I Crashed at a railway crossing.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    I Crashed at a railway crossing.

    First of all excuse my english since it's my third language. Anyhow, as the title says, I crashed at a railway crossing last night on my way home. The fact that my front tire got caught in the rail and flipped me over. It also didn't helped while being clipped in. All I can remember that my chest first landed on the ground then front part of my helmet saved my face. My right pinky finger felt so numb. I initially thought that it got dislocated since my right glove on the knuckle part has some scratches. I've crossed the same railway crossing a hundred times but this was the unfortunate moment for me. On the other hand, my bike took the beating since both of the brakes mineral cap got broken and was also leaking. My lights also took a beating since one of my lights power button went missing. Good thing that I was still able to pedal back home.


    My dilemma right now is that my rear brake doesn't function anymore. I called my LBS today and informed about the accident and they told me that they can order the brakes. I was also wondering if I can just purchase the brakes online and install it myself since my LBS would charge me for the labor. I've checked the specs of my bike online and it says the brake system is Shimano M446 hydraulic disc brakes w/Shimano hydraulic levers. Amazon has this particular brake system for $57.73. I was wondering if this is the right thing to do or just let my LBS do its job and save myself from all the hassle.

    P.S. Would I be able to install a different Shimano brake system that is already pre-bled and at the higher end.
    Last edited by Iwanttorideatnight; 03-24-2012 at 04:31 AM.

  2. #2
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    As long as your disc rotors are straight after the accident, you should be able to remove the damaged brake and install a new Shimano brake in its place with little effort.

  3. #3
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    I noticed that on my way home after the crash. The rotor on the front tire is already rubbing against the brake pads. I should be able to adjust the caliper later and true the rotor. I was wondering if the rotor would be compatible with a higher category Shimano brakes aside from the stock brake system that comes with my bike when I purchased it? Anyhow, I checked the front brake and it seems like its functioning but it's quite banged up. Would it be possible that I would just install a different brake system for the rear and just retain the front brake as is?

  4. #4
    Teen Wolf
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    Sorry to hear, sounds painful and scary

  5. #5
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    yes

    yes to all you questions. check out the brake time and tool time forums as well.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iwanttorideatnight View Post
    I noticed that on my way home after the crash. The rotor on the front tire is already rubbing against the brake pads. I should be able to adjust the caliper later and true the rotor. I was wondering if the rotor would be compatible with a higher category Shimano brakes aside from the stock brake system that comes with my bike when I purchased it? Anyhow, I checked the front brake and it seems like its functioning but it's quite banged up. Would it be possible that I would just install a different brake system for the rear and just retain the front brake as is?
    Yes on both counts.

  7. #7
    weirdo
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    Wow, you really hit hard! Out of curiosity, how fast were you going? I take it you crossed the tracks at a narrow angle? I know nothing about disc brakes, but it sounds like you`re getting the information you need. Your hands are okay? And your light still works? Good luck getting everything back ship shape.

  8. #8
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Why don't you just buy new brake levers? If money's an issue, this is going to be the least expensive option of all.

    Take the bike to your LBS first. Shimano makes some maintenance and repair parts available, so you may not even need to replace both levers.

    Sorry about your wipeout. Railroad crossings are very annoying. You need to unweight your wheels as you go over them regardless of angle, and it takes some finesse to cross safely as you get further away from a 90 degree angle.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Out of curiosity, how fast were you going? I take it you crossed the tracks at a narrow angle? Your hands are okay? And your light still works?
    I really don't know what my speed was prior to my crash since I don't monitor my speed. I guess I was moving in a fairly descent speed, the fact that I got catapulted several feet away from the rail where my tire got stuck. My hands are okay but I got bruises on my left elbow and right knee. The light still works and the manufacturer will send me the replacement power button.

    @ AndrwSwitch, I'll take my bike to the LBS on monday and see if there is a mineral oil cap available. My main concern is my health and so far I'm still in one piece and last but not the least I still get to see my 8 month old daughter
    Last edited by Iwanttorideatnight; 03-25-2012 at 12:55 AM.

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