was looking at the tires today at performance and saw the Forte Gotham tires. I was tempted to buy them actually since I don't really think I will be needing my current tires on my bike for the light trail use and commuting around and stuff. I have a limited budget haha considering i need to save as much as possible for my semester this year. So over time, my budget will be $100 or maybe less or more depending on what i will need. Since this will be my commuter and mess around bike,
    Last edited by ymduhh; 07-29-2011 at 08:54 PM.

  6. #6
    banned
    Reputation: marpilli's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    3,993
    If that's the case then just use the tires you have until they wear down.

    Seriously, refurbish (clean, fix, lubricate) anything you can on it and save up some cash for what you need. As things break or wear out then think about upgrading. Make a list of things you'd like to have and keep an eye on craigslist for a good deal.

    Frames can always be re-painted later. So, in my opinion, there's no harm in trying to do it yourself if you think you're capable of it. These forums are a great place to learn by other's mistakes and get it as close to perfect as you can. Most of all, enjoy the learning process.

  7. #7
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    7,699
    Personally, I like those classic, almost tacky paint schemes, and would touch it up if possible, but to each his/her own. The most likely candidates to have actually worn out (but but not necessarily) are the chain, front chainrings, and rear cogs. The other stuff often keeps working fine even when old. New brake pads will make a huge difference, the old ones get brittle.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ymduhh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    135
    I would have loved to have kept the pink and white/light pink color on the the bike but on the side that is in the image, you can't see it but there was a huge spot that had nothing but bare steel showing on the other side. Plus the numerous amounts of rust spots, so I stripped the paint down yesterday and today i got down to trying to get the remaining pieces of paint left on the bike. Sanding a bike is not easy, hopefully I will have it done tomorrow so I can take it around to a few body shops and see how much they would charge to do just a flat white color on it. I would do it on my own but I am horrible in doing painting. If it comes out to be more than at $60-70 I am going to just paint it myself.

    But I am going to pick up a new chain tomorrow since the one that came on the bike had rust spots on the links.

  9. #9
    banned
    Reputation: marpilli's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    3,993
    I don't think you have to remove all of the paint if you're going to re-paint the frame. Just make sure any remaining paint in the corners is "de-glossed". Use something like TSP to clean the frame before you put down the first coat of primer. And, don't touch the frame with bare hands once it's been cleaned (use nitrile or latex gloves). The oil from you skin can have an affect on your paint job.

    A can of primer (maybe a good self-etching primer) and a couple of cans of spraypaint shouldn't cost too much. And, you can always re-paint it in a couple of years when you have more funds available.

    Be sure to read and follow any directions on the cans. Thin coats and allow adequate drying and hardening time for the paint.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ymduhh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    135
    I am going to start the painting today but this morning as I was taking the frame to my shop to work on it there, I noticed that the handlebars are actually shorter than the ones I have on my other bikes, so I am going to look into replacing them since they aren't as comfortable plus I like a little rise to my bars. But I just don't know what the size of the stem is or if I can just replace the whole thing to accommodate a handlebar a littler wider.



    It seems like the stem is welded with the other piece, is there a way I can replace the whole thing or something?

  11. #11
    Short-Change-Hero
    Reputation: gregnash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    6,430
    That is actually a quill stem, I am thinking maybe 1" threaded. Bars are probably pretty small either 25.4 or 26.0mm.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ymduhh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    135
    Is there a way to replace the whole thing so I can fit bigger bars on it? Since I will using this bike for my commuting the small bars would be kind of uncomfortable.

  13. #13
    banned
    Reputation: marpilli's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    3,993
    You shouldn't need to replace the whole thing.

    Remove the grips (google or search MTBR for ways to remove grips if you don't want to cut them off - I use WD-40). Loosen the brake and shifter levers (yellow circles) and remove them. Then, loosen the stem (green circle) and remove the handlebar.

    I want to rebuild my new (oldish) commuter-untitled-1-1.jpg

    Take the handlebar to a local bike shop and they will measure the diameter for you so you'll know what to buy. Purchase new handlebar that is longer and has a "rise" to it.

    Reverse procedure to install the new bar.

    Also, tell the bike shop this will be a commuter. Maybe they have a bar that also has some "sweep" to it that might be more comfortable.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ymduhh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    135
    awesome, thanks for the diagram. I pulled the bar off and will be taking it to the LBS in my area for measurement, so I can pick up a new bar.

Similar Threads

  1. OT : Selling oldish Comic Books on the front range
    By Zeroack in forum Colorado - Front Range
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 01-15-2011, 07:40 AM
  2. My first commuter
    By like a chump in forum Commuting
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 08-25-2009, 02:42 PM
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-12-2008, 05:45 PM
  4. I want to be a commuter!
    By Method of Rhythm in forum Riding Passion
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 02-20-2008, 04:10 PM
  5. New Commuter - OTN.
    By Timo in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-31-2006, 09:31 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.