How to not loose motivation?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    a lazy pedaler
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    How to not loose motivation?

    (Please If there is another thread about this..point it out)

    So guys...I read the Winter Commuting Cheat Sheet (good info btw)...but I haven't read anything about motivation....how to not loose it during the winter?

    This will be my first commuting winter and today was one of the coldest mornings since the cold start to show up...I haven't bought the proper gear so I had the perfect excuse....but for when I buy it...

    ...how do you guys fight the need to stay in your warm bed and use that hour you need to commute to just stay there and avoid the cold commute?

    today I took the wife's car to get here

  2. #2
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    Want to stay motivated?

    loose the car.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinsillo
    (Please If there is another thread about this..point it out)

    So guys...I read the Winter Commuting Cheat Sheet (good info btw)...but I haven't read anything about motivation....how to not loose it during the winter?

    This will be my first commuting winter and today was one of the coldest mornings since the cold start to show up...I haven't bought the proper gear so I had the perfect excuse....but for when I buy it...

    ...how do you guys fight the need to stay in your warm bed and use that hour you need to commute to just stay there and avoid the cold commute?

    today I took the wife's car to get here
    Why not u take a break and cycle when winter end?

  4. #4
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    @Shimano4

    I really don't want to stop commuting....is just that this morning was so easy to take the decision....and I'm not happy about it.

    @rayhead00

    I started commuting on March...sold the motorcycle I used to come here in May...but losing her car is just not an option.

  5. #5
    ...a wiggle theres a way
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    i really suggest the right gear because it will make commuting a pleasure rather than a chore. I rode monday trying out the amfib (waterproof/windproof) tights i just bought and the sorel boots, and honestly i can't wait til the weather gets crappy - will i commute the full 23miles to work on those days no, but i'll ride the 4.5 to the train, and than the 1.5miles to work from the drop point.

    I also stay motivated by knowing that i am doing actual riding, and that come spring i will be faster/stronger out of the box than most of the other riders that i ride with, plus on occasion i will be quicker than cars to the same location, and you get a ton of high fives and sweet baby jesus you ride your bike in this from people. plus riding in fresh snow after a storm is pure pleasure!

    joe

  6. #6
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    x2 on getting the right gear. When you get new stuff you want to try it out.
    For me, there is a point every year when it starts getting cold that I question whether I can/should/will be able to pull off riding through the winter. But once I'm in the routine of it, the days just slip away and I realize that I'm almost back into the daylight and warmth.

    I would suggest:

    -New gear, as mentioned. Get the gear for the temps you'll be riding in, and you can eliminate the misery and actually enjoy the ride.

    -New bike parts, they motivate me to ride

    -A bike that you really enjoy riding (Building my commuter bike from scratch was a major motivator for me to ride it every day)

    -Keep track of your 'driving days'...this winter may be the first, but you'll want to do better next winter, and the winter after that... nothing like keeping track of your days to motivate you to stay out of the car.

    -Reward yourself. Donut? Coffee? Spot of tea and a scone? Whatever floats your boat.

    -Make it a habit. Once you ride all the time and drive rarely, driving becomes a bit of a nuisance. Your keys, phone, clothes, etc all find their way into your daily riding routine and getting all of your 'parts' in and out of the car and back into their proper place in your backpack/panniers/whatever for the ride tomorrow is a pain. You will prefer riding once it's your primary mode of transport.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  7. #7
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    Yeah for me making it a routine works best. Set your gear up the night before so you wake up put on your gear and go.

    A warm bed is nice, but you can warm up quickly if you push yourself on your commute. =]

    Which leads to another fun thing to do, try and decrease your commute time by riding harder and beating your commute time from the previous day.

  8. #8
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Last winter, I rode my bike most days and drove my car every now and then, typically because I was taking an off-bike day after a 'cross race, because I was taking an off-bike day before a 'cross race, or occasionally due to failures in motivation.

    Driving in Seattle really pisses me off. Drivers here don't know how to merge. Whenever I drive during rush hour, I get to my destination agitated. When I ride my bike, I get to my destination in a good mood. That motivated me a lot.

    When it snowed here (will it snow where you are?) my truck became a really poor mode of transportation. It's a 2WD pickup with the drive wheels in the rear, so without chains it's terrifying in snow or ice. The roads are poorly cleared here when it snows but not so poorly cleared I can just chain up and forget about it, and shadows can be very dangerous. On my mountain bike, however, riding through the streets to work was one of the most awesome things I've ever done.

    And I'm too proud to ride the bus.

    I think that once you get into the habit of commuting on your bike, you'll find that knowing you'll arrive in a better mood is a good motivator. Make sure you're adequately dressed - I don't know how cold your area is, but here in the winter I need wind resistant tights, shoe covers, a windbreaker over a long-sleeved jersey or base layer, full fingered gloves, and sometimes a hat that covers my ears.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  9. #9
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    @CommuterBoy

    yeah you are right, I think part of my motivation lost is due to gear, bike parts, bike inclusive...

    The bag for my rear rack has always been undersized, and if I want to deal with the winter gear plus office clothes I certainly need to upgrade that one.

    The bike is a thing...I'm building a Pugsley after taking the decision between a commuter specific or that build...due to $$ issues and parts availability the pugs is not going to be ready until February I think....plus I spend what I had left upgrading the wife's bike (http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=572262)..so although I'm happy for her...I'm kind of frustrated with my bike or bike setup if you will...changing tires between commuting days and weekends really sucks..yesterday I had to commute with my offroad tires couse I forgot to do it the day before....

    I'm thinking about buying an old Rockhooper (90 something) that my LBS has just to have something new...I have a great Idea for my commuter ride but just don't have the money now.

    Rewards?...mmm haven't thought about that...good point.

    hehehe I track almost every ride hehehe is kind an obsession

    @joshed

    yeah...right know my times are too in the average section of my records...will try it....if I can do better times is also a way to stay in bed a little longer!

    @AndrwSwitch

    Here (Monterrey, Mexico) I won't see any snow or any extreme cold as you may have...may be 4 to 8 C in cold mornings is what I will see...... I'm from Caracas, Venezuela...an extreme cold morning there will be around 12 to 16C....although this will be my second winter here..is my first on a bicycle. .

    you are right about the mood after a ride....I found myself more waked up when I get to work after my morning commute compared to when I do it on the motorcycle or the car.

  10. #10

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    To build on what Joshed said, I can clearly tell how much fitness I have lost if I skip commuting for a couple of weeks. I record every ride on my Garmin and upload into Connect which makes tracking performance/fitness levels throughout the year very easy. Setting new records and improving times is great but in the depth of a cold, nasty winter I will settle for just not losing my fitness level.

  11. #11
    jrm
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    Crosstrain

    in the winter sometimes commuting is the only riding i can get in due to the weather. I look to the weather and plan my commute and weekend ride days round it. it also doesnt hurt to mix it up the intensity-duration of your commute. Some days i could ride but dont ill go to the gym and lift or run. On other days when the weathers questionable ill get off the bus further from my house and walk the remaining 2 or 3 miles home.

    Bottom line keep it eclectic during the winter months.. it keeps me from burning out..

  12. #12
    ride the moment
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    These are all great suggestions. I'd say go ahead and buy that rockhopper and put some 26in slicks on it. It never hurts to have an extra beater-bike in the stable in case you want to take someone out for a cervesa As others have said, driving makes me angry and riding makes me happy. I've got warm clothes and a solid commuter so its really no question.

    One more note on staying motivated... when all else fails I look at the money I'm saving. Don't just think about gasoline either, as routine maintenance and depreciation add up too. The IRS standard mileage deduction for business travel is $0.55 per mile. I commute 65-75 miles per week so that's $35-40 in my pocket. I drive a cheap car with good fuel economy so I might not be saving quite that much but whatever.
    Hey Butthead, are we gonna die? - Beavis

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogbrain
    One more note on staying motivated... when all else fails I look at the money I'm saving. Don't just think about gasoline either, as routine maintenance and depreciation add up too. The IRS standard mileage deduction for business travel is $0.55 per mile. I commute 65-75 miles per week so that's $35-40 in my pocket. I drive a cheap car with good fuel economy so I might not be saving quite that much but whatever.
    Great point! I had my car in for the 20K service last week - that was $780 before they started. New front brakes, new rear tires, and a 4-wheel alignment later I was up to $2,800. I could build myself a very nice cyclocross based commuter for that kind of scratch.

  14. #14
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    tell me about it...just after selling the motorcycle I paid a debt and had the money to build me a bike (in that moment I was going for a commuter for sure) but what happened? the refrigeration system of our car failed...$1,000 plus a couple of taxis...bicycle dream gone.

    @Dogbrain

    I'm going to the lbs today to check winter gear...will take a look on the rockhooper

  15. #15
    The Brutally Handsome
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    I'm prepared to be blasted for suggesting this . . . but when I start to loose motivation I start listening to a book on my ipod. Reason?

    First, unlike music, when all you're hearing is words you can still hear what's going on around you so it's safe.

    Second, you get into the story and the ride goes by very fast.

    Third, you look forward to riding again so you can pick up the story where you left off! This has gotten me through some tough commuting times.

  16. #16
    weirdo
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    I had the perfect solution until I read that you`re in MTY. I was going to say to leave the bike inside and park the car on the street. There`s nothing I hate worse than scraping a frozen windshield and I would probably ride my bike to the moon in order to get out of it! Otherwise, I say the "good gear" plan is the best bet. If you don`t use it after spending all that money, the vieja will scramble your eggs.
    Recalculating....

  17. #17
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    Don't be a *****.

  18. #18
    Did I catch a niner+?
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    Great motivation is looking in the mirror and seeing the pounds shed (this is assuming you have some weight to loose).

    pink

  19. #19
    a lazy pedaler
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    @Sizzler

    actually that doesn't sound too bad to me

    @rodar y rodar

    you can bet on that

    @umarth

    my english is not good enough to fill in the blanks...I'm just going to guess that should be funny

    @Mr Pink57
    20 pounds gone so far..and at least 20 more that need to go too
    Last edited by martinsillo; 11-18-2009 at 09:33 PM.

  20. #20
    weirdo
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    Actually, good gear doesn`t have to cost a lot. As long as you don`t buy stuff intended for bicycling it`s pretty cheap. Just remember layers, avoid cotton, keep it loose enough to move but no so loose that it acts like a big parachute. You might get some good ideas on Icebike.
    http://www.icebike.org/
    Recalculating....

  21. #21
    The Brutally Handsome
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    As long as you don`t buy stuff intended for bicycling it`s pretty cheap.
    guiding principle for all my bike gear!

  22. #22
    Hail Satin!
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    Well the best way to not loose motivation is to not make commuting a chore. Riding your bike to work or where ever should be fun. And you just can't have fun riding on cold mornings in a driving rain.
    Sometimes you ride sometimes you drive. As for gear? look into snowboarding clothes. Little pricy sometimes. But hey. Now you have an excuse to go snowboarding.
    In the great Ford vs Chevy debate, I choose Porsche.

  23. #23
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    @rodar y rodar
    @Sizzler

    cheap gear! that's what I need...please enlighten me...what to get or where to go?

    I already bought an Under Armour tight that I'm using under my baggy shorts, those I like, I probably get another one.

    For the upper section, I certainly will need more layers, my t-shirts are too summer specific....I bought a Canari "Windproof" Jacket, and although is not the best, I think that if I combine it with other things I won't get too chill.

    I will also need new gloves and a shoe cover...I think I can't help it and those I will get it at the lbs.

  24. #24
    weirdo
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    Aside from NOT buying at a bike shop or from a bike equipment internet vendor (a few things I buy like that, but not many), timing helps a lot. A jacket that should cost $60 will be marked $180 at a sporting goods or outdoor specilty store in January. When they start getting rid of their winter inventory to stock summer clothes and summer sports stuff, they`ll drop the price a little at a time until it`s gone and if you hit it right you might find it for $20 to $40. SIerra Trading Post and REI, among others have very high regular prices, but killer sales. I don`t think they`ll help you outside the US, but you might have somebody in TX or NM who you can ship to. Thrift stores (la segunda) are handy because they carry stuff all year at great prices if you start to get cold before most places have cold weather clothes in stock. Otherwise, see what you can find at Walmart, Coppel, Farmacia GDL, etc.

    Your Under Armour tight is probably similar to what I wear this time of year under my shorts or pants. I go from just shorts to shorts + long johns (tights), then use the same long johns with light nylon pants, then go to heavy polyester "old man" pants over my long johns when it gets really cold. None of that is bike clothes and it was all cheap.

    On top, I use just a plain old shirt when it `s warm (or hot), then add a light polyester jacket (awesome no-name jacket that even has pit vents and a back vent- found it used two years ago) when I need to. Next, switch from the light jacket to a zip up fleece jacket (bought on sale at REI), then both, finally a Goretex parka shell (paid full price at Cabelas many years ago- probably close to $100) over the fleece jacket. That combo keeps me warm down to zero F.

    Gloves- no gloves in the summer, first step either regular bike gloves (I always get the cheapest I can find at my LBS when I wear out the pair I had before) or poly gloves from the supermarket. Next, supermarket gloves under heavy duty gardening gloves from Home Depot or Walmart. Finally, down mittens (I got them on sale at Cabelas and they were still rather expensive, but they work great). I don`t know if you`ll be able to find real cold weather gloves in MTY or if you`ll have to order them, but I do fine down to ~20F with my supermarket gloves and gardening gloves combo.

    Feet- I don`t have clips and cleats pedals on my commute bike, so whatever shoes and socks I need I wear. I use anything from tennies to hiking boots with one or more pairs of socks. Nothing for my feet is bike specific. Coldest combo is thin socks + heavy wool socks + hiking boots. I suppose the next step would be plastic bags over the boots, but I`ve never needed to go that far.
    Recalculating....

  25. #25
    a lazy pedaler
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    wow...thanks!!

    will go and visit some of our stores here and see what cheap combos I can get...

    yes we can find some good cold specific stuff on our LBS...the gloves I saw that will work for me (Pearl Izumi Cyclone I think) are about $45...but yours is the second Home Depot gloves recommendation I get since I start riding....will go and see (I live 3 blocks far from one)....I also thought about using a pair of gloves that I used when I had the motorcycle, but those do not let the sweat get out at all...now that the cold is coming I probably will sell those fast.

    After your recommendations I think the only thing I'll get from the lbs are going to be the shoe covers....I like going with my bike shoes.

  26. #26
    weirdo
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    Oh, I forgot headgear. It`s simple for me. When my ears start to get cold, I use a thin balaclava that I got at a sporting goods dealer (full price, but they`re cheap). Next step is a knitted watch cap (look for thin ones because most are too thick to wear under a helmet) either with or without the balaclava. Final step for me is a pair of "frog" goggles from the motorcycle section in Walmart. They do help me keep warm, but they fog up so bad that I only use them when it`s really cold. I`ve never tried those ear warmer bands, but they look tempting too and they`re not expensive. I`ll probably get one sooner or later.

    You might find some nice cold weather gloves at your LBS, but I`ve never found any bike specific gloves that really kept my hands warm. Then again, I haven`t tried many.
    Recalculating....

  27. #27
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    My head system consists of a very thin beanie, an ear warmer band from pricepoint, and a thin balaclava from REI (their thinnest).

    I wear the ear warmer at mild temps, then switch to the beanie when it's a bit colder. I recently started wearing the ear warmer over the beanie, because the beanie lets air flow up around my ears, and the ear warmer seals out all the drafts.
    When it gets really cold I wear the thin beanie under the 'clava...mostly because I DESTROY my hair trying to put the 'clava on by itself. I'm always twisting it around and stuff, and found that even with short hair, the beanie holds things in place when I'm struggling to get the 'clava on straight.

    I tried a thicker 'clava, and it was horrible. Ice builds up, you can't breathe, it's too hot... the thin one allows some air to escape, doesn't freeze up becaue it dries quickly, and still provides just enough to keep the bite off of the face down to about zero degrees F.

    I got the Pearl Izumi lobster gloves last winter...they're pretty good down to very low single digits. I still got the numb fingers at about zero degrees. Best gloves I've tried other than my snowboarding gloves though. They are more windproof than my snowboard gloves. I'm a one-finger braking guy though, the lobster finger thing took a little getting used to. I don't mind it at all now though.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  28. #28
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    @rodar y rodar

    I think that for the kind of cold I'll get.... the Cyclones will be enough but I'll try to go cheap this winter

    @rodar y rodar
    @CommuterBoy

    I think I'll get a very thin balaclava for our temps I won't need more than that...I also have a half-face one that I used with the motorcycle, but is the same...that will be too much for the bicycle ride.

    thanks guys

  29. #29
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    Gloves.......checked

    I got my "less than 9 USD" combo from Home Depot yesterday!

    I got a pair of thin multi-use gloves and a pair of heavy duty ones.

    Using both it feels a little weird on the handlebar. The heavy duty ones are kind of bulky, they didn't have to many options so I took the ones I felt more comfortable with.

    This morning the cold wasn't that bad so I use the thin ones under my regular gloves (Sidewinder Fox) at some points I even felt my hands extra warm. I think I'll stick to this combo until I felt the necessity for the heavy duty's

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy

    -Reward yourself. Donut? Coffee? Spot of tea and a scone? Whatever floats your boat.
    Reward yourself! Go beyond this if you can... new bike bling, better tires, great lights, nifty wheels, a new bike!

    You can justify it now. Though maybe not specifically motivating, it feeds the passion and is a part of the sport and commute that I enjoy.

    I generally don't need motivation as I'm a glutton for punishment and love to grind it out on the way home after work, rain or shine. But my consistent commute helped justify the purchase of a Cannondale Bad Boy White Edition Solo Ultra after a few days of thinking about it.

    http://de.cannondale.com/bikes/09/ce/model-9BS8W.html

    G.

  31. #31
    a lazy pedaler
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    G... That bike looks gooood!

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinsillo

    I think I'll get a very thin balaclava for our temps I won't need more than that...I also have a half-face one that I used with the motorcycle, but is the same...that will be too much for the bicycle ride.

    The thin one that I have is easy to pull down over your chin so your whole face is exposed. When it's really cold It covers my mouth and just leaves the nose and eyes exposed, but it stretches enough to easily hook over the chin on a 'sort of really cold' morning...then it acts like a beanie/ear warmer/neck warmer. I roll like this quite a bit.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by rayhead00
    loose the car.


    Should he "loose" the car or LOSE the car?

  34. #34
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    I really hear you. I hate getting out of bed. It's just the way I am. But once I'm up I wake up quickly. My wife helps out by starting the coffee maker and pours me a cup while I'm getting into my rain gear.

    Does anyone else you work with bike to work? If so, start a grudge match. It works for me. On those days when I just don't feel like riding I just think about having to explain why I didn't and having to make up an excuse. Usually, I'm one of the few people who rides every day in the cold sloppy Oregon weather we have here. In fact, it's become a matter of pride. People admire what I'm doing and say so. Every little bit of encouragement helps. It also helps that after a year of 30 miles a day I can wear all my old pants.

    Having a bike that is fun to ride really makes a difference. I've spent a lot of money this year on really nice bikes. The result is twofold...I enjoy riding and I feel guilty if I'm not using the bike I spent so much cash on.

    FWIW...I started commuting on a converted mountain bike and went through half a winter that way. It was misery so I switched to a real road bike (cyclocross, actually). It works MUCH better for the long highway miles I am doing.

    Keep track of your miles. There are websites for logging your trips. It's nice seeing a month of commutes. Here is the one I use.
    http://bikecommutechallenge.com/ (It's an annual competition but the website is open for logging rides year-round)

    Oh...folks were mentioning places to get clothing for riding. I got some medium weight 100% polyester long sleeve shirts at Ross for about $6 each. They get stinky like any polyester shirt but they will help to keep you warm under your rain/wind jacket.

    On the subject of warm clothes, the most awesome new thing I started using is actually very old technology. For my birthday at the beginning of this month my wife got me a Sugoi merino wool long sleeve undershirt. Holy crap that is amazing! Doesn't get cold and clammy when it's wet, doesn't itch, very light weight...just amazing. Very expensive, though. About $75.

    One last comment...avoid lycra. A polymer chemist (and cyclist) where I work has done tests on lycra, spandex, polyester, etc. and has found that lycra is hydrophyllic. That means it holds on to water. Water will not stay in a polyester shirt but a lycra shirt will stay wet for hours. Just check the label when you are buying stuff.

    Good luck and enjoy the ride!!

  35. #35
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    @Tweezak
    "Does anyone else you work with bike to work?"

    Man...I think I'm the only guy who by choice (and not by necessity) commute by bike in the entire city...I even started a thread on the subject in the Mexico Forum....just one guy, of the few who post, told me he commute to his work every other day. (he lives like 20hrs by car from here)

    People is just not interested, and have a lot of reasons to not be...not having government support, people driving crazy, not having shared roads, etc...I really don't blame them.

    when I started my commutes I did some research....on the government "road plan" for the next 15 years the words "pedestrian" and "cyclist" together appear like 5 times...none in an important sentence of course.

    My commute fellows are workers who, as one told me one day, do it because they need to save the money they spend by taking the bus.

    Thanks Tweezak....sorry for the ramble is just that you touch a nerve there.

  36. #36
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    on the other hand...

    yeah...having a nice bike or a good gear makes the difference...the other night when I bought my cheap Home Depot gloves I was anxious to commute the next day!

  37. #37
    weirdo
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    Martincillo, how long is your commute? Just wondering.

    Also, you might be interrested in a site that one of my friends maintains:
    www.ciclismochihuahua.com
    Although it used to be Chih specific, he has info on a lot of events in northern Mexico, such as mtb road races. Since he got married this year, he isn`t spending as much time on photo reports from his club rides and MOST of the site is now special event info.
    Recalculating....

  38. #38
    a lazy pedaler
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    @rodar y rodar

    is not too long actually...7 miles each way
    Last edited by martinsillo; 11-22-2009 at 10:28 AM.

  39. #39
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    The BEST motivator is to lighten the bike as much as you can, even if you just buy a new part each month. Not only will you develop an appreciation of high-quality components- but a lighter bike will have you riding it faster, each time you throw a leg over it.

    My commuter started out as a 31 pound boat anchor, that I dreaded to ride even on the best weather days. I went on a weight weenie project over the course of one year and the bike is now a 19 pound ROCKET. Maintaining 22 mph on the bike is almost effortless now and road cyclists are amazed when I blow by them.

    Commuting USED to be a chore...not anymore. The entire experience was 110% fun and I do not regret all the big $$$ I spent on it!!!





    NOTE: Bike is no longer my commuter...the project inspired me to compete this in XC racing now.
    Last edited by Cayenne_Pepa; 11-22-2009 at 10:07 AM.
    "This is a male-dominated forum... there will be lots of Testosterone sword-shaming here" ~ Kenfucius

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah
    The BEST motivator is to lighten the bike as much as you can, even if you just buy a new part each month. Not only will you develop an appreciation of high-quality components- but a lighter bike will have you riding it faster, each time you throw a leg over it.

    My commuter started out as a 31 pound boat anchor, that I dreaded to ride even on the best weather days. I went on a weight weenie project over the course of one year and the bike is now a 19 pound ROCKET. Maintaining 22 mph on the bike is almost effortless now and road cyclists are amazed when I blow by them.

    Commuting USED to be a chore...not anymore. The entire experience was 110% fun and I do not regret all the big $$$ I spent on it!!!
    Sweet Ride Zach!!

    I did sort of the same thing but went pure road because my commute was mostly highway. For $1650 I got this. I think it's about 17 pounds and is a blast to ride as well as being extremely comfortable.



    As a comparison I have over $2000 invested in my mountain bike (Salsa Moto Rapido frame) and it's still in the 26 pound range (with dirt tires).

    I guess the point I'm trying to make is that it can be less expensive to buy a complete bike than build it up from scratch. I built several used bikes up and it always cost more than I expected...besides...I never knew when I was done until I changed out the frame on the last one (Trek 8000 --> Salsa) but that was the last remaing old part.

  41. #41
    I Tried Them ALL... SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tweezak
    Sweet Ride Zach!!

    I did sort of the same thing but went pure road because my commute was mostly highway. For $1650 I got this. I think it's about 17 pounds and is a blast to ride as well as being extremely comfortable.


    As a comparison I have over $2000 invested in my mountain bike (Salsa Moto Rapido frame) and it's still in the 26 pound range (with dirt tires).

    I guess the point I'm trying to make is that it can be less expensive to buy a complete bike than build it up from scratch. I built several used bikes up and it always cost more than I expected...besides...I never knew when I was done until I changed out the frame on the last one (Trek 8000 --> Salsa) but that was the last remaing old part.
    I like your Orbea very much. Here is my 16.5 pound commuter now...

    "This is a male-dominated forum... there will be lots of Testosterone sword-shaming here" ~ Kenfucius

  42. #42
    a lazy pedaler
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    man, I'm at the office right now, almost full work weekend for me, I even had a plan for a nice ride yesterday .....can't see Zach's pics from here...firewall blocks any sharing website..flickr, photobucket, etc.

    My plan is to finish the pugs project and then go for a commuter project

  43. #43
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I hate you guys! My commute bike's not too heavy, but it's a mid-80's 12-speed and if it doesn't weigh much it's because it doesn't have too many cogs or chain rings and downtube shifters are lighter than STI levers. It's not too light either.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  44. #44
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    @Tweezak
    @Zachariah

    now I can say it...both of you have really nice bikes....I probably won't go for the superlight bike for my commuter....our streets are not too safe to have one, large holes, large rain drains...... I will need big wide tires for sure, but definitely will be a beuty...I want to try SS...now I'm leaned towards a 1x1..so lightweight is out of the equation.

  45. #45
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinsillo
    is not too long actually...7 miles each way
    No, not too long, but it`s twice as long as mine.

    Zachariah and Tweezak- Shazam! The lightest I have is ~25 LB. I test rode a Jamis Zenith once (don`t know the weight, but under 20 I`m sure). It was fun, but not my gig. I wish they could be made feather light and still not look like George Jetson`s bike.
    Recalculating....

  46. #46
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    As long as I have a gut, I'm motivated.
    If I achieve a trim waist line, I will need to review this thread again.
    "I don't suffer from insanity!I rather enjoy it."

  47. #47
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    is not about motivation anymore!

    ... now I have plenty! (part of my new year resolutions)

    disregarding the smoke thing...my morning commute was awesome!

    Street were wet but no rain was involved....front fender flawless I got into the puddles on purpose and they did the job.

    Today the rear setup wasn't so good...as you see I normally take a small bag with my breakfast and lunch on top of the trunk bag...today I didn't so my back got wet buuuttt! MTX Defender is on its way!...with my food there I really needed, I know...but before this I wasn't doing rain days.

    I also order a new taillight adding some lumens on the back

    Booties: Flawless...they repel the water and actually kept my feet a bit warmer

    Gloves: I think it was because I was riding harder today (I was late also reason for not taking my lunch!) but I felt them a little over-warmer, actually when I took them off my hands were a little bit sweaty (is guess that is not normal)...they had other PIs in the shop but this ones were the only ones that claimed to be waterproof also...anyways they kept my hands warmer...did the job...

    Yesterday I decided to add one mask I used to use with my motorcycle, the one I talked about earlier:
    Quote Originally Posted by martinsillo
    I think I'll get a very thin balaclava for our temps I won't need more than that...I also have a half-face one that I used with the motorcycle, but is the same...that will be too much for the bicycle ride.
    I wasn't right at all, first it was a full mask from shampa and second It wasn't too much for the bicycle ride...it was great!

    Finally to increase my motivation....my boss call me to her office when she saw me in the morning, she was, as everyone here, very concerned about the weather for the next couple of days here, was something like this:

    boss: Martin you are not going to come here on your bike tomorrow right?
    me: yes, I will, I even bought the gear yesterday so I won't miss my commute rides.
    boss: but Martin you don't have the necessity to expose yourself to that, you have a car...use it.
    me: is not about necessity, I chose to ride, and I bought the gear.
    boss: nahh that was just an excuse to buy things..use your car. (hehe she knows me, but this time she was wrong)
    me: boss I chose this and I need the gear to ride comfortable...(added something about how you guys ride at worst conditions and..)...you were supposed to encourage me instead. (then changed to some work related subject)
    Leaving the office:
    boss: Martin do not come to work on your bike tomorrow please.
    me:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails How to not loose motivation?-home-alone_010410_013.jpg  


  48. #48
    I'm SUCH a square....
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    I guess I don't have that problem; the only thing I like better than riding is sex. And since there's no specific lady around willing to help out with that, I just ride.
    A bike is the only drug with no bad side effects....

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinsillo
    ... boss: Martin do not come to work on your bike tomorrow please.
    me:

    It's amazing what people will come up with! Yesterday a coworker was sure he had it all figured out...I must be bikecommuting because I had a DWI...I assured him I did not, that I had my license, but liked the bikecommute - but I'm sure he was googling my name on the "police blotter" news as I left his office.

  50. #50
    weirdo
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    Hmmm... It sounds to me like Martin`s boss told him to take a day off. She must really like his work and wants to thank him for all he`s doing!
    Recalculating....

  51. #51
    a lazy pedaler
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    ... and if we just ...

    If the conversation had been longer...

    me: I...
    boss: do what you want, you know you have to be here tomorrow!

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinsillo
    (Please If there is another thread about this..point it out)

    So guys...I read the Winter Commuting Cheat Sheet (good info btw)...but I haven't read anything about motivation....how to not loose it during the winter?

    This will be my first commuting winter and today was one of the coldest mornings since the cold start to show up...I haven't bought the proper gear so I had the perfect excuse....but for when I buy it...

    ...how do you guys fight the need to stay in your warm bed and use that hour you need to commute to just stay there and avoid the cold commute?

    today I took the wife's car to get here
    no car = no choice ...
    or have you ever seen breaking away ...that dog would get you goin...

    seriously though ..it ain't easy some days ...but you just have to decide to get up and go ...
    ______
    "thirty spokes converge upon a wheel but it is the hole in the center that enables it to be used"

  53. #53
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinsillo
    boss: nahh that was just an excuse to buy things..
    SO?!?!
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  54. #54
    a lazy pedaler
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    testing...

    My setup today:

    feet: thin and thick socks (not that thick) , mtb shoes and the booties.
    legs: UA tights and the baggy shorts.
    Top: long sleeve "moisture wicking" base layer from gap, another one but cotton and the canari jacket.
    face/head: the mask and a helmet cap from UA.
    hands: the multiuse thin gloves from HD and the PIs.

    this morning the T was around 44F, so yes I was overdressed (I felt it) but I needed to test the setup for the supposed 28-32 F we are going to have...as I felt it...I think this setup will work...(I did brought a second jacket just in case )

    The only issue will be the rain and my current lack of waterproof pants hopefully the rain stays as drizzles

  55. #55
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    If I'm going to be changing anyway, I don't try for waterproof pants - just tights that will stay warm. Right now, depending on how bad the weather is, I have fleece tights or I wear a pair with heavier, windproof and water-resistant front panels.

    A set of fenders makes commuting on a wet day much more comfortable as well.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  56. #56
    Bedwards Of The West
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    So your boss is concerned about your health and safety if you're out there on the bike at 28 degrees? How does she think people survive north of Texas?

    Good to hear the the new gear is a good motivator. I would expect that over time your bosses concern will turn into respect if you stick with it. I am the only idiot at my job who rides through the winter, and after 5 years of people realizing that it's a choice I've made to challenge myself and keep myself healthy, I get an enormous amount of respect for it. People ask "you didn't ride today, did you?" when it's down near zero, and when I say yes, they shake their head and say something about comittment or discipline, and how I have more of both than they do. .

    I have been accused of having my license revoked too People try to be sensitive about it.. "how come you ride your bike? Can you...you know, not use your car?" Some people will just never get it...
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  57. #57
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    hehehe That's what I told her...In fact...she has family near Chicago....but I guess is about being outdoors...people just don't get it....in the conversation I also told her that the first thing I saw when I went to DC for Christmas was this woman getting in the airport with the proper gear and her bike (old road bike SS converted)...I think DC was around 20 after the snow storm (I arrived the 23)

    the new gear is a good motivator as you guys recommend me on this thread and as you said, screwing with people minds at the office is too, hehehe...I already got some of "you didn't ride today, did you?" type of questions.

    My intention is to ride this couple of rainy and "super cold" days...that way, I just will ran out of bike/gear related excuses

    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy
    So your boss is concerned about your health and safety if you're out there on the bike at 28 degrees? How does she think people survive north of Texas?

    Good to hear the the new gear is a good motivator. I would expect that over time your bosses concern will turn into respect if you stick with it. I am the only idiot at my job who rides through the winter, and after 5 years of people realizing that it's a choice I've made to challenge myself and keep myself healthy, I get an enormous amount of respect for it. People ask "you didn't ride today, did you?" when it's down near zero, and when I say yes, they shake their head and say something about comittment or discipline, and how I have more of both than they do. .

    I have been accused of having my license revoked too People try to be sensitive about it.. "how come you ride your bike? Can you...you know, not use your car?" Some people will just never get it...

  58. #58
    a lazy pedaler
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    people is getting serious...

    so in my way home I saw lot of people checking out their water gauges outside their houses...the thing is, here (as in most of the Latin American countries) you have your water, electric power and gas gauges in front of your house...so pics talk by themselves:

    last one is the best...this guys wrap better their gas pipes (which is not needed to wrap!)
    Attached Images Attached Images    

  59. #59
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    my setup...

    I did the calc, if we reach the 28s for a couple of hours and there is no running water on my water inlet as it won't for like 10 hours well it will get icy icy!!...so this is my setup I knew those frame protections would be useful.

    I think the gauge doesn't need any...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails How to not loose motivation?-cold-mty_010710_039.jpg  

    How to not loose motivation?-cold-mty_010710_046.jpg  

    Attached Images Attached Images  

  60. #60
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinsillo
    I love it! I don`t suppose Gigante carries a very big selection of heat tape or pipe insulation, so a great example of Mexican "makeitworkism", AKA "Hazloquepuedas"

    You should be a lot better off with your insulation, Martin. Another helpful tip that you might keep in mind in case you ever get a short unexpected cold snap that you don`t have time to prepare for is to let one faucet drip a little bit over night. I suppose that news has already been circulating, but just in case....
    Recalculating....

  61. #61
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    hehehe yes I probably let one drip a little...but I don't know I'm starting to think this is a media scam hehehe

    Ps..Soriana bought Gigante

  62. #62
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    I was watching man vs wild the other day and watched him plunge into a frozen body of water in the arctic circle .. naked. Any slight amount of cold/inconvenience I've encountered while commuting now is always better than that.

  63. #63
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinsillo
    Soriana bought Gigante
    I guess I`ve been North of the border too long. Wish I had the money for a nice long trip.

    Did you get any rosca?
    Recalculating....

  64. #64
    a lazy pedaler
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    Morning commute was excellent I left home with 37.4 (feeling 26) and arrive here with 33 (feeling 21), my setup works just fine

    well last night I forgot to bring the gloves inside the heated room, so half of the way my hands were a little chilly

    first thing from people getting out their cars: "Dude, you are crazy"....

    @rodar
    well it wasn't too long ago...I was already in Mexico...I think Mid-Sept 2008, one Monday morning all the billboards were changed

    Rosca was Tuesday dinner and Wednesday and Thursday breakfast for me...great with Cafe con Leche!! well..I don't like the little dry fruits they put on top of it hehehe but that's me.

  65. #65
    Bedwards Of The West
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    Wow, all those wrapped pipes remind me of when I lived in LA and they used to issue 'frost warnings' on the evening news. Bring your pets inside! Cover your plants! Protect your children! FROST!!!! MID 30's!!! Stay at home!

    I start worrying about the plumbing after a few solid days where the HIGH temp doesn't get above about 25. Of course we don't build our houses with exposed plumbing like that either...
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  66. #66
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    People can be Funny

    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy
    .

    I have been accused of having my license revoked too People try to be sensitive about it.. "how come you ride your bike? Can you...you know, not use your car?" Some people will just never get it...
    So last night I figured I could be funny too:
    On bus, getting off with bike for 3.5mi uphill, about 15 degrees F...
    Guy getting off bus: "do you ride that thing year round??!!"
    Me: "Naw, just in winter"

  67. #67
    a lazy pedaler
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    Good job! I did it!

    is official...first whole week on the bike...5 days and 10 rides on our coldest days!

    I think that if keep this rhythm it I will reach my 2000 mi this year easily...63mi per week per 11 months = 2773 mi

    no weekend rides for me this one...I'll stay at home healing...I've been with a kind of flu since Wednesday, from that first rain on Monday....my voice is on its lower tone and some cough is kicking in...I think they wasn't that wrong calling me crazy!

  68. #68
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    I am glad to see i'm not alone to commute all year long (by choice)....I'm also the only one out of 1500 people...Also get some weird comments sometimes, once a guy was telling me that i was doing to torture myself!!!Also got the D.U.I., been called stupid, etc..... I think they just want to justify their lazyness.

    Tell your boss you have a friend in Montreal that commutes through ice and snow at -25C/-13F!!!!!!

    I am just in shock with all that cold weather talk, for me, anything above freezin is just a breeze.The smallest dinkiest gloves, very thin jacket, maybe something to cover the ears (headband) and eye protection is all i need...I only have 6.2km(~4 miles) to commute, so it's more like a short sprint.

  69. #69
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I'm always shocked at how much people in Seattle layer up to ride bikes here. Our winter does occasionally drop below freezing, but on days in the 40s or 50s, I'll see people wearing balaclavas, tights, heavy jackets, and heavy gloves or pogies. I get sweaty just looking at that much clothing.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  70. #70
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    I think is about getting used to the weather...I think 40s and 50s are summer temps for some people hehe.....as I said I got my hands sweaty with the new gloves...getting the perfect gear I think (and heard) is a matter of time, trying stuff....for me here is that you'll never see this temps in Vzla unless you go to The Andes.

    I just want to ride more!....now that I got the gear that will allow me to commute the whole year I'll focus on finish the Pugs an then a Commuter Bike ..hopefully by this time in a year I'll be talking about the build

  71. #71
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    Wink new helmet light!

    as I'm getting a new taillight here is what I'm going to do with the old one
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails How to not loose motivation?-cold-mty_011010_049.jpg  


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