I need rain gear...suggestions please!- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    I need rain gear...suggestions please!

    Well, it's raining now and I don't wanna stop riding to work.
    What gear do you guys ride in?

    Obviously, I'd like to keep myself dry, but I don't know what to wear that won't make me sweat too much and isn't super bulky.

    Also, I'd like to hear some ideas to keep the work clothes dry (ie. my backpack)
    TIA
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  2. #2
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    Out of all the rain pants I have purchased in the past I like the Craft Bullet Rain Pant the best...it is a bit on the warm side being it has no vent zippers or flaps but it's lightweight and very comfortable, great design and fit. For jackets I use the Fox Teknik rain jacket it is very comfortable and has great venting, plus I like the hood which fits over my helmet so if it is dumping my head stays pretty dry. The Fox stuff is pretty pricey as well...

    Gloves vary for me on how cold it is, not so much how wet...Salsa Tostada's for really cold...

    You may want to see if REI has a rain fly/pack-cover for your backpack, I am sure they have something you can use...I have a Camelbak that has a rain fly built into it, it stores into a small zipper compartment on the bottom.

  3. #3
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    Good rain gear isn't cheap, but well worth it. Everyone will have their own opinions, but if it's expensive, it probably works! (though I am sure there are exceptions).

    Good luck!
    "Donuts. Is there anything they can't do?"

  4. #4
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    Gore Tex is where it's at. I still can't make myself drop $200 on a good rain shell, but one day I will. Currently I have Bellweather "aqua no" rain pants, and a Louis Garneau rain shell. They both work pretty good, but they're 3 seasons old and aren't as waterproof as they once were. The Garneau jacket doesn't breathe that well, that's my major complaint.

    I hit the sales at pricepoint and nashbar, and get stuff in the $80 range for $40 or so... I get more snow than rain, so it's hard to justify getting the really good stuff.

    I did get smart with this jacket though, and bought it a size big so I can wear it OVER the backpack. This works really really well for keeping your stuff dry guaranteed. Nothing else to mess with, just the jacket. You look like a hunchback, but you're a dry hunchback. And your iPod/Cell phone/underpants are guaranteed to stay dry in your backpack. Buy a size larger (or two depending on how much crap you carry in your backpack) and you won't regret it on the really wet days.
    Last edited by CommuterBoy; 10-19-2009 at 11:31 AM.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  5. #5
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    ...double post
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  6. #6
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    I just got the Showers Pass Club Pant. They're the ones without the eVent fabric. The eVent would be alot better but also costs more than twice as much. I'm not sure if they make the club pants any more but I just got them at my LBS for $90. They work well so far and have a neet knee vent that helps with the sweat while keeping you dry. You can also open the pockets and they vent as well (mesh pockets).

    I just have a Marmot rain jacket - nothing fancy but it does the trick. I would like to get a nice biking specific jacket eventually for the longer tail as my normal length jacket tends to ride up a little bit. I keep the armpit zips open to help with moisture built up inside.

    For the head, I got a Gore-Tex helmet cover and it works awesome. Then I got some Neoprene booties that go over my regular shoes and some nice waterproof breathable gloves.

    To keep my stuff dry, I just got a rear rack and the Nashbar waterproof panniers. They work awesome so far and I haven't had any water leak in. I also like not having all my gear on my back when it isn't raining.

    This is my first winter commuting so I haven't been in the rain a ton yet but so far I've stayed completely dry.

  7. #7
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    Do you have shower facilities at your work? I have to ride about nine miles in, so regardless of what I wear, I get sweaty, so waterproof gear isn't the most important thing for me. However, I have an REI taku jacket (bought an off model from the Outlet and some cheap 20 dollar fishing pants that I pull over my jeans. They are really waterproof and not at all breathable, but as I said before, I sweat a lot over nine miles, and I think most waterproof gear is "breathable" at best, unless you are going to drop some money.

    I have an Ortlieb backpack and it is very waterproof and comfortable. It is a little small- usually I can get dress clothes, dress shoes, lunch, repair kit, toiletries and maybe one more thing, but it is maxed out at that juncture.

    Neoprene booties.

    Once you put it all on, turn on those lights for safety and begin eating road spray through gritted teeth and squinting eyes, you might be the coolest person in your town.

  8. #8
    Bedwards Of The West
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    Fenders man, fenders.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  9. #9
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    Yes, fenders! It doesn't rain here as much as other places and I have a fairly short commute, so I only use a Dickie's water resistant windbreaker. The rest of me gets wet but I dry fairly quick. It also gets pretty humid here when it rains (even in winter) so I'd like to get a windbreaker that isn't lined.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  10. #10
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    I too ride to work rain or shine, and I literally wear board shorts year-round(probably because I live 15 miles from the ocean.)

    It's just one of those things you have to accept that if it rains, you're going to get wet, so no point getting frustrated or pissed coming in. I just buckle down, watch out for motorists, turn all the lighs on and enjoy the ride. If you do happen to consider getting a new backpack, there are some Camelbak's that have built-in ponchos for the backpack itself so you can store everything safe and dry inside. Good luck! Here's mine and one of me just before a downpour...







  11. #11
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    I'm Diggin that backpack
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  12. #12
    ride the moment
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    I live in western Oregon and it pretty much rains for 8 months in a row. I have a Gore Bikewear Jacket that I love and use for commuting and forest riding. Cycling specific rain jackets are nice because they are cut long in the back, short in the front, and don't bunch up on your shoulders when you've got your arms out in front. I got it on sale at Nashbar for $70 and its on its third winter. I just treat it with the wash in stuff at the beginning of the season and it still keeps me dry.

    Pants can go one of two ways. If your commute is short and you want something to put on over your jeans, then I recommend some full side-zip rain pants for pack-packing. That way you can put them on and off without taking your shoes off. I use my Mountain Hardwear 3-ply gore-tex pants over with a velcro strap around the ankles to keep them out of the chain. Of course your shoes will get soaked so consider boots or waterproof trail running shoes. However, now that my commute is 6.5 miles each way, jeans and rain pants are a bit bulky so I just wear warm tights and change when I get to work. I use my cycling shoes and spd pedals and then leave a dry pair in my office.

    +1 for waterproof panniers to keep your stuff dry. Also, get your light situation in order. Bright lights... not crappy ones. Get a few of them.
    Hey Butthead, are we gonna die? - Beavis

  13. #13
    Hairy man
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    I bring my clothes in an Ortleib bag. I just wear my regular cycling clothes on the bottom and an cheap waterproof jacket on top (it has armpit zippers, which are a bonus). I've got waterproof booties which I like when it gets colder, my shoes dry fast but cold water splashing over your toes is unpleasant. I've got some waterproof gloves (Descente) which are unlined but roomy enough for a liner if it gets frigid.

    And full fenders. You gotta have the fenders.
    We all get it in the end.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    I'm Diggin that backpack
    Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogbrain
    Also, get your light situation in order. Bright lights... not crappy ones. Get a few of them.
    I highly agree! If you notice, I have a light on my backpack to be visible higher than the one Superflash mounted on my bike. Given my Superflash can truly be seen over a mile away, two lights are better than none at all. For the front, I have one of those SSC P7 lights that I put on what I call seizure mode, because you can be dressed in all the raingear all you want, but your safety can't be compromised as most accidents happen the first 15 minutes of rain/downpour.

  15. #15
    Stroke my hair vest
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    Anyone here heard of Loki Gear? The jackets and coats have built in mittens and gators and it will fold up into a backpack. Their top of the line gear uses eVent so it's breathable and waterproof. It's worth checking out.

    REI/ Novara makes an affordable pair of waterproof pants ~$60.

    And depending on the length of commute and whether you use clipless or flats, Sorels with guarantee a dry pair of feet.

  16. #16
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    Man, I'm pricing some of this stuff ..:EEK:
    why does biking have to be so expensive
    I thought I was supposed to be saving $$ doing so
    (I know, it's an investment)

    RE:
    Lights: - got some - some Blackburn whatchamacallits - they're 'ok', but I guess I could stand to get more/brighter ones - but again, expensive!!
    Fenders: - got a great set - some SKS shockblade/X-blade ones

    Thanks for the tips - keep 'em comin'
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  17. #17
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    RE: REI - no REI up here in norcal...WTF??!!
    seems like the perfect place to have one... weird
    Anybody wanna be a financial backer for me? I'll open a store.

    BTW, 'WTF' stands for 'why the face'
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  18. #18
    Drinking the Slick_Juice
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    what is that camel bak cover called?
    "If women don't find handsome , they should at least find you handy."-Red Green

  19. #19
    Bedwards Of The West
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    RE: REI - no REI up here in norcal...WTF??!!
    seems like the perfect place to have one... weird
    Anybody wanna be a financial backer for me? I'll open a store.

    BTW, 'WTF' stands for 'why the face'

    Where are you at in NorCal?
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  20. #20
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    ^^^Redding temporarily- should be Chico, but deaths occur and whatev
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  21. #21
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    I have a $30 Bellwether plastic rain jacket that's good for short trips. This one's got a zipper and storm flap, not just velcro like some brands.

    Pro: It won't lose waterproofness over time. It's cheap.

    Con: It has no inherent breathability and just has mesh under the arms for venting, so if you exert yourself, you'll get sweaty. But I find that to be a universal trait of any rain jackets, so I'm going with $30 instead of $200 here Also, it's not a hi-vis color, although it does have a reflective stripe across the back.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    Man, I'm pricing some of this stuff ..:EEK:
    why does biking have to be so expensive
    Most hobbies are. If it makes you feel any better, my martial arts, and auto racing/custom car hobbies are much more expensive than the two-wheel hobby.

    Quote Originally Posted by nuck_chorris
    what is that camel bak cover called?
    The yellow built-in rain protector? I guess you could call it a beacon, because you'll definitely be seen from behind.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by LUNARFX
    Most hobbies are. If it makes you feel any better, my martial arts, and auto racing/custom car hobbies are much more expensive than the two-wheel hobby.
    I totally know... I snowboard also ( since '87)
    I DJ ('95) - (any techno lovers out there? )
    Don't get me started on fishing gear/ license...

    I swear, if I was a shut-in, I could be 'shut in' to 4 or 5 houses by now !!
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  24. #24
    Bedwards Of The West
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    ^^ It would be worth the trip to Reno the next time they have a 'garage sale' at REI. Just looked it up, there's one on Nov 7: http://www.rei.com/stores/store_even...ignore_cache=1

    If you haven't been to a garage sale at REI, you're missing out... get there 3 or 4 hours early to get a good spot in line (and be thankful you're not in seattle where the early birds are there 2 days early)...they sell off everything that's been returned. Just about every piece of 'gear' for my expensive hobbies came from an REI garage sale. $300 tent? 50 bucks. $200 boots for backpacking? 20 bucks. $200 softshell jacket? 60 bucks. My wife's K2 snowboard deck (unused)? 40 bucks.
    Save your pennies and make the drive at some point... you will save more than your gas money.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  25. #25
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    great tip man
    -never been to a 'garage sale'
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  26. #26
    Bedwards Of The West
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    I got my current tires, fenders, gloves, glasses, and just about everything I'm wearing for my winter commute at REI garage sales... at the last one in Reno I got two vittoria 'cross tires ($30 each new) for 9 bucks. My superflash taillight was 5 bucks. My Cateye headlight was 10 bucks... the list goes on

    They are quarterly... every 3 months. The one after Christmas is off the hook!!!
    Last edited by CommuterBoy; 10-22-2009 at 08:56 AM.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  27. #27
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    Thanks for the reminder about the REI garage sale, never been to one myself either though I remember you mentioning it before. FYI, the San Carlos store is also having their garage sale on November 7 for you Bay Area folks.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  28. #28
    Bedwards Of The West
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    My wife and I spent $350 at one garage sale (before we had kids, haha) , and we went home and looked up the in-store price of everything we bought...it was over $1500 worth of stuff.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  29. #29
    i also unicycle
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    i rock endura luminite jacket and some of their "over trousers" for my commuter rain/cold weather. they breathe okay, but not great, but they are seriously waterproof. with my winter boots and several layers under them, i've ridden the 20-30 mins to work in -30F. and been kept bone dry in 55F windy rain storms. the luminite jacket is $130-ish retail and has large reflective patches and a built in blinky light. kinda gimmicky, but a good value even without it.

    //edit: i sell the stuff is how i know about it. i also have access to tons of other brands of rain gear and chose this stuff for a reason.
    mtbr says you should know: i work in a bike shop.
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  30. #30
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    I wear pretty much similar stuff that everyone else is mentioning - but to keep my clothes dry I appear to be the only one putting my stuff in a plastic bag inside my pack. Then even if there is a leak, they dont get wet.......

  31. #31
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    Showers Pass makes arguably the best rain gear that cyclists can buy. You can go to Youtube and search for Showers Pass and you'll find a bunch of videos describing the virtues of their gear (the videos are made by one of their distributors, so basically, they are propaganda, but they are informative). The stuff is expensive, but when you add up all of the money you spend on stuff that doesn't work and you later replace, well, you get the picture. Showers Pass pushes what they call "active ventilation". Basically, no matter how "breathable" the fabric of your gear is, no fabric will be breathable enough to keep you from stewing in your own sweat if you are exerting yourself. So their gear has lots of venting options like pit zips, loose cuffs, back vents, etc.

    REI is now selling some of the Showers Pass line. I have one of their jackets and a pair of their pants and I am very satisfied with them.

    That said, the utility of this gear depends upon the temperature and how far you have to ride. If your commute is long and the weather is warm, you are getting wet no matter what you wear, either from sweat or rain. You may just as well enjoy the rain and pack a change of clothes.

    For keeping stuff dry in the rain, Ortleib products have never let me down. I was once forced to ride through what was later determined to be in excess of a 100 year storm event. I was riding through streets with water up to the axles, and my Ortlieb panniers kept the contents bone dry.

    The guys who said "fenders" weren't lying. Fenders will help keep your feet dry and your bike clean(er), but nothing will help you in a 100 year storm At least you know you can keep your stuff dry.

  32. #32
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    anyone try sandles (keen?) with neoprene socks to keep ya feet's dry and warm?
    Feel the Bern!!!

  33. #33
    Bedwards Of The West
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    ^^ I use neoprene socks with the cycling shoes when it gets really cold. I desperately want some of the SPD compatible Keens. But when I break out the neoprene socks, It's usually because of the temperature rather than the moisture though. I'm fine with wet feet when it's not freezing out. I don't see using that combo... keens with no socks when it's raining, and neoprene socks when it's at snow temps would be the norm for me.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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    (no excuse for that either)

  34. #34
    Hail Satin!
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    Head to your local street motorcycle store. Most places sell one piece coverall suites or two piece tops bottom for less than $100.
    Also a pluss most all of them have reflective stripes or piping all over them.
    I have an old one piece from a company called fieldsheer that I keep in my motorcycle backpack. They roll down into a small little (about the size of a shoe) ball.
    It keeps me pretty dry going 80mph in a driving rain. So they should keep you dry on a bicycle.
    And no I have never tried them on my bike...for some reason. It's susposed to rain here in PA today. Maybe Ill give it a try.
    In the great Ford vs Chevy debate, I choose Porsche.

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