How Much Do You Save Commuting?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    How Much Do You Save Commuting?

    If I take a taxi to work it's $20 each way. If I get a ride from co-workers I usually kick in $15-$20 a week for gas. Riding in is free and only downside is I get out of bed @ 35 minutes earlier. What does it cost you to get to work if you don't ride?
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  2. #2
    Bedwards Of The West
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    Including what I'd be paying a psychologist?
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  3. #3
    CB of the East
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    Enough to justify any and all reasonable bike related purchases including bikes.

    I keep track of how much I save in straight gas savings based on the roughly current gas prices and the gas mileage of my car. This is a good concrete number based on direct out of pocket money. ($722 so far in 2012)

    I also use the standard federal mileage rate of $0.56 which gives a much higher number.($2102 so far in 2012)

    Of course I don't keep track of bike expenditures, that would be pointless.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    Including what I'd be paying a psychologist?
    Psychologist or psychiatrist? Although the only difference I've seen between the two is prescriptions and $200 an hour.
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  5. #5
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    Well I just ordered a few parts that I needed...but bumped up the order with a few more things that I wanted (I'm paying shipping to Canada anyway, so I might as well make the most of it). And I think that was my 3rd parts order of the year? And I kindof want to treat myself with a new frame, and might cave sometime this winter.

    But I don't pay for transit ($85/mo), or insurance (~$100/mo?) & mileage (~$150/mo), or the gym (~$65/mo).

    So best case would be 85+65=$150/mo = $1800/year.

    I'm way below that, even with a couple of bike purchases, and a couple of silly parts, and summer and winter wardrobes. (and transit would take a lot longer than riding) Driving would be nearly $4k a year, plus buying a second car which isn't going to happen.
    Last edited by newfangled; 09-17-2012 at 09:39 AM.

  6. #6
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    Since I'm only saving about a gallon of gas a day, my wife is pretty sure we're actually spending more keeping me fed than we would be on the gas. But I don't feel shitty at the end of every day like I do when I drive.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sanath View Post
    Since I'm only saving about a gallon of gas a day, my wife is pretty sure we're actually spending more keeping me fed than we would be on the gas. But I don't feel shitty at the end of every day like I do when I drive.
    Me too. I definitely am hungrier all day riding than driving. Plus the fact that I'm a gear whore means I'm definitely in the hole. It's worth it for the exercise and reduced stress though.

  8. #8
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    Another gear whore here, so my savings are most likely in the negative range. I have no doubt that I COULD commute comfortably by bike for less money than I would spend to drive, but I really doubt the math works out in my case. I just do it because I like it. And because I like the goodies that it gives me a feeble excuse to buy

  9. #9
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    I just switched jobs, my old commute was $1200/year by car. Now I have half the commute and I take my bike 3 days a week. That puts me at $200/year in gas, so I am saving $1000. Plus we have free lunch at the new place which is ~$2000/year in savings.

    So my net is ~$3K to switch jobs

    And when the fall hits and daylight savings kicks in, our tuesday night Ride & Imbibe goes into hiding, so I will not be driving on tuesdays, so I can commute four days a week.
    Austin Mountain Biking and worldwide travel pictures:

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  10. #10
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    I kept track of my cycling expenses for a few years just to see how much $$$ I was putting into it. Long story short. It almost made me sick until I thought about how much better I feel mentally and physically. Besides if I wasn't dumping that money on a bike it would be going somewhere else who knows if that other thing would be good or bad.

    But back to the point... I don't commute much, actually not much at all, but if I only factor in the fact that I would have both a bike & and vehicle regardless if I commuted or not and don't count anything but the day to day expense then I'm saving less than $5/day. But on days I commute I mentally feel like I'm save hundreds. I envy people that can commute everyday. There just isn't any way I can do that
    กuʍop əpıs ɹəqqnɹ əɥʇ dəəʞ ɹəqɯəɯəɹ กกกpəɥsɐɹɔ əʌɐɥ ʇɥƃıɯ noʎ sıɥʇ pɐəɹ uɐɔ noʎ ɟı

  11. #11
    jrm
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    The way i see it

    When i ride to work Im saving $.20 wear/tear/fuel x 15 miles round trip to/from work each day. Then there's the $10 a day to park per day.

    We're encouraged to use transit otherwise. We get back 65% of our transit costs to and work, meetings and the like.

    i dont have a car payment, and sure wish i could save more on insurance for driving less then 10k per year. But every so often i just wanna or need to drive in so ill absorb the cost.

  12. #12
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    Saved enough to write a check (vs financing) for a car the other day now that I cannot currently ride due to getting hit by a car a month ago. It was supposed to be a vacation fund but it's nice to be able to build up a cushion for whatever might come up...

  13. #13
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    Commuting by public transport (train + bus) costs € 11,36 per day
    Driving = 92km round trip = 5,7 litres = € 10,20 just for gas per day.

    I don't keep track of my bike expenses, but my commuter is an SS road bike built almost entirely from old parts from my nice road bike, so it doesn't cost me that much.
    Ride more!

  14. #14
    CB of the East
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    You commute 92km round trip on a SS

  15. #15
    Swedetarded
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    Considering that I don't even own a car............

  16. #16
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    Using the $0.56/mi for driving cost, it costs me $3.92 to drive to/from work in a day. On days where I'd drive home for lunch (face it, I was too lazy most days to make my lunch and bring it with me), It'd cost me $7.84/day. Using the higher number (when I drove, more often than not I'd drive home for lunch), I get $1,999.2 for a year of driving (assuming 255 driving days per year).

    To be completely honest, my car gets 30mpg in town and is pretty cheap to maintain so the actual number is probably less than $0.56/mi. Gas alone in my car costs $0.12/mi at the current $3.74/gal prices in town. I did buy tires for the car in the past year, and I'm due for a 40,000mi service/oil change.

    I built my expensive commuter bike about a year ago for around $1,500. I haven't spent any more money on it since then. At this point, I'd be breaking even if I stopped driving the car to work altogether. Which I don't. Riding the bike does make me feel better, and with my busy schedule making it difficult to fit ride time in, commuting is how I get my miles so I'm in shape for when I DO have time to hit the trails (like this weekend, I'm making a trip with some friends to ride a trail I don't get to very often).

  17. #17
    Wierdo
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    I'm ignoring the initial investment in bicycle, clothes, gear because that can be substantial. This is more of a "steady-state" analysis.

    On the straight cost of gas alone, I have not spent about $760 dollars, year-to-date.
    Add to that an oil change the car did not need, and various other car maintenance items that I was able to forgo, let's call it $900 year-to-date saved.

    I can add another savings: Because I don't drive our second car to work every day, we converted it to a "pleasure vehicle" on our insurance policy, saving another $300/year.

    On the expense side, I've spent about $300 on "supplies", replacement clothes that have worn out (new cycling jacket, replacement socks) and parts for the bike (lube, cables, chain, batteries, new rear derailleur).

    Hard to factor in the extra food. I do eat more but how much more? No idea.

    So I am likely money ahead. My mental and physical health are way ahead.

  18. #18
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    factoring out initial purchase cost puts me ahead, even considering that I didn't bike to the office at all for 3-4mo to avoid the heat.

  19. #19
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    I live in the country with the most expensive cars in the world.
    Car = Cost of car + 100% Tax + COE (10 year entitlement to own a car, somewhere between $60K to $80K), 2% over 10 years for the loan' looking at min $200K for getting the car (cheap one) alone. Factor in road tax ~ $1K per year, Fuel at $8 Gallon, ERP - $2 per day, (Electronic Road Pricing - Everyday Rob People, as the taxi drivers call it), parking at $8 per day - roughly looking at $30K per year $2.5K per month. $100 min per day - takes 30mins in rush hour traffic
    Taxi's for my 12Km each way commite work out at $15 per trip $30 per day - takes 30 mins in rush hour traffic - $600 per month
    Public bus / Transit $4 per day - takes well over an hour each way but very good service - $80 per month.
    Bike commute - 30 - 40mins.
    Public Transport roughly $880 per year - New Cross Check every year
    Taxi - New top of the range Scalpal every year
    Car - New Venge McLaren - every 8 months
    The temp maxes out at about 85' and never drops below 65' all year round - needless to say I don't need or want a car and the wife / kids are quite happy to cycle or get the bus to school / shops etc. If I need a car to go away for a while I just rent one in the neighbouring country where it is 1/5th price. So my savings are about $29,500 per year. I don't sweat about spending a bit on gear when I feel like it or need it.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by SimpleJon View Post
    I live in the country with the most expensive cars in the world.
    Car = Cost of car + 100% Tax + COE (10 year entitlement to own a car, somewhere between $60K to $80K), 2% over 10 years for the loan' looking at min $200K for getting the car (cheap one) alone. Factor in road tax ~ $1K per year, Fuel at $8 Gallon, ERP - $2 per day, (Electronic Road Pricing - Everyday Rob People, as the taxi drivers call it), parking at $8 per day - roughly looking at $30K per year $2.5K per month. $100 min per day - takes 30mins in rush hour traffic
    Taxi's for my 12Km each way commite work out at $15 per trip $30 per day - takes 30 mins in rush hour traffic - $600 per month
    Public bus / Transit $4 per day - takes well over an hour each way but very good service - $80 per month.
    Bike commute - 30 - 40mins.
    Public Transport roughly $880 per year - New Cross Check every year
    Taxi - New top of the range Scalpal every year
    Car - New Venge McLaren - every 8 months
    The temp maxes out at about 85' and never drops below 65' all year round - needless to say I don't need or want a car and the wife / kids are quite happy to cycle or get the bus to school / shops etc. If I need a car to go away for a while I just rent one in the neighbouring country where it is 1/5th price. So my savings are about $29,500 per year. I don't sweat about spending a bit on gear when I feel like it or need it.
    Singapore, I presume? that's insane. but for being such a small and densely populated country, I can understand why.

  21. #21
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    This is kind of a running joke in our house. I probably save somewhere around $2,500 a year in gas and car related expenses. The problem is that my annual bike related expenses are a multiple of that. The incremental expense of riding my bike to work probably doesn't come anywhere close to what I save. The problem is that riding to work got me in better shape and more into cycling. I have gone from two to six bikes and travel around the country for different races and events.

    Still, it replaces something I hate (driving to work) with something I lover (riding my bike), which is why I bike commute. It would be very hard to get the same number of hours in the saddle if I drove to work.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    Singapore, I presume? that's insane. but for being such a small and densely populated country, I can understand why.
    Correct, the really insane thing is that the roads are as jammed up as any city in Europe or the US with private vehicles, people still buy them. Public transport is not perfect but pretty good, cheap and efficient. The good thing is with the Govt making so much cash out of taxing cars (and supplying most of the loans through Govt owned banks), it helps keep income tax very low.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    You commute 92km round trip on a SS
    Round trip by bike is only 75 km. + I don't ride to work every day.
    Ride more!

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by junior1210 View Post
    If I take a taxi to work it's $20 each way. If I get a ride from co-workers I usually kick in $15-$20 a week for gas. Riding in is free and only downside is I get out of bed @ 35 minutes earlier. What does it cost you to get to work if you don't ride?
    If I take a taxi to work its about 100€ and if I take the bus for a month its 150ish €. unfortunately or very fortunately for my health the bus only goes like once a day there but I can get half way there and ride the rest. So thats my choice. Save money? I don't know about that really, I could get a cheap ass car and run it cheaper than bus and bike. Bike hobby alone is like mucho. But its my passion, transport, interest and hobby so its worth it.

    I ran the numbers a few years back and calculated that I could pay the fuel for a VW lupo 3l (0.3L/10km diesel) and drive to and forth to work (40km one way) and it would have been cheaper than the train. The train was about 80€/month then.

    Now I make considerably more money and feel kinda spoiled, And if I were to get a car now it would have to be a newish Bmw with v8 or a Benz with v8, can't have it any other way, so now I save a considerable amount of money by riding, I don't know, about 40-50k€ and thats just the entry ticket, not including the use or ownership cost of such a toy. Because thats what it is to me, a toy, I don't need it, but my bike(s) is a toy too. Don't really "need" them either. But I like owning ****!

    Bike = several k€

    Car = 50k++€ (and automatically being forced to run the hamster wheel for life, like "normal" people do)

    A healthy long life living free, no hamster wheel, no ****ing nothing = fukcing priceless.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

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    Specialized sucks ass.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by junior1210 View Post
    Psychologist or psychiatrist? Although the only difference I've seen between the two is prescriptions and $200 an hour.
    One is a real doctor that can prescribe meds and the other one is more a consultant that recommends a hospital or some type of other establishment a med that they then prescribe for you, or a real doctor with a medical doctor degree prescribes for you. Its about if they have the power to prescribe you meds or not, here at least. One is not a real doctor and the education is different supposedly. I happen to know one. The non doctor kind. Can't remember which one is which though.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  26. #26
    I'm SUCH a square....
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    Not including the cost of the car (that I don't have anymore), since what I pay for my bike(s) pretty much cancels that out, I can figure insurance/registration/gas/tuneups/oil changes/other maintenance. Rounding off, I save about $3.50/day by not driving. Not taking the bus would make that $2.50/day.

    PL/PD -- $35/mo.
    gas -- $40/mo.
    registration -- $35/yr
    oil changes -- $30, 2-3x/yr.
    This comes close enough to $80/mo. to call it; the rest, brake jobs/tires/etc. could easily make up another $20. So, $100/mo. total. Close, $3-3.50/day.

    I will admit, probably a third of that goes right into my belly, since I eat WTF I please because I ride.

    So, ANY form of motorized transport would cost me a couple bucks+ a day; rather save THAT, AND my sanity, by pedaling!
    A bike is the only drug with no bad side effects....

  27. #27
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    I only live a mile and half from work, so its even more sinful to drive from a karmic standpoint. But being so close I also get to go home for lunch. Assuming I would otherwise eat out at least occasionally I would factor that into my savings as well. I also try to run all my work related errands by bike which I can usually do. Mostly I am going to City offices and they are all within 3-5 miles. So, more savings. And then sanity as has been mentioned.

    For such a short commute, I don't spend much on bike upkeep. Just time primping my ride. And I ride the road bike to work (which is pretty nice but nothing fancy) so I can keep the mtb in prime shape. That's more savings!

    But the main payoffs for me are moving my body around, waking up, winding down at the end, and giving me a jolt of energy around lunch.

  28. #28
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    When I started commuting by bike I owned two cars, but after a couple months I sold my second car and pocketed $6800 cash. So that was a definite bonus .

    I still drive some days when I have to run errands or cart kids around to school. Work commute is 7 miles round trip. So monthly expenses I save each month:

    Insurance on 2nd car: $50/month
    Gas: $30/month (would be more if I could commute 100% of the time)
    Oil: $50/year
    Reg: $180/year
    Maintenance/Repairs: ???? (it was a 2004 Honda Civic, so pretty reliable)

    Total: $99.16 per month!

    So it's a pretty significant amount, especially if you can manage to reduce the number of cars you have or eliminate them altogether. And of course the morning and afternoon riding therapy is priceless. Even if you don't get to see dirt all week, you can at least get out on two wheels and stretch your legs for a couple hours.
    "Got everything you need?"

  29. #29
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    I ride 5 days a week. 6 miles one way. @ .58 that's $1579 a year. I drive probably 10 days a year when I have to, so really probably an even $1500 per year. My commuter was bought in early 2007 for $600. Some gear but honestly I don't put much money into the commuting gear or bike as I've got it pretty covered. So, for the bike in it's 6th year of service and still going strong I think it's paid back nicely. Plus, if I didn't ride to work I'd have to find time to exercise before of after work. That costs in time and maybe money too. Additional cost savings is i almost always bring my lunch, which is way healthier as well.
    Work to Ride - Ride to Work
    There's no such thing as bad weather, just bad clothing...

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sanath View Post
    Since I'm only saving about a gallon of gas a day, my wife is pretty sure we're actually spending more keeping me fed than we would be on the gas. But I don't feel shitty at the end of every day like I do when I drive.
    I don't associate increased food costs to commuting. i would exercise somehow anyway. I do associate an extra 1/2 hour or hour savings a day for turning my wasted commute time into exercise time.
    Work to Ride - Ride to Work
    There's no such thing as bad weather, just bad clothing...

  31. #31
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    I think it might be safe to say very little to nothing. I have a first-gen Honda Insight CVT that gets ridiculous mpg. Last tank yielded 64mpg in mix city/hwy driving and a total of 643 miles on a tank. When it was a lot cooler months back I commuted almost every workday and would commute as much as possible, but the downside of a hybrid is that it doesn't like to sit for long periods of time because it's not good for the battery. So some days I would drive to work or find some reason to drive (hate to drive without a destination--total waste). I think I have saved more money with the hybrid than my bikes. Spend too much time and money upgrading. Total dork.

    On the upside, I've impressed my work crush...she said so herself! *swoons*

  32. #32
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    Full disclosure

    I started commuting by bike March 5th. the below list is the best I can remember.
    $348 = bike $850 - $502 for bike I sold to buy new bike.
    +120 Breathable rain jacket
    +89 breathable rain pants
    +45 gore windstopper gloves
    + 35 helment cover
    +104 rechargeable head light light
    +20 tail light
    +35 fenders
    +35 reflective stuff for bike
    +89 for teva pinner shoes
    +$15 for breathable material I used to make shoe covers.
    +$15 for gloves
    +$29 for NRS gloves
    +35 for rack
    +89 for panniers
    +15 for mirror
    +59 for lock and cable
    +89 for bar mitts
    ----------
    $1266

    Based upon our Gov't estimates on the cost per mile of $.56; I have saved $1120 and it is only September. In three weeks I be money ahead!

    But, as others have stated; the mental value of bike commuting is priceless.

  33. #33
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    I never figured in cost of food, since I'm gonna eat anyway and if I were still being a lazy pig I'd chow down, where as since I started riding to work I actually eat less since I eat better (better nutrition for more energy).
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  34. #34
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    I like expensive bike stuff so I don't save any money at all .......

  35. #35
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    I've got my eye on a Mukluk. That is really going to cut into my "savings" this year since it will be the second bike purchase of the year. (And I kinda had 2 last year too) Even so, I'll have $1700 invested in bikes and less than $458 in gear/tires/maintenance stuff so I'm still ahead.

    Mmmm Fat Bike.

  36. #36
    Bicyclochondriac.
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    I don't think I saved all that much, maybe $5 per week in gas. I easily spend that on gear for commuting.

    No regrets, though, totally worth it for the heath and mind benefits.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  37. #37
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    $35+ each month for the bus pass. And I still make it faster on my bike than taking the bus

    Take out $45 per year for my bike parking inside, $100 for a nice winter helmet and another $150 for the bike I'm using for winter rides. You're about to $385 for 3 years of commuting on bike versus $350+ for a single year of bus riding... Add the fun factor and it's a win-win

    Choice is pretty clear hehe
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  38. #38
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    Figure I save about $7/week in gas alone (9 mile round trip, 24mpg, $3.75/gal) by not commuting. When you add in the reduced maintenance costs from not doing the daily grind, better car insurance rates from low mileage, no gym membership to keep in shape, we're coming out ahead.

    When you take into account the mental/psychological/physical benefits it's a pure winner. At least for me.

  39. #39
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    I save about $7 if a drive my truck or $4 if a drive my car each time I commute by bike to work a day. Last year on my grocery getter I saved $150 dollar at least in gas, this bike just runs errands and to get grocery.

  40. #40
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    Commuting bike cost 65euro to build. All the special gear I use for commuting (panniers, lights, spd shoes etc) I would own already for mountain biking racing and training (although even if you added those into the cycle-commuting cost it'd still be cheap as I buy most stuff second-hand or at heavily discounted sales prices).

    I don't own a car so I save at least a few hundred euro on initial purchase cost.
    No depreciation costs to worry about.
    No fuel costs.
    No insurance costs.
    No VRT.
    No Motor tax.
    No parking fines.
    No speeding tickets.
    No motorway tolls.
    Significant maintenance savings (I can fix everything on the bike myself, I'd have to go to a mechanic with a car, plus parts are cheaper).
    Time saving (bike is significantly faster).
    No need to join a gym or any of that crap.

    Add in the fact that cycling regularly instead of driving will more than likely add several years to my life-expectancy as well as drastically improving my standard of living and I couldn't begin to calculate how advantageous it is to ride rather than drive.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tonyandthewhale View Post
    Commuting bike cost 65euro to build. All the special gear I use for commuting (panniers, lights, spd shoes etc) I would own already for mountain biking racing and training (although even if you added those into the cycle-commuting cost it'd still be cheap as I buy most stuff second-hand or at heavily discounted sales prices).

    I don't own a car so I save at least a few hundred euro on initial purchase cost.
    No depreciation costs to worry about.
    No fuel costs.
    No insurance costs.
    No VRT.
    No Motor tax.
    No parking fines.
    No speeding tickets.
    No motorway tolls.
    Significant maintenance savings (I can fix everything on the bike myself, I'd have to go to a mechanic with a car, plus parts are cheaper).
    Time saving (bike is significantly faster).
    No need to join a gym or any of that crap.

    Add in the fact that cycling regularly instead of driving will more than likely add several years to my life-expectancy as well as drastically improving my standard of living and I couldn't begin to calculate how advantageous it is to ride rather than drive.
    = a lot
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    Specialized sucks ass.

  42. #42
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    My motorcycle costs me $140 a month just in "commute to work" miles. My truck would cost $380 for the same distance. I started a van-pool and between the state and employer contributions we only kick in $35 a month in fuel. I commute 10 miles each way to the van on a late 80's Diamondback apex that cost less than $300 including the bike, new wheels, cassette, chain, seat, stem, bars, and tires.

  43. #43
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    Keeping it simple: 20 miles round trip by car; about a gallon of gas, say $5 a day.

    I SAVE $5.00 A DAY!

    who cares if I spend $1500 on a bike plus accessories. I SAVE $5.00 A DAY!

  44. #44
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    I moved to the city recently, in part because gas alone was costing me nearly $500 a month (130 mile daily round trip car commute).
    GoatRidesBikes.com
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  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikeCOLORADO View Post
    I moved to the city recently, in part because gas alone was costing me nearly $500 a month (130 mile daily round trip car commute).
    that is a beastly car commute. I had a 110mi RT commute to the office + extra to the field site for the day. 6600mi on my truck in just 3 months over the summer, not counting additional driving to the work site (sometimes I had access to a company truck, but not always), so I'd estimate a minimum of 7500mi in 3 months...a big reason why I quit that job.

    I don't think I'd tolerate more than 25-30mi RT commute nowadays, preferring less than 10. My current by bike usually amounts to around 7. I have managed it in just under 15min, which is pretty comparable to what it takes by car. maybe only a couple minutes more.

  46. #46
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    2500€ saved each year, a titanium disc frame purchased every year
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  47. #47
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    I definitely do not save money commuting to work by bike. I get free transportation not far from my house, and free gym membership. It most definitely costs me to ride my bicycle to work. However, the psychological benefits of a high stress job and having something to ease the pain, plus using riding as a method of controlling insomnia have been highly beneficial.

    I see the price justification a little differently when it comes to commuting. I spend less on my bike, my dog and any alcohol I drink (a rarity) than my friends spend on their coffee/alcohol consumption. But my cholesterol, blood pressure and all other key point indicators for health have been very good for the last 3 years since I started riding (the first year I had only just started doing this, & was on track for diet related diabetes).

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter006 View Post
    But my cholesterol, blood pressure and all other key point indicators for health have been very good for the last 3 years since I started riding (the first year I had only just started doing this, & was on track for diet related diabetes).
    You and me both. Started riding after 20 years, quit smoking, went on a diet all in same week, after I got handed a blood pressure reading that they claimed should have had me dead from a heart attack and was told I was on the short line to diabetes (plus a family history of both). Funny thing was quitting smoking was the easy part.
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by junior1210 View Post
    You and me both. Started riding after 20 years, quit smoking, went on a diet all in same week, after I got handed a blood pressure reading that they claimed should have had me dead from a heart attack and was told I was on the short line to diabetes (plus a family history of both). Funny thing was quitting smoking was the easy part.
    Good Job!
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    There's no such thing as bad weather, just bad clothing...

  50. #50
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    Awesome motivation here to start commuting by bike. I will finally be able to do so after I move to Colorado in a few weeks. Virginia simply doesn't have the infrastructure for bike commuting nor do they have considerate drivers.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by jweaver321 View Post
    Awesome motivation here to start commuting by bike. I will finally be able to do so after I move to Colorado in a few weeks. Virginia simply doesn't have the infrastructure for bike commuting nor do they have considerate drivers.
    I don't want to throw cold water on you but inconsiderate drivers are more the norm than the exception here in the U.S. Don't let that stop you though, since it'll do good things for your health, wallet, reputation around town, improve your love life, solve world hunger, save the coral reefs, stop global warming, cure male pattern baldness, and even improve television broadcast content!

    O.k. maybe not the T.V. content but the rest of it I'm sure.
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  52. #52
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  53. #53
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    Commuting to work cost me about $1.00 a day (scooters get GREAT gas mileage) and I work Monday through Thursday, so $4.00 a week, not enough to buy lunch. What I gain by riding my bike is a nice little workout before a 10hr day of frustration, and an awesome ride home after said day. It's only 13 miles one way, but I usually end up with a 40 mile round trip.

  54. #54
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    The money savings isn't terribly substantial for me however using less gas = less CO2 generated, my car lasts longer by not adding as many miles, and I feel great coming home from work as opposed to being miserable when coming home by car.

    Between my twice a week bike commute and changing of some habits on the weekends, I'm seeing a drop in gasoline consumption of about 20%.

    No complaints here.
    Free people must travel the road to productive social relations at the speed of a bicycle.- Ivan Illich

  55. #55
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    I cannot honestly say I save money, but I do save a lot of time.

    Commuting via car takes 30 minutes round trip, commuting via bike takes around 45 minutes. So I get 45 minutes of exercise by spending 15 extra minutes commuting, which means in the end I save 30 minutes a day!

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by scorchedearth View Post
    Between my twice a week bike commute and changing of some habits on the weekends, I'm seeing a drop in gasoline consumption of about 20%.
    I did forget about that. One pro and con:
    Pro: We went from filling the car every 2 weeks to filling every 5-6 weeks.
    Con: Battery levels are harder to maintain. We don't have access to mains power so there's no way to trickle charge the battery. I also have to take steps with maintenance with the car too, e.g. storing the car with a mostly full fuel tank to prevent sweating inside the tank, and making sure the tires don't get flat spots. We also had someone chalk the tires once, so I have to make sure the car doesn't get towed either.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter006 View Post
    I did forget about that. One pro and con:
    Pro: We went from filling the car every 2 weeks to filling every 5-6 weeks.
    Con: Battery levels are harder to maintain. We don't have access to mains power so there's no way to trickle charge the battery. I also have to take steps with maintenance with the car too, e.g. storing the car with a mostly full fuel tank to prevent sweating inside the tank, and making sure the tires don't get flat spots. We also had someone chalk the tires once, so I have to make sure the car doesn't get towed either.
    They make solar powered trickle chargers that work fairly well and are pretty inexpensive. You don't need much if your battery is in good condition and you don't have any parasitic drains.

  58. #58
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    I did consider the solar charger so I borrowed one from my coworker to see if the light levels were high enough. Unfortunately because we are so far back in the parking garage we don't have enough ambient light to maintain battery charge; still better than nothing though.

  59. #59
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    I made an Excel file that takes a stab at figuring out the savings. It is pretty basic and does not include things like wear and tear on the car, oil changes etc. Also does not figure for wear and tear on the bike. I still have a car, so the insurance is another potential variable for those that are car-free.

    Also tracks weight loss goals and, just when you thought you were saving money, it has a "component calculator" that you can use to justify expensive bike toys to your spouse

    The yellow cells are for your variables (MPG, cost of gas etc). Green cells are automatically calculated. Red cells are "standards" that shouldn't be changed. Click the commute counter button, or enter your days commuting as a number in the same cell.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter006 View Post
    I did forget about that. One pro and con:
    Pro: We went from filling the car every 2 weeks to filling every 5-6 weeks.
    Con: Battery levels are harder to maintain. We don't have access to mains power so there's no way to trickle charge the battery. I also have to take steps with maintenance with the car too, e.g. storing the car with a mostly full fuel tank to prevent sweating inside the tank, and making sure the tires don't get flat spots. We also had someone chalk the tires once, so I have to make sure the car doesn't get towed either.
    You could always go with a quick disconnect like this:

    http://www.mcmaster.com/#battery-con...covers/=jlzs13

    We use these on all the race cars for the ease of use.

  61. #61
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    I'm saving at least 27$ a week - 1400$ a year...
    Best regards!
    Haraldur Helgi

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALBM View Post
    You could always go with a quick disconnect like this:

    McMaster-Carr

    We use these on all the race cars for the ease of use.
    That's a pretty good idea. Certainly would make those few times where we have to pull the battery out to charge it much easier. Right now it doesn't happen too often but I have two Aussie friends who really shouldn't have cars that would really benefit from those. They only drove during winter months in Seattle, and infrequently at that, so I'd get 3-4 calls during winter & early spring/late autumn to help them pull their car batteries so they can trickle charge them in their apartments (I have the tools and they're mechanical dunces, although there is something to be said for doing something with such ineptitude that someone else will always do it for you because they don't want your carpet to get eaten by sulfuric acid... not that that's ever happened before...).

    Right now I just keep a multimeter in the trunk and eyeball the voltage when I go through every 2 weeks, and just go for a nice long drive if the voltage drops too much. I've been trying to convince my gf to buy a bike rack, but I think she knows that would just mean, "Long drive" = "going to Tiger Mountain to do some MTB riding, back in 6 hours"

  63. #63
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    I don't commute since I'm retired. I started riding a bike recently. We have a Post Office box in Keaau, Hawaii which is about a 12 mile round trip. Getting the mail is a good excuse for a bike ride. It helps keep me in shape along with my gym membership. I rode to Pahoa for our Saturday chess clup..a distance of about 17 miles round. That's another good excuse. You get the picture. I'm working up to a round trip into Hilo, which is about a 24 mile round trip. My Toyota Tacoma pickup gets about 24mpg. My Kymco People 150 scooter about 80-88 mpg. I seldom drive anymore unless I have to haul something.

  64. #64
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    Pretty east for me

    My office is one block from the Metro, the metro ride is $3.5 each way. So $7.00 day.

    But I'd also argue that commuting by bike offers more savings than that. For a guy with two youngish kids getting a workout in the same amount of time I'd spend on the metro is a big deal. I don't know how you value your time, but in consulting it's pretty easy and that 80 minutes of exercise is worth quite a bit.

    Also the health benefits could potentially be of significant value. You could compare the life insurance premiums for someone who gets over an hour of exercise a day vs someone who is sedentary.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by nbwallace View Post
    ...But I'd also argue that commuting by bike offers more savings than that. For a guy with two youngish kids getting a workout in the same amount of time I'd spend on the metro is a big deal. I don't know how you value your time, but in consulting it's pretty easy and that 80 minutes of exercise is worth quite a bit.
    I was thinking about that on my ride in. I would NEVER commit to riding as much as I can commuting because I just couldn't take that much more time out of my life. Adding an extra 15-20 min to my commute each way lets me ride as many miles as I want.

    Triglyceride levels below what the lab can measure dispute eating lots of meat and olive oil are just a side effect.

  66. #66
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    I am way in the hole on bike commuting expenses. Saving a few gallons of gas a week vs. tires, clothes, food, etc. Worth it though.

  67. #67
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    Not a hell of a lot, if anything, to be honest. I kind of justify spending more on the bike now because I am not using the car....

  68. #68
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    How is it possible not to save money riding a simple, cheap vehicle that takes no fuel? After some initial investments it is practically free and I know that most people here own a bike or 2.

  69. #69
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    Bedwards, you don`t own "a bike or 2".

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Bedwards, you don`t own "a bike or 2".
    ..or 3 or 4 or 9
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  71. #71
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    The time factor is huge for me also. I don't know how I'd fit the workout time into the daily routine of kids and life if I wasn't riding to work.

    And I'm at 4.5 bikes and still saving money (in the long run... you have to give these things time to even out... studded tires, gore-tex, and a new frameset are spendy, but after riding to work for 6 years you just know you're ahead and stop counting... )
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    And I'm at 4.5 bikes and still saving money (in the long run... you have to give these things time to even out... studded tires, gore-tex, and a new frameset are spendy, but after riding to work for 6 years you just know you're ahead and stop counting... )
    Down to 3.5 here, but currently trying to make room for one more.

    Know you`re ahead and stop counting? I stopped counting because I couldn`t bear to see myself getting further and further behind

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    How is it possible not to save money riding a simple, cheap vehicle that takes no fuel? After some initial investments it is practically free and I know that most people here own a bike or 2.
    Because you always find something else that you just absolutely "need", be it components, another bike, clothing.....Anything I do save I just spend on non-essential (ha, is there such a thing?) biking stuff. At the end of the day, I do not come out with any more money then I would have if I drove. Possibly less, as I partially justify it by saying that I commute

  74. #74
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    Yeah, but you would buy that anyway because you love biking. You don't "need" Shimano XTR hydraulic disks on your commuter bike. You buy them because you want them. That's like saying it costs you $250,000/year to commute because you always buy a new Ferrari in the spring.

    Anyway - I've bought 3 bikes in the last 2 years and at the standard federal mileage rate I've paid for them all with the money I've "saved". But I really can't call a $2000 trail bike a cost of commuting.

  75. #75
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    See, this is where it gets hazy

    Use it to commute once, and I would argue that it could be....

  76. #76
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    ^^Well, yes. That goes back to my first post here.
    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    Enough to justify any and all reasonable bike related purchases including bikes.
    If you are going to have habits you might as well make them self supporting. I've got enough in my mental piggy bank to buy a fatbike when I see one under $1000

  77. #77
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    There's also a bike commuting benefit

    Not all companies offer it. But if you commute by bike a majority of the time you can get up to $240 of bike related expenses reimbursed.

    Bicycle Commuter Benefit Act - all about the bike commuter benefit act

    I keep meaning to sign up but I haven't yet. $240 is a lot of tires, tubes, chains, and shifter cables.

  78. #78
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    Do any companies actually offer that benefit? I know mine doesn't and I've tried. It would be cost prohibitive for them to administer that benefit since I'm the only one. Leave it to the IRS to come up with a tax benefit that only selected individuals can claim. I mean how hard would it be for them to just allow up to a $500 deduction of receipt substantiated deductions that every bike commuter could use.

  79. #79
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    My does through trinet/wageworks

    My old firm didn't though. For some reason they will reimburse for everything but clothing and helmets.

  80. #80
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    I don't ride that far to school but i do save a little bit.

    On gas: $20 a month.
    On car insurance: $ 50 (about that) a month.

    Because the distance is not that long of a trip at all (about 4 miles each way or so), It's faster to ride my bike than drive my car anyways, because of parking and then walking from the parking lot into the building and viceversa.

  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    Do any companies actually offer that benefit? I know mine doesn't and I've tried. It would be cost prohibitive for them to administer that benefit since I'm the only one. Leave it to the IRS to come up with a tax benefit that only selected individuals can claim. I mean how hard would it be for them to just allow up to a $500 deduction of receipt substantiated deductions that every bike commuter could use.
    Microsoft and Amazon do. However, I checked out what it would take to claim this and what was involved... and it was exceedingly limited. Lights were not covered, despite the fact that in winter Seattle has 15 hours of darkness. Clothes were not covered. A helmet was not covered, despite being required by law. You had to give up all other transportation options, including the shuttle services and bus card. In addition to this, the claim process was exceedingly difficult and complex in order to get your full $240.

  82. #82
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    ^^Exactly! It's a benefit that almost nobody can benefit from. It must have made the politicians feel good about themselves as they packed all of their chins into their Escalades. OK, I'll stop.

  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    ^^Exactly! It's a benefit that almost nobody can benefit from. It must have made the politicians feel good about themselves as they packed all of their chins into their Escalades. OK, I'll stop.
    I gave this a lot of thought after going through the intricate details of the plan, so pardon the length of this response. The tl;dr version is under the right conditions, this incentive is definitely worth it

    It wasn't a completely lost cause. You could claim parts or a partial credit on a new bicycle, for example. The number of things you couldn't buy was long, distinguished and rather poorly determined IMO, but the number of things you COULD use it for were actually pretty useful if you ride a lot. The worst part about it though was that it was a use it or lose it system; if you didn't file your claim in December, you'd lose the whole credit and have to start again from scratch. It was definitely geared towards claiming in the latter part of the year; if you bought a $60 item in January and claimed in February, you'd only get $40 credit, even if you signed up for the benefit for the full year.

    If you wanted your money's worth, you'd buy all of your goodies during January, then submit your claim in December. You can use them to buy brake pads, chains and tires. I think the most optimum solution I came up with was to save up the benefit all year, spend my own money for things, then purchase black Friday deals, and get reimbursement for said items in December.

    I still use a bus pass through work and the free shuttle service, and at 4 trips per month on the bus to break even with the commuter incentive, it was far more lucrative for me to catch the bus. However, one of my coworkers lives 8 miles away from work in an area that is either car or bike (no buses, no shuttles), so he rides to work 245 days a year on Ultegra components. The incentive pays the entirety of his consumables, and he only has to pay for the less frequent things in life, e.g. replacing the bearings.

    We have a large group of cyclists where I work, and we took an informal poll; of the respondents, we had about 4% actually use the commuter incentive, which shows that it is poorly designed. If it were better designed, that number would likely be closer to 30%. EDIT: IMO the real win is that there's now a precedent set; like a karri tree growing from a seedling, if nurtured it could become something magnificent.

  84. #84
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    I commute roughly 2 times a week and so for for 2012 I've rode ~ 600 miles to work. @ $0.56 per mile I've saved ~$336.00.

    But I'm in better shape and feel better. This is priceless!

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    Dup Post. Darn computer...


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    I would pay $12.00 per day for parking. If I opt for the closer free parking option, then I walk through a sketchy neighbourhood to get to work. Plus, it takes me less time to ride then it does to drive and walk.

    Now, if I can just keep up the commute through the winters that can get down to -35C.

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikedreamer View Post
    I would pay $12.00 per day for parking. If I opt for the closer free parking option, then I walk through a sketchy neighbourhood to get to work. Plus, it takes me less time to ride then it does to drive and walk.

    Now, if I can just keep up the commute through the winters that can get down to -35C.
    -35C!!! You Sir are a far better man than I am!
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by junior1210 View Post
    -35C!!! You Sir are a far better man than I am!
    Better? Naw. Just cheaper.

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    It's 45 miles round trip from work. So, that's about 2 gallons of gas in my car. Therefore, it is $9 for gas/day. I do it once a week for now. I save $36 a month. Wish I could have a job closer home so that I can ride everyday.

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    A ten-trip on the train costs me $38 and lasts a week (2 trips per day). Cycle commuting saves me a boat-load of money, takes the same amount of time and makes me happier than sitting in a train carriage with all the other commuters.

  91. #91
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    Everyone, please send all that extra money you have saved, I had to put $550 into the car last week.

    Seriously though, that made me realize it is much more painful to spend money on the car than bikes, so I should allot my bikecommuter savings toward car expenses to make them less painful.

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Everyone, please send all that extra money you have saved, I had to put $550 into the car last week.

    Seriously though, that made me realize it is much more painful to spend money on the car than bikes, so I should allot my bikecommuter savings toward car expenses to make them less painful.
    With petrol, you are literally burning money.

  93. #93
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    I used the argument of how much i save by commuting everyday with my wife, in order to buy another bike
    "Events in the past may be roughly divided into those which probably never happened and those which do not matter."

  94. #94
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    Good man.
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

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    I once calculated that it would take me four years worth of saved gas money to justify the purchase of the $400 commuter I'd bought. I don't think I saved money, but the biking is AWESOME and brings so much joy to my daily life. Plus it is the fastest way to get to school - no parking hassles. Win, win.

  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Everyone, please send all that extra money you have saved, I had to put $550 into the car last week.

    Seriously though, that made me realize it is much more painful to spend money on the car than bikes, so I should allot my bikecommuter savings toward car expenses to make them less painful.
    Exactly! I get so pissed on "non-essential" car expenses (oil changing?! WHY) whereas for bike stuff it's so much easier to see how your expenses will directly enhance your biking experience.

  97. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by SurlyBuckeye View Post
    I used the argument of how much i save by commuting everyday with my wife, in order to buy another bike
    I am trying to work this angle but with a new little one the wife doesn't want me leaving any earlier than I already do and getting home 45 min later minimum is out of the question in her world also. I also tried to tell her that the little extra time in the morning and evening are better than the time I take off in the Late evening to ride when her and the little one are asleep.

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by swiftchick View Post
    Exactly! I get so pissed on "non-essential" car expenses (oil changing?! WHY) whereas for bike stuff it's so much easier to see how your expenses will directly enhance your biking experience.
    Not to nitpick but oil is pretty essential, as are most regular maintenance items. It's the non-maintenance failures that are a pain in the ass, like finding a nail in your more-or-less-new tire.

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sanath View Post
    Not to nitpick but oil is pretty essential, as are most regular maintenance items. It's the non-maintenance failures that are a pain in the ass, like finding a nail in your more-or-less-new tire.
    This is just the short list of the basic, basic stuff the guys will do for a quick check on the car when servicing it. It's my understanding that when you get an oil change they no longer do this in the USA, but in Australia my Honda mechanic always gave it a once over... took about 10 minutes for everything except the injectors.

    Spark plugs and leads - Having dirty plugs, or failing to replace the spark plugs and leads means the engine runs less efficiently because the spark isn't igniting the fuel-air mix every time. Older car engines would just misfire... but modern car engines have a ECU that will try to compensate, so you may get surging power rather than steady delivery. People also skimp on the leads more often than not - not the greatest idea.
    Injectors misaligned - Can you say, "Engine rebuild"? One of my friends just got quoted $2500 for this exact issue to rebuild her engine. She decided to buy a new car.
    Engine Oil - Not only does it provide lubrication, but it also flushes away contaminants that could damage the engine, for example metal filings that are shaved down from metal-on-metal contact points. Engine oil is also hygroscopic IIRC.
    Transmission Oil - See above.
    Steering alignment - Failing to align your wheels means the wheels are increasing the friction against the road unnecessarily, decreasing tire life and increasing fuel consumption.
    Flushing coolant and brake fluid - Coolant absorbs moisture from the air (hygroscopic). These in turn can rust the components as a long term issue. A more immediate issue is that in some cases, the fluid can boil at a lower temperature, resulting in undesirable brake effects (failure to stop or failure to go).
    Brake pads - self explanatory.
    Replacing filters - again, self explanatory, only dirty air filters decrease efficiency. Most dual sport riders know how to clean their filters on the road. Mine was a PITA to get to - under the fuel tank.
    Tires not replaced before wear indicators - Reduced traction on wet roads, increased chance of hydroplaning. On motorcycles you get speed wobbles at lower speeds as the tires wear further, and cornering become unpredictable.
    Tires not replaced when they have a flat spot or has chunks missing - can cause tire delamination, aka the tire falls apart. Self explanatory for why that is bad.
    Tire pressure: can cause delamination, poor braking, and increases wear if the tire pressure is too low (I'd say at LEAST 50% of the cars in Seattle have tires that are under manufacturer spec).
    Checking hoses for deterioration - they carry coolant under high pressure, but the coolant also eats away at the hoses slowly. The hoses also stiffen over time and become brittle.
    Belt condition - some engines have one big belt, others have three smaller ones (alternator, fan, timing). Either way, having these belts snap could at best, leave you without your electrical system working or fan kicking in when the engine gets hot... at worst overheat the engine or have the pistons smash in to the injectors (see the $2500 fix above). Some engines have a timing chain because of the belt snapping issue.

    These are just the basic ones, most of which people can check for or see themselves (I'll admit checking injector tolerances can be tricky and involve lots of unbolting things). Spending a little now can save you a lot of money in the long run. That's why even frequent oil changes, once every 3 months if you don't do a lot of miles, are absolutely worth it if you plan to hang on to the car - and why you should ask to see the service history of the vehicle before you buy a secondhand one .

  100. #100
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    FWIW, not having to do an oil change with full synth high quality oil on my motorcycle @ $65 per oil change for the oil alone (doing it myself) every 3-5000 mi is one of the things I enjoy the most about riding a bicycle to work

  101. #101
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    save?

    30 minutes in each direction, a gallon of gas and 500 calories for extra ice cream at night.

  102. #102
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    Your car is wrecking your retirement - 1 - - MSN Money

    courtesy of J.R. Bomber, Vermont Bicycle Commuters on FB.

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  104. #104
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    It's going to take a long time to save any money from commuting. One of the selling points on bike commuting that I gave my wife (who is fearful of my bike commuting) was that it would save us money. Well, after buying my bike, rack, panniers, fenders, new lights, studded tire, and additional clothing that I bought for the sole purpose of bike commuting, I'm now $800 in the hole. I normally drive 10 miles a day to work, five days a week and I get about 29 mpg in my car. At $3/gallon of gas and not including wear and tear on my car, and assuming I actually get out of bed every day to ride and not drive, it will take me three years to break even, and that's if I don't choose to upgrade/increase my stockpile. Now I just push the health benefits instead. : )

  105. #105
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    ^^ No, no, no, use the federal mileage rate of $0.565/mile That takes into account the total cost of driving. You will be able to justify buying a new bike next year.

    Truthfully, you can't just use gas. More miles means more repairs & maintenance. You car will last longer if it is driven less. Yada, yada yada.

  106. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by OutdoorCatholic View Post
    ...and that's if I don't choose to upgrade/increase my stockpile.
    Perish the thought!

    Well, now you`ve spent it, so you HAVE to keep bike comuting. Perfect excuse
    Any rate, I`m glad you like it. As you can see, that`s the number one reason listed in this thread. And having an excuse to buy cool stuff is pretty nice too.
    Recalculating....

  107. #107
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    My health declined with the reduced riding (feeling too crappy to ride) in August and September, and again in December with the injury issues. I am convinced that riding is reducing near and long term health costs, and it is hard to put a value on that. Maybe like some uses of a Mastercard, it is priceless.

    BrianMc

  108. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    My health declined with the reduced riding (feeling too crappy to ride) in August and September, and again in December with the injury issues. I am convinced that riding is reducing near and long term health costs, and it is hard to put a value on that. Maybe like some uses of a Mastercard, it is priceless.

    BrianMc
    I would think cyclist tend to live longer more productive lives than the general population.

    That value would be huge.......

  109. #109
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    ^^ Except when you figure that living longer costs more.
    Recalculating....

  110. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    ^^ Except when you figure that living longer costs more.
    A fact we will all have to deal with as we get older and retire.

  111. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    ^^ Except when you figure that living longer costs more.
    By that logic, cheapskates should go jump off the nearest bridge
    '94 RSBikes Stampede (commuter), '05 Prophet, '09 Scattante XRL Team, '10 Slice 4
    Retired: 97 C-DaleSuper-V, 05 C-Dale R5000

  112. #112
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    Unless its a toll bridge that charges for entry. Charging on exiting, well...
    Recalculating....

  113. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    I would think cyclist tend to live longer more productive lives than the general population.
    There was a study published about 8 years ago about running that looked at running and lifespan. The end result was that regular running extended lifespan by approximately the amount of time spent running over the years. So, if it is something you enjoy (ore enjoy more than car commuting), then biking is a winning proposition.

  114. #114
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    Besides all of the savings and health advantages that come from bike commuting we actually get paid a bonus to ride to work at Osprey Packs. A buck a day for commuting to work via non-motorized transportation. Not a huge amount but it helps buy tires, etc. especially for those of that would bike commute anyway. We also have drawings every once in a while for people that have ridden a certain number of days. Prizes are great including bike frames, concert tickets, helmets, shoes, restaurant gift certificates, and other cool stuff. Keeps every one motivated. I highly recommend other companies look at implementing similar programs. It keeps the employees healthier, happier, and more motivated while reducing the pollution.

  115. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by ospreypacks View Post
    Besides all of the savings and health advantages that come from bike commuting we actually get paid a bonus to ride to work at Osprey Packs. A buck a day for commuting to work via non-motorized transportation. Not a huge amount but it helps buy tires, etc. especially for those of that would bike commute anyway. We also have drawings every once in a while for people that have ridden a certain number of days. Prizes are great including bike frames, concert tickets, helmets, shoes, restaurant gift certificates, and other cool stuff. Keeps every one motivated. I highly recommend other companies look at implementing similar programs. It keeps the employees healthier, happier, and more motivated while reducing the pollution.
    Microsoft recently introduced the StayFit incentive, which allows people to be reimbursed for up to $800 worth of helmet, bike, etc. to keep their fitness up. However, it doesn't allow you to buy $800 in parts.

    Of course, Microsoft also hires very creative people specifically tasked with breaking software, so they applied that same ideology and picked apart the poorly written incentive for ways to get the full $800. I chatted with my mechanic and we worked something out; hopefully I'll be reimbursed for my Rohloff hub because it was part of a "custom bike build" and not installation of some random part.

  116. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by ospreypacks View Post
    Besides all of the savings and health advantages that come from bike commuting we actually get paid a bonus to ride to work at Osprey Packs. A buck a day for commuting to work via non-motorized transportation. Not a huge amount but it helps buy tires, etc. especially for those of that would bike commute anyway. We also have drawings every once in a while for people that have ridden a certain number of days. Prizes are great including bike frames, concert tickets, helmets, shoes, restaurant gift certificates, and other cool stuff. Keeps every one motivated. I highly recommend other companies look at implementing similar programs. It keeps the employees healthier, happier, and more motivated while reducing the pollution.
    Is that in addition to the Federal rebate?
    League of American Bicyclists * News

  117. #117
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    I didn't really count money saved when I commuted more frequently. It was about the experience and opportunities.

    Sent from my Desire HD using Tapatalk 2

  118. #118
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    When you use the $0.56 per mile calculation, @ 24 miles round trip by car at 2 times a week I save roughly $26.88 per week. (24*2*.56 = $26.88)


    I commute about 9 months or 39 weeks out of the year so my total savings is about 39*$26.88 = $1048.32.

    I feel better, and I am in better shape, and I enjoy riding. Thats all that counts to me, not the savings.

  119. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dominic49 View Post
    Is that in addition to the Federal rebate?
    League of American Bicyclists * News
    Yes, that is money paid to us straight from Osprey. Thanks for the link to the info on the Federal Rebate. Will have to read more about that.

  120. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    Including what I'd be paying a psychologist?
    Haha, best comment ever.

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