i mean lets be honest mountain bikes are probably better and faster commuters- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Idea! i mean lets be honest mountain bikes are probably better and faster commuters

    for their sheer ability to bounce on and off curbs, avoid cars and potholes and cut through different areas

  2. #2
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    You can do it on a road bike. Just have to be more "hardcore"....

  3. #3
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    I did do it on a road bike - got sick of replacing broken spokes.

    Of course when I didn't ride for a few years I got fat & slow and so granny gear came in handy too

  4. #4
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    Better and faster than a road bike? Maybe more FUN since you have the ability to cut corners, take dirt paths, etc....but here in Stockholm, the road bike is fastest due to the cycle path network. I actually jumped on my Roubaix today for the ride to work, hit 70kph on the descent to Lilieholmen

    But better and faster than my steel flat bar roadie that I commute 4000+ kilometers per year on? Hell no. Add cyclocross tires and the multisurface possibilities are endless.

  5. #5
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    Uh...I not even sure how to bunny hop. I mean I can get that front one off the ground pretty good, but how to get teh back one up is a mystery to me. I'm joined on this forum initially mostly for informational reasons. I didn't like the attitude I got from another commuting forum.

    I mean my bike is supposedly an urbanized mountain bike, Marin Point Reyes 29er, but I don't have much to compare it to.

  6. #6
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    One good thing about commuting with a 50 pound steel framed generic workhorse is one gets more workout per mile travelled.

    I thought my bike had everything I needed, until winter set in and the snow and ice played havoc with the roads and paths. Now I appreciate strong spokes, big tires, and what disc brakes can do, as well as a front suspension, and have acquainted myself fully with "T-9". I'm now considering purchase of a mountain bike for winter commuting.
    Check out this short fun blog on downhill mountain bikes

  7. #7
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    mountain bikes are probably better and faster commuters???

    i think many would disagree

    something tells me you are the kind of guy that is into silly commuter racing...

    could it be the way you just had to aggressively crow about your perceived superiority for your own choice of commuter bike?

  8. #8
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    Any bike commutting is faster and better than any bike in the garage/house/appartment. Ride what you own. Oh, and the best bike depends so much on the environmnet you ride in and the rider that it changes with a move or age. If I could I'd have a bigger stable and the best bike would change with the weather.

  9. #9
    Still want a fat bike....
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    Quote Originally Posted by markaitch
    something tells me you are the kind of guy that is into silly commuter racing...
    Nothing wrong with some Cat6 racing. I do it any time I see another commuter. Its nice to get a work out in and if I am trying to catch the person, its nice to say hi to a fellow commuter and check their story and share some tips/get new ideas.

    Anyway, as far as mtn or road bike, I think the best one is whichever one I currently have that's ridable. BrianMc is absolutely right. Who cares what kind of bike it is, so long as you are riding.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc
    Any bike commutting is faster and better than any bike in the garage/house/appartment. Ride what you own. Oh, and the best bike depends so much on the environmnet you ride in and the rider that it changes with a move or age. If I could I'd have a bigger stable and the best bike would change with the weather.

    There you go....

    On the other hand I like my one bike and three wheel sets.

  11. #11
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    i switch between a Klein quantum and an early 90's rockhopper with a fixed rear wheel. depends on what i need to do each day. i don't hop curbs on my klein, but then why would i need too? i don't stick to the asphalt with my rockhopper, but then why would i want too? a bike is as good as it's rider.

  12. #12
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    Different horses for different courses
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

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  13. #13
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    riding in the street with some crazy skinnytire bike can be suicide. you can hit sand or a pothole and crack open your noggin. also a car can hit you and smush you.

  14. #14
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    Whereas if you're on a mountain bike and a car hits you.... ???
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  15. #15
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    Maybe a fat bike would bounce off? Like the first gen VW Beetles did.

  16. #16
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    i often crash my skinnytire bike and crack open my head, but it just comes with the territory...

  17. #17
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    ride your mtb on the sidewalk until you see peole coming then hop on the road for a sec

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jseko
    Uh...I not even sure how to bunny hop. I mean I can get that front one off the ground pretty good, but how to get teh back one up is a mystery to me. I'm joined on this forum initially mostly for informational reasons. I didn't like the attitude I got from another commuting forum.

    I mean my bike is supposedly an urbanized mountain bike, Marin Point Reyes 29er, but I don't have much to compare it to.
    After you lift the front, push forward and slightly down as hard/fast as you can. That should rotate the back up. You can try it standing next to the bike, which should make it easier to see what is happening and do it without requiring as much power.

    Another way is to point both toes down with the pedals level (9 and 3 o'clock) and basically jump up. The friction between your feet and the pedals should be enough to get the back wheel up, even with the front wheel on the ground.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=74422
    Matt

  19. #19
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    In my case it's slower, but I have a nice MUT, no curbs and no dirt. I rode a mountain bike on this trek once. Once.
    :wq

  20. #20
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    I started with a upright MTB bars, front shock and 47mm slicks. A few years later I ride a rigid road frame with 35mm tires and drop bars. I do use 600gm rims (Mavic a319) that are un-bendable from my riding exploits. Curbs and potholes don't worry me, just a little more rattle to my fillings

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by hahdtail
    for their sheer ability to bounce on and off curbs, avoid cars and potholes and cut through different areas
    Yeah I find my 8" travel bike really softens the hits when riding into gutters.

    I don't subscribe to it.

    Every commute is different. Personally unless your road or path to work is nice and smooth (in which case a road bike is ideal), I'm convinced that a lugged cyclocross bike is the answer. They are so underrated - you can run a larger tyre but you're still able to get low enough to avoid the head winds.

    Suspension and wide tyres were never meant for a commuting bike unless your commute involves actual mountain biking.

    Riding a rigid bike will improve your skills on a suspension bike too, the reverse won't.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasevr4
    Riding a rigid bike will improve your skills on a suspension bike too, the reverse won't.

    Sorry that is total BS

    First of all riding any bike will improve your bike skills.

    Secondly trying new things on any bike will improve your bike skills.

    Suspension will train you to ride smoothly on the pavement.

    What people often say is riding a rigid bike will improve your bike skills cause you have to learn to absorb the bumps with your body more so than the bike....probabaly true to a degree....

    But to say that riding a suspension bike will not improve your skills is just flat out wrong.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc
    Ride what you own.
    Just be careful that enjoying and riding what you own doesn`t get in the way of good old Bike Lust

  24. #24
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    I dunno...and I'm not just saying this to disagree with jeffscott, which admittedly is a bit of a hobby of mine I agree that riding any bike improves bike skills, but I gotta back up the rigid bike as a training ground...

    I have a bit of a BMX history, and learning how to ride a fully rigid bike fast and smooth is a major training ground for a future in riding a hardtail or full suspension mountain bike fast and smooth. Learning how to bunnyhop on flat pedals, manual over stuff, etc, etc, are skills best learned on a rigid bike that can translate to a suspension bike. Suspension changes things...bunnyhopping is harder/different on a full suspension bike, cornering is different, and the suspension helps smooth things out, but being able to ride smoothly comes from the experience of knowing how a bike interacts with the ground, and riding a rigid bike helps you learn this like nothing else can.

    I credit my BMX history with whatever pathetic skills I have on a mountain bike, and even on my dirt bike (motorcycle, to clarify). I have been accused of being a pretty smooth rider, and if it's at all true, it's because of learning how to 'feel the flow' on a fully rigid BMX.
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  25. #25
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    this argument could be taken one step further--

    riding a fixed gear rigid will take those skills one step further, but maybe i sound like i'm playing devil's advocate here. I agree with jeffscott. riding any bike will improve your riding. riding certain styles of bike will get you "closer" to the bike, and make you more aware of what is going on underneath you, but riding is riding.

    just do it.

  26. #26
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    My commuter lands somewhere in between....


    and I think that is the perfect commuter

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    Sorry that is total BS

    First of all riding any bike will improve your bike skills.

    Secondly trying new things on any bike will improve your bike skills.

    Suspension will train you to ride smoothly on the pavement.

    What people often say is riding a rigid bike will improve your bike skills cause you have to learn to absorb the bumps with your body more so than the bike....probabaly true to a degree....

    But to say that riding a suspension bike will not improve your skills is just flat out wrong.
    You misinterpreted what I said. Riding a rigid bike will improve your skills on a suspension bike. Riding a suspension bike will not improve your skills on a rigid bike.

    Obviously riding ANY bike will improve your skills with riding bikes in general.

  28. #28
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    there is a logical flaw in that mate. google the transitive property

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasevr4
    You misinterpreted what I said. Riding a rigid bike will improve your skills on a suspension bike. Riding a suspension bike will not improve your skills on a rigid bike.Still BS

    Obviously riding ANY bike will improve your skills with riding bikes in general.

    Let's say you ride a gear suspension bike....then you pick up a geared rigid bike....

    Most of the lessons you learned about shifting will be directly applicable.

    Let say you ride a suspension bike with cleats...then you pick up a rigid bike with cleats.

    You will be comfortable cliking in and out just the same....

    So again riding a rigid bike will improve your bump absorbing skills better than riding a suspension bike.....but you still learn bump absorbing skills on a suspension bike.

    Same thing applies to a SS vs a geared bike....all the lessons are there for you to learn and most people do learn them perhaps a bit slower, but they are all learnable....

    Hell lots of suspension bikes of what amounts to a rigid lockout of the suspension so there you go again.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobby12many
    My commuter lands somewhere in between....


    and I think that is the perfect commuter
    What are those handlebars?

    They look like flat bars with a set of aero extensions integrated into them?

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304
    What are those handlebars?

    They look like flat bars with a set of aero extensions integrated into them?
    Thats pretty much exactly what they are 230g 6K carbon low rise bars with integrated aero/accessory mount extensions. The extensions are much more conducive to hand positioning than accessory mounting though....

    Bontrager Satellite Elite Carbon Trekking Handlebar
    630MM Width
    50MM Rise
    9 degree bend


    A few more pics that show them a bit better:
    https://i.imgur.com/5TVCL.jpg
    https://i.imgur.com/oGJxc.jpg

    the extensions are incredibly comfortable

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    Let's say you ride a gear suspension bike....then you pick up a geared rigid bike....

    Most of the lessons you learned about shifting will be directly applicable.

    Let say you ride a suspension bike with cleats...then you pick up a rigid bike with cleats.

    You will be comfortable cliking in and out just the same....

    So again riding a rigid bike will improve your bump absorbing skills better than riding a suspension bike.....but you still learn bump absorbing skills on a suspension bike.

    Same thing applies to a SS vs a geared bike....all the lessons are there for you to learn and most people do learn them perhaps a bit slower, but they are all learnable....

    Hell lots of suspension bikes of what amounts to a rigid lockout of the suspension so there you go again.
    The best analogy I can come up with here is that this is like comparing sailing a little catamaran and and giant fixed keel yacht. You can learn a lot about tying knots by sailing either one of them, but that's not what we're talking about. The little catamaran is going to teach you a lot more about actually sailing. Yacht skills are not going to help your little catamaran skills nearly as much as little catamaran skills are going to help your yacht skills. As for how to get on and off of the boat...yeah, you basically just step on. Those lessons are readily available no matter what kind of boat it is. But again, not what we're talking about.

    Riding a rigid bike will make you way better at riding a full suspension bike than vice versa. As for shifting and using clipless pedals...you can learn those skills in a spin class. We're talking about actually riding.
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobby12many
    Thats pretty much exactly what they are 230g 6K carbon low rise bars with integrated aero/accessory mount extensions. The extensions are much more conducive to hand positioning than accessory mounting though....

    Bontrager Satellite Elite Carbon Trekking Handlebar
    630MM Width
    50MM Rise
    9 degree bend


    A few more pics that show them a bit better:
    https://i.imgur.com/5TVCL.jpg
    https://i.imgur.com/oGJxc.jpg

    the extensions are incredibly comfortable
    Thanks for the pictures.

    Those extensions remind me a bit of the Cinelli Spinacci bars from the mid 1990s. They were quite good. That looks like it should be a rapid commuting bike.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwork
    this argument could be taken one step further--

    riding a fixed gear rigid will take those skills one step further, but maybe i sound like i'm playing devil's advocate here. I agree with jeffscott. riding any bike will improve your riding. riding certain styles of bike will get you "closer" to the bike, and make you more aware of what is going on underneath you, but riding is riding.

    just do it.
    Riding a 8" fixie down mt everest without front brake on radially spoked wheels takes it a step further too.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

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    Specialized sucks ass.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy
    The best analogy I can come up with here is that this is like comparing sailing a little catamaran and and giant fixed keel yacht. You can learn a lot about tying knots by sailing either one of them, but that's not what we're talking about. The little catamaran is going to teach you a lot more about actually sailing. Yacht skills are not going to help your little catamaran skills nearly as much as little catamaran skills are going to help your yacht skills. As for how to get on and off of the boat...yeah, you basically just step on. Those lessons are readily available no matter what kind of boat it is. But again, not what we're talking about.

    Riding a rigid bike will make you way better at riding a full suspension bike than vice versa. As for shifting and using clipless pedals...you can learn those skills in a spin class. We're talking about actually riding.
    I learned on a rigid mountain bike. Please send the fullsuss for a controlled experiment.

    I believe you are correct on the sailing...my friend that teaches people to sail ( learntosail.net ) says it is harder to sail a small boat than a large one.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304
    Thanks for the pictures.

    Those extensions remind me a bit of the Cinelli Spinacci bars from the mid 1990s. They were quite good. That looks like it should be a rapid commuting bike.
    I have since narrowed the bars and removed the optical displays from the shifters enabling me to move them further inboard.

    The extensions paired with the downward stem length make for a nice and relaxed "tucked" position.

    Should be nice when climbing in wind... we will see

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobby12many
    My commuter lands somewhere in between....


    and I think that is the perfect commuter
    That's a sweet ride.

    I ride a SS with slicks and fenders during the winter, but if the weather is halfway descent, skinny tires on a 34 mile commute is much easier. Guess I have ridden road bikes enough that I don't have too much trouble navigating road hazards.

  38. #38
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    trail setup: 26" Monocog with rigid fork, meaty tires, and 32/20 gear ratio.
    street setup: same bike with 32/16 ratio and 2.2 Race Kings @65 psi
    alternate setup: old steel hybrid with 700x28 wheels, flat bars, and 1x8 drivetrain.

    the mtb is sooooo much more fun on the street.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobby12many
    My commuter lands somewhere in between....


    and I think that is the perfect commuter
    this is pretty ideal

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy
    The best analogy I can come up with here is that this is like comparing sailing a little catamaran and and giant fixed keel yacht. You can learn a lot about tying knots by sailing either one of them, but that's not what we're talking about. The little catamaran is going to teach you a lot more about actually sailing. Yacht skills are not going to help your little catamaran skills nearly as much as little catamaran skills are going to help your yacht skills. As for how to get on and off of the boat...yeah, you basically just step on. Those lessons are readily available no matter what kind of boat it is. But again, not what we're talking about.

    Riding a rigid bike will make you way better at riding a full suspension bike than vice versa. As for shifting and using clipless pedals...you can learn those skills in a spin class. We're talking about actually riding.

    Well in the end I keep saying that riding a rigid bike will improve your bump absorbing skills...more quickly than a full suspension bike.

    The cat versus keel yatch is also a vast generality that is just about worthless, and is off point.

    As far as learning about shifting and clipless on a spin bike that is just plain STUPID.

    The intricasies of riding up a mountain side with clipless pedals on the verge of passing out, while cleaning difficult obstacles...does develop shifting skills far better than the spin bike, and any road riding....same with managing clipless pedals when you have to bail...

    So again a rigid bike will help improve your bump abosrbing skills faster than a full suspension but that is about it.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc
    Any bike commutting is faster and better than any bike in the garage/house/appartment. Ride what you own. Oh, and the best bike depends so much on the environmnet you ride in and the rider that it changes with a move or age. If I could I'd have a bigger stable and the best bike would change with the weather.
    Where is the Like Button?
    :~)

  42. #42
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    My favorite Commuter Bike

    Seattle and Flowers by normbilt, on Flickr

    My Favorite Mountain Bike

    Sundays Ride by normbilt, on Flickr

  43. #43
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    I was faster on my roadbike, that is for sure. 17.5 miles in 37 minutes was my best time on the roadbike, I think 44 minutes was my record on the mountainbike. Hard to say now, though, I have been unemployed for a while, and I might be a faster rider altogether now, seeing as I have had metric craploads of mainly uphill training time to ride ride ride ride without much of a purpose other than recreation and fitness in mind.
    Donít frail and blow if youíre going to Braille and Flow.

  44. #44
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    I like my cyclocross bike for commuting.

    I like it best with 700x30 - 700x35 tires.

    And fenders. Yeah.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  45. #45
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    This is my mount . . . . . .

    i mean lets be honest mountain bikes are probably better and faster commuters-diamondback-wildwood.jpg

    With this Baby, I average about 11 miles per hour. I do have great acceleration but I have to say, there is some rolling resistance. And when I factor in head wind, boy it's quite a chore keeping the pace. When I do encounter folks with their road bikes, for the most part they're moving faster than I am.
    Sometimes dudes on their bikes take me on and depending on who it is, I'll take em on too! But if I see that it's a dude with a road bike, then the odds are against me. I'm not even going to try. Unless we come across vehicular traffic and we have to dodge into and out of cars, then I might be able to hold my own.
    I live in New York City so I travel mostly on asphalt. These tires make up the suspension that I need for those occasional pot holes. I've seen dudes on their road bikes either get on a side walk or slow down considerably while I plow onward on a coble stone street. . . .

  46. #46
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    There is a way to win over road bikes, you just cheat and go over lawns/stairs/take a shortcut where the roadies can't go since their bikes will just vapourize when they attempt to.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by car bone
    There is a way to win over road bikes, you just cheat and go over lawns/stairs/take a shortcut where the roadies can't go since their bikes will just vapourize when they attempt to.
    There is a HUUUUUUUUGE difference between a dedicated roadie and a mountain biker on a road bike.

    I love riding with the "full kit" roadies, bunnyhopping a curb or trackstanding at a stoplight, and having them tell me "you can't do that". F-you and your SaxoBank kit, I'll wear baggies, a visor helmet, and full finger gloves and you can tell me you're on a rest day after I have to wait for your roadie ass at the top of a climb.

    Regaredless.....If I commute on my MTB, I get distracted too easily with side trails through the greenspaces and what not, my 25 minute commute ends up taking 2 hours.

  48. #48
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    You should print up a jersey saying "powered by Amgen mother****er" just to **** with them http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amgen for fun.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by car bone
    You should print up a jersey saying "powered by Amgen mother****er" just to **** with them http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amgen for fun.
    I would rather have "America, **** yeah"

  50. #50
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    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  51. #51
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    One of the things I realized when I started riding with teams - there are two kinds of full kit roadies. The ones in Saxo Bank or other pro team jerseys - yeah, you probably don't need to take them seriously.

    Watch out for the ones wearing a local shop or team, though. Competitive racers are a lot more likely to treat their road bikes like the pieces of sporting equipment they are, and you never know when the guy on the carbon feather road race bike is someone who specializes in MTB or 'cross. Guys riding on teams are maybe not required, but "asked" to wear their full kit whenever possible - that's what the sponsors get out of giving money and other considerations. And there's another incentive - for many, it's the best deal they can get on cycling clothes; for a few it's even free. I have to admit it's also kind of fun - for me, it's a way I can recognize people I race against on the weekends. It's not a big community, and we almost always have something to say to each other even if it's just, "See you next Sunday?"

    Especially watch out for a guy with hairy legs, two different years of local team kit, and a bike with a few hard seasons clearly visible. He won't even notice he's owning you.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  52. #52
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    This is what a commuter is to me. I also prefer a 29'er for riding around town. I like a more relaxed position, slower steering and a more sturdy and confident frame for townie stuff. Previously, I was riding a CX bike but I really hated it in fast corners, stair drops and the occasional dirt adventure. I don't ride road bikes anymore so I see no reason to ever subject myself to drop bars. 29'ers are sweet in an urban environment and is probably the most adaptable platform available.



    This bike looks a bit different now. A few component changes have been made and an unsatisfactory rear rack has been installed. Still looking for the right rack. The Bontrager I bought is not it.

  53. #53
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    ^^^
    Are those eyelets on the right chainstay for mounting a rack?

    I had one mounted on my commuter with the chainstay eyelets and a single stay to the brake bridge for a while. Several months ago, I switched to two stays to P-clamps on the tops of the chain stays. It's actually much better, even though it's not actually bolted to the frame there any more. The rack itself is pretty cheap, but I think they don't have to be that expensive if they attach to the bike in four places.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrbigisbudgood
    ....I love riding with the "full kit" roadies, bunnyhopping a curb or trackstanding at a stoplight, and having them tell me "you can't do that".
    I would hazard a guess that trackstanding was developed at the ...uh...track

    Although my nephew did some track and apparently it was frowned upon when he bunnyhopped another rider who went down in front of him.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch
    ^^^
    Are those eyelets on the right chainstay for mounting a rack?
    Makes it easier to mount a full fender AND a rack.

    What frame is that Schultz?

  56. #56
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    Get a hybrid, best of both worlds.

    Redline 925 was the sweet spot for me.

  57. #57
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    Roadies aren't a real friendly crowd. just say'n.

    on the other hand, they are justified in frowning upon activities which contradict the ethos of "sharing the road," which is to say when they see guys doing stuff cars aren't allowed to do without being cited for reckless driving (how would you track stand in a car?!) because hazardous riding styles create animosity between motorists and cyclists...

    Not like we care about what motorists think anyways, stupid jerks.

  58. #58
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    29er's As Commuters?

    [QUOTE=Schultz29]. . . . . . I like a more relaxed position, slower steering and a more sturdy and confident frame for townie stuff. Previously, I was riding a CX bike but I really hated it in fast corners, stair drops and the occasional dirt adventure. I don't ride road bikes anymore so I see no reason to ever subject myself to drop bars. 29'ers are sweet in an urban environment and is probably the most adaptable platform available.

    That's one fine looking machine.

    And the very points you mentioned are what I'm looking for in a bike. (Not just a commuter) My only issue with your mount is that I can't use such a machine out here (NYC) as a commuter. Too many eyes and hands you know. Before I would know it, it's gone. It has happened before. So my goal is to get exactly what you described for personal use and nothing more! The commuter can be, ah . . . . what it is, a means of getting from point A to point B. But at the same time, it's got to meet at least some of the criteria that was highlighted.

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by nazaright
    And the very points you mentioned are what I'm looking for in a bike. (Not just a commuter) My only issue with your mount is that I can't use such a machine out here (NYC) as a commuter. Too many eyes and hands you know. Before I would know it, it's gone. It has happened before. So my goal is to get exactly what you described for personal use and nothing more! The commuter can be, ah . . . . what it is, a means of getting from point A to point B. But at the same time, it's got to meet at least some of the criteria that was highlighted.
    That frame is a Lynskey Ridgeline as another poster asked. I removed all decals so the bike would be a bit more inconspicuous. I also had Lynskey add rack and fender mounts as well. I had a rack installed recently but removed it and the fender for a the Summer season. Here's a pic in it's latest configuration.



    I am not a NYC resident but I was there for a few days last year to ride the 5 Boro. I spent 3 days just riding in the city. It was some of the most exciting and aggressive riding I've ever done. A bike is definitely the fastest mode of transport in New York.

    I that very short time, I get a feel for the city and gave "big city life" some thought when building this new bike. I studied every bike I saw and took lots of pictures. I agree, you must go low profile and low cost if you're building a bike for NYC. Theft is a big issue, every bike I saw had lock and chain that outweighed or out priced the bike it was securing. Where I live theft is not as much of a concern but it is rare that I leave my ride unattended. When I was in NYC, I rode my Redline Monocog. It a reasonably priced bike and has very cozy geometry. I stole most of it's sweet parts for the Lynskey but recently I built it back as a single speed with stuff in my parts bin. If I go back to New York next year, I'll be taking this bike. Gears are not necessary in New York either but I need them at home. Here's the Redline after building it back. I think it would be a good candidate for the city, if it only had provisions for a rack.


  60. #60
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    Is there a "like" button feature?

  61. #61
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    Some of you guys have pimp commuters! When I think of commuters, I think of a beater, aesthetically deficient so as not to attract attention.

    Getting to work in style!

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by dixie whiskey View Post
    Get a hybrid, best of both worlds.

    Redline 925 was the sweet spot for me.
    i agree that the 925 is a sweet bike. simple, sturdy & versatile...but it is certainly not a hybrid.

    got mine set-up right now as a fast urban fixed gear...potholes, grass or dirt, hop some curbs, jump some steps? no problem!
    i throw on a seatpost rack & regularly do a 30 mi round-trip commute on it. have run fenders & paniers in the past but i just prefer sportier.

    best of all, it can take pretty wide tires so with cx tires & lower gearing...sometimes just for shits n giggles i will take it out on many of the same trails i ride my mtb on.

    like just about everybody else on mtbr, am always looking for an excuse to post a pic:


  63. #63
    What It Be ?
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    I like my RedLine Conquest with fenders 35c tires and fenders.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwork View Post
    Roadies aren't a real friendly crowd. just say'n.
    There are too many like that in every endeavor. Some are not. So, like me, like it here.

    Sartre: L'enfer, c'est les autres. Loosely: Hell? It's other people.

    Quote Originally Posted by jwork View Post
    on the other hand, .. (how would you track stand in a car?!) because hazardous riding styles create animosity between motorists and cyclists...Not like we care about what motorists think anyways, stupid jerks.
    A driver track stands by stopping. A three or four wheeled vehicle is stable without balancing. Track standing a loaded panniered Hawg, now that would be hard. So to my mind track standing IS doing something that is exactly analogous to normal car behavior, if harder. I mean, drivers don't open their doors and put a foot down when stopped at traffic lights, do they? We are not required to have turn signal lights and many other 'inequalities'.

    Being predictable is a great help to drivers. Being aware of a bike's speed and placement is a great boon to us. My estimation is about 1% are stupid jerks, another 4% oblivious, and maybe another 10% are just lousy in a car or on a bike. They are just more dangerous in a car. Except the high school kids. Ask CB for percentages. Me? I avoid them like they are the Satan's Choice armed with chains on a vendetta against cyclists.

    BTW you can't be fast commutting if you get hit. I detect a significant improvement in sharing the road from drivers the more upright my position. Sheldon had a two bar bike, flat bars above road drops. Flats when you hit city and need to be seen sooner and better and the drops for the open road where the wind comes sweepin' down the plains? Not for weight weinies though.

  65. #65
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    Sweet Ride !!

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobby12many View Post
    My commuter lands somewhere in between....


    and I think that is the perfect commuter
    Awesome set up ! What's the handle bar / tyres you have on it ?

  66. #66
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    ... and if we just ...


    Totally can relate this video to the topic !

    Encore!
    2008 Specialized Stumpjumper Expert Carbon
    • OEM Spec

  67. #67
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    faster? no.
    better? depends; is part of your criteria to get to work faster?

    unless the terrain somehow warrants it, there's nothing an mtb can do on the road that a roadie can't do faster, more precisely, and with less effort required by the rider (as they're generally lighter to begin with).

    horses for courses, ya don't run a clydesdale at the track and ya don't strap a purebread pony to the draught wagon.
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  68. #68
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    What a stupid thread, I'm surprised it made it past page 1.. .or even 1 reply...
    Draft College Republicans

  69. #69
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    that's a surprise? you new here?

    yo momma... and the horse she rode in on!
    when i was your age... you stoopid noob!
    well maybe if you were riding a (insert your band of preference here) you'd be as fast as me!

    welcome to the terrordome!
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  70. #70
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    I just got this Sirrus Expert. I wanted something that emulated my mtb bike set-up for handling with the quickness of a road bike. Got it used in pristine shape. Since this pic, I reversed the stem to -8ļ and added a carbon bar. It gets locked in my office, front wheel off with a Kryptonite lock and heavy cable to the desk, during the day. I'm going to put a rack on the back as I carry enough stuff to make the weight on my hands uncomfortable.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails i mean lets be honest mountain bikes are probably better and faster commuters-esirrusexpert81411.jpg  

    I don't rattle.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schultz29 View Post
    This is what a commuter is to me. I also prefer a 29'er for riding around town
    Your bike looks similar to my Trek Soho! A couple of questions:

    I went to a 1x9 setup but on occasion will drop my chain to the outside (never the inside). I've figured out how it happens and and can mostly control it, but it just happened last week and I was annoyed.

    In any case, I see your chainguard. I have the same SLX chainset and have had trouble finding a decent looking chainguard in 44T. Yours looks smaller than that, but what model is it? I ordered a driveline one but don't like how it looks on my bike.

    Also, what fork are you using?

    Thanks!

  72. #72
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    Nice handlebar bell you got there!

    Due to abominable conditions of the streets where I live, I can't ride anything but nobby tires.

  73. #73
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    It's nice to have both

  74. #74
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    tenth post

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrbigisbudgood View Post
    Makes it easier to mount a full fender AND a rack.

    What frame is that Schultz?
    Lynskey Ridgline with frame and fender mounts.

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsilva View Post
    Your bike looks similar to my Trek Soho! A couple of questions:

    I went to a 1x9 setup but on occasion will drop my chain to the outside (never the inside). I've figured out how it happens and and can mostly control it, but it just happened last week and I was annoyed.

    In any case, I see your chainguard. I have the same SLX chainset and have had trouble finding a decent looking chainguard in 44T. Yours looks smaller than that, but what model is it? I ordered a driveline one but don't like how it looks on my bike.

    Also, what fork are you using?

    Thanks!
    The frame is a Lynskey Ridgeline with frame and fender mounts. The fork is a Niner carbon with carbon steerer tube. The fork only weighed a little over a pound but is razor sharp when cornering. However, I have very little faith in carbon fiber but it does perform well and it looks nice too.

    As for 1x9, I've been riding my dual/sport mtn bike that way for a few years now. I run a 36t up front and a typical 11-34 rear cassette. I use a 36t bash ring on the outside and a Jump Stop on the inside. It has worked great for me. The front gear is a little small but I can usually keep pace with my buddies but sometimes I have to spin wildly in flat sections. I'd like to move up to a 38t up front but am afraid I'll loose some climbing ability? I ride this bike a lot in the mountains on long steep climbs.

    Finding a bash ring for a 44t may be challenging but I recall Salsa offering something for their CX components but it may be 5 bolt cranks only? Another option, may be a Paul Chain Keeper. I have a friend that uses one on his 1x9 and swears by it. You might check into that too?

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