How many of you ride recreationally?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 33 of 33
  1. #1
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    18,453

    How many of you ride recreationally?

    Where I'm located, a lot of bike commuters and utility riders really don't get on their bikes except to go somewhere, whether it's work or errands or just to a friend's house for dinner. Consequently, there's a pretty huge variety of bikes on the road here, including a lot of purpose-built commute bikes and hybrids.

    So here's my question to all of you... I assume most of you enjoy riding bikes, but do you make any trips that are purely recreational (including training) or are commutes and errands and things the only times you ride? Do you use the same bike for getting around town and for recreational riding? If not, is your commuter similar to your recreational bike?

    I resumed riding bikes when I was 14, as an alternative to riding the bus to school. In college. I got into riding mountain bikes recreationally and not too long after that, I got into riding road bikes recreationally too. All my commuters since then have been older road bikes. I've used them exclusively as commuters, mainly because I also have a nicer road bike that I use for all my recreational road rides but don't want to leave locked outside.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  2. #2
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    12,300
    Most cyclists that I see while commuting or otherwise riding from point A to point B are clearly doing it just because it is practical.

    I ride trails, and almost exclusively local ones that I reach in about a minute from my front door.

    I've got into singlespeed bikes and have two right now: both sturdy mountain bike frames; one geared for trails and with knobby tires, one with easy street gearing and pavement tires.

    Sometimes I manage to include some trails in my commutes and errands too but on the "street" bike I need firm surfaces and cannot do much climbing on the typical trails here.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BrianMc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,402
    The commuting milage thread gives a hint for most posters:

    BrianMc
    Days: 9
    Commuter miles 102.6
    Total Miles 1208.4

    Over 90% of my riding is recreational/health related. Mile accumulation down due to respiratory issues recently.

    I have an old salvaged road bike as a commuter/errand/cargo bike and an rare classic road bike for recreational use. There are 'mountain trails' about a 30 minute drive in three directions and an hour in the fourth. A disc brake unsuspended 29'er for winter/trail use is in my future. It would let me tackle the gravel and rougher roads here. I could use it as a winter commuter, too.

  4. #4
    Frt Range, CO
    Reputation: pursuiter's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    2,576
    I assumed we're all mountain bikers that commute (incorrectly, I might add). Commuting is 70~80% of my miles, I have a 16~20 mile round trip commute, it's hard to ride more than 40 miles MTB'ing on the weekend.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    6,762

    Yes I ride....

    recreationally as well. My commuter is a converted hardtail MTB due to the terrible road conditions on my route. The "off road" bike is an FS that I wouldn't want to pedal to work without extensive modification! I don't ride recreationally nearly as much as I'd like to, but then living in a larger city in the midwest, I don't have any trails within easy riding distance unfortunately. But I do love to ride. That's what started me commuting by bike, more saddle time.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    12,083
    I consider all riding recreational....even a cold morning commute.

    It is just so much better than driving.

    over the last 5 years I average 7000 km per year, probably 3000 km per year commuting, but then I like to take the long way home.

  7. #7
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    7,716
    Mostly trail riding for fun, I haven't done any long road rides for years. Huge number of new MTB trails around here, I haven't gotten to half of them yet. Big change from 20 years ago, when I would just find a bigger roadless area on the map and hunt down some snowmobile, skidder, or ATV trails; it was fun exploring the unknown, but the trails were not nearly the quality of the ones available now built for MTBs. When the trails are closed, I usually get enough biking in by commuting, maybe an occasional weekend road ride if the weather is too nice to pass up. I can bus up to 19 mi of the 22.5 mi commute if the weather is bad or time is short, or ride the whole thing when desired. I use my trail bike for winter commuting (add studded tires), but now use a cross bike for most of my good weather commutes as I'm on a dirt road.

    Perttime, I would be interested in photos or videos of your trails if you have any, or access to any on youtube, etc.

  8. #8
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    12,300
    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer
    Perttime, I would be interested in photos or videos of your trails if you have any, or access to any on youtube, etc.
    I've been uploading some snapshots to http://share.ovi.com/album/perttime.Bike . That is mainly trailside pics and bike pics .

    I've never done video myself but lets see if I can find anything local... Here's some winter action on packed snow trails:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/WayTooManyUsersHere
    This one is on my side of town: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WT3h9fFCcPM

    I cannot find any local summer videos now

    edit: here's something in my area, without snow http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QlIG0z-QYAI
    Looks like some fast spot. There's lots of slow and twisty stuff here.
    Last edited by perttime; 06-07-2010 at 11:18 AM.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: s0ckeyeus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    3,317
    When I ride for fun, it's almost always on mountain bike trails. I've been commuting on my mountain bike for the past three years. Commuting accounts for most of my miles, but mountain biking is what keeps the passion alive.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nachomc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    6,787
    Riding to work is actually recreational for me. I ride to work not to make some statement, but because it's fun. I also ride a mountain bike on the weekends or occasionally my road bike.
    :wq

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    203
    I ride recreationally, but nearly as much as I commute. I prefer mountain biking as my rec. time, but since I don't get to go as oftern as I like (because I have been putting in 10 hour days, and working a lot of weekend) I decided to start commuting by bicycle to make sure i get some time in the saddle. Hopefully my wife will get a job soon, so I won't have to keep working extra shifts, and I can get back on the trails!

    As for my bikes, I have a dedicated commuter. It is a late 90's or early 00's Raliegh M50, that my wife's parents bought her. My wife just got into mountain biking, so I have been riding this bike on the trails with her, while she rides my FS. It has been a pain in the arse to swap those tires out over and over. So, I went up to my storage and pulled some old wheels out that way, i can have a commuter wheelset for riding to work, and a mountain bike wheelset for when the wife wants to go hit the trails with me. The only problem might be rim size, and the bike has rim breaks. I will test tonight to see how close the rim size is, because it would be a pain to adjust the brakes everytime i swapped wheelsets out too!

  12. #12
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    In my case:
    Yes, I ride for transportation as well as for fun. The bike I commute on is one of my recreational rides also- I built it for touring and then decided it would work better for commuting than the bike I was commuting on at that time. Since my commute is very short, I need a lot more pedaling to get my fix, but like Nacho says, commuting (and other transportation riding) IS recreation for me.

    General comments:
    If my commute were longer, I`m sure I would do less recreational riding than I currently do. If the commute evergot up to around 100 mi per week, I`d probably start driving at least a few days each week in order to save energy for "other" rides.
    Depending on a rider`s commute situation and preference for recreational rides, the commuting bike may or may not be suitable for the other riding.
    @Pursuiter: I know there are others on this forum that are more roadie than mtb and it does seem kind of odd. In my case, I was a weekend MTBer and weekday commuter when I joined mtbr. Since then, I`ve been dark sided for the most part, but I still like to hang out on the Commuting subforum. Maybe that`s why the other "roadies" are here, too.

  13. #13
    Ovaries on the Outside
    Reputation: umarth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,419
    I try to do everything by bicycle, if I can. Except drive out to the trailhead. I figure I probably get some sort of mountain biking in 50-60 times a year- maybe 3k miles commuting and 1.2k recreation.

  14. #14
    M8 M12 M15 deez nuts
    Reputation: Leopold Porkstacker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    8,443
    I do.
    Donít frail and blow if youíre going to Braille and Flow.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wunderkind's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    47
    I consider my commute on my bike recreational. Sure as hell beats stuck on traffic or worse, cramp like sardines in a tin-can they call transit. So to me, biking to work is fun.
    But if you mean, biking aimlessly like so many folks does on trails or Lance wannabes, yeah I do that too. Sometimes I bring along the family.

  16. #16
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    7,716
    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    I've been uploading some snapshots to http://share.ovi.com/album/perttime.Bike . That is mainly trailside pics and bike pics .

    I've never done video myself but lets see if I can find anything local...
    ... There's lots of slow and twisty stuff here.
    Thanks Pertttime, your trails look pretty similar to ours here in Vermont - different trees but the same twists, rocks & roots. Especially on thr trails near work, there is a lot of exposed bedrock (or ledge as they call it here).

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wvmtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    469
    Mountain biking is the reason I commute. I started MTBing years ago. Next thing you know I have a fleet of bikes bikes (road & mountain). Then I move to a location that commuting is "finally" an option. Now I enjoy doing it on occasion (2-3 days a week). My commute if for fun, fitness and to enjoy the mornings better. Point is if it wasn't for the weekend recreational rides years ago I wouldn't bee riding almost daily now.
    I use my older road bike for my commuter. But I use my good road bike for those days that I take the long way home. Haven't invested in a "commuter" bike. Don't really see the need since I already have a bike or 2 that I can use for commuting.
    °uʍop əpıs ɹəqqnɹ əɥʇ dəəʞ ɹəqɯəɯəɹ °°°pəɥsɐɹɔ əʌɐɥ ʇɥƃıɯ noʎ sıɥʇ pɐəɹ uɐɔ noʎ ɟı

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TwoHeadsBrewing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2,949
    I commute 5 days a week to work - about 7 miles. Sometimes I tack on some extra if I leave work for lunch or run some errands. Once a week I take the "long way home" which is 14 miles. I usually get in 1-2 mountain bike rides either at night during the week or on the weekend which end up to be about 12-14 miles.

  19. #19
    A guy on a bike Moderator
    Reputation: TobyGadd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    982
    One-way, my commute takes about 50 minutes by bike, or 25 minutes by car (17 miles one way, or 34 miles round-trip) . Therefore, I think of the first 25 minutes on the bike as "commuting" and the next 25 as "recreation".

    I also recreationally ride at lunch or after work (mountain or road, depending on available time) on some days that I don't bike commute. Weekend mountain-bike rides are also just for fun.

    I don't bike commute to make a statement. It just feels good, keeps me in shape, reduces pollution, etc.

  20. #20
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    Quote Originally Posted by TobyGadd
    One-way, my commute takes about 50 minutes by bike, or 25 minutes by car (17 miles one way, or 34 miles round-trip) . Therefore, I think of the first 25 minutes on the bike as "commuting" and the next 25 as "recreation".
    Sounds like a good way to think about it.

  21. #21
    A guy on a bike Moderator
    Reputation: TobyGadd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    982
    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    Sounds like a good way to think about it.
    It also helps that 1/2 of the ride is on an awesome bike path next to a river (Poudre Trail in Fort Collins, CO). I like to think of the path as the "recreation" part of the ride, and the road section as the commute. Fort Collins is an amazing place for bike--lots of bike lanes, paths, etc. And, much to my amazement every time that I ride, cars generally give bikes lots of room!

    Check this out:
    http://www.coloradoan.com/apps/pbcs....ID=20106040326

  22. #22
    M8 M12 M15 deez nuts
    Reputation: Leopold Porkstacker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    8,443
    Quote Originally Posted by TobyGadd
    One-way, my commute takes about 50 minutes by bike, or 25 minutes by car (17 miles one way, or 34 miles round-trip).
    Mine, too, is 17 miles one way (well, between 14.6 and 17 depending on which route I take), the average time by car is 42 minutes, and the average by bike is 53 minutes. Not really much difference there. Oh, and this is on a single speed bike with tiny 36t x 17t gearing, by the way.
    Donít frail and blow if youíre going to Braille and Flow.

  23. #23
    A guy on a bike Moderator
    Reputation: TobyGadd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    982
    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker
    Mine, too, is 17 miles one way (well, between 14.6 and 17 depending on which route I take), the average time by car is 42 minutes, and the average by bike is 53 minutes. Not really much difference there. Oh, and this is on a single speed bike with tiny 36t x 17t gearing, by the way.
    Wow, that's a long time either way. Pretty cool that bike commiting only adds 20 minutes to your day though. I sometimes have a hard time finding/justifying a extra hour per day, with work, family, etc. all competing for my time.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,501
    weird.
    came from recreational obviously, because who starts out biking as a commuter?
    yeah i bike recreationaly.
    would never just commute, have a hard time believing anyone ONLY commutes?
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  25. #25
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    Quote Originally Posted by byknuts
    weird.
    came from recreational obviously, because who starts out biking as a commuter?
    yeah i bike recreationaly.
    would never just commute, have a hard time believing anyone ONLY commutes?
    I don`t know why that sounds so strange to you. As you know, biking is a pretty good way to get around, though better in some places than others. For anybody without a car, pedaling sure beats walking a few miles/Kms on a regular basis.

  26. #26
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    12,300
    Here, lots of people ride bikes just because it is practical.
    - The school might be a bit far for walking and you don't want the bus
    - Your friend lives a km away: the bike is faster than walking and it is silly to use the car for such distances
    - Finding a parking space near the city library is impossible but there's always a slot or two available in the bike rack.
    - You might enjoy cruising the paths to work. Who knows, you might like it enough to make cycling a hobby...

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TwoHeadsBrewing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2,949
    Quote Originally Posted by byknuts
    weird.
    came from recreational obviously, because who starts out biking as a commuter?
    yeah i bike recreationaly.
    would never just commute, have a hard time believing anyone ONLY commutes?

    Yes, this is impossible. I try to be very serious when I commute and not have any fun, but dammit I just can't keep the smile off my face for at least part of the ride to work. This morning was especially hard with temp of 62F and a crystal clear sky.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    681
    I ride off-road as well as commute. I bike-commute mostly for the training (though I like to think I'm helping the enviro as well) and off-road MTB for fun. I'm really a old MTB guy who has since switched focus to running (road and track racing) and squeeze in MTB whenever I can. I figure commuting by bike is a easy way to get some saddle time as well as get some training benefit.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Steve121's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    113
    Commuting is what brought me to mountain biking. There was a time I didn t had a car and need a good and fast way to get to the office.I used a friend bicycle for few months ( Very old and crappy bicycle btw). But it was so enjoyeable to do this ,my passion went up for pedalling.

    This leaded me to buy a new bicycle and use it to commute and to do off road. My commmute is about 10 miles (20 miles a day on both ways) .Im dojng off road every Sunday rain or no rain.

    Bought a new car 2 months ago and guess what?? The next morning,the car stayed at home and me on the saddle to go to work.
    Life is short-Live it full throttle !!

  30. #30
    M8 M12 M15 deez nuts
    Reputation: Leopold Porkstacker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    8,443
    Quote Originally Posted by TobyGadd
    Wow, that's a long time either way. Pretty cool that bike commiting only adds 20 minutes to your day though. I sometimes have a hard time finding/justifying a extra hour per day, with work, family, etc. all competing for my time.
    Most of the god damn traffic signals are on timers, that is why, and none of them seem synchronised from one intersection to the other.

    The one timed signal that reeeeeeally pisses me off has pissed me off since the mid-1980s, and it is at the intersection of Kifer Road and Wolfe Road in Sunnyvale, CA. Wolfe is a 35MPH zone, although people go as fast as they think they can handle, so it seems, and Kifer is a 40MPH zone. Well, Wolfe is set for green lights for intervals of 3+ minutes, whereas unless the crosswalk signal button is pushed, Kifer light stays green for maybe 15 seconds maximum. It’s been this way since about 1988… or maybe that was the year I started paying attention to how lame it is. One of the real problems is that the traffic on Wolfe coming down the hill from the overpass usually are doing 50+MPH, so plenty of accidents and near-misses happen weekly.

    Anyhow, if there were no stop signs, traffic signals or cross traffic, I could keep up my 17.6MPH pace the whole way (17.6MPH seems to be the maximum prolonged comfortable speed I am capable of with this limited gearing setup on this heavy-ass bike). When I used to ride it on my road bike I believe my best time was 46 minutes… once again, the pace being dictated by stop signs, traffic signals, and cross traffic.
    Donít frail and blow if youíre going to Braille and Flow.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,501
    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    I don`t know why that sounds so strange to you. As you know, biking is a pretty good way to get around, though better in some places than others. For anybody without a car, pedaling sure beats walking a few miles/Kms on a regular basis.
    no, what i meant was that i don't think anyone started biking only to commute, didn't everyone start biking for fun?
    if you started for fun, why would you stop just because you started commutting?
    I understand people who commute seriously, I just think it would be weird if someone just stopped riding recreationally, but kept riding as a commuter.

    although I've met some grumpy commuters on spotless mountain bikes so maybe they never ride for fun?
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  32. #32
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    Oh. I thought you meant that you didn`t think anybody started biking only to commute, rather than start biking for fun.

  33. #33
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    18,453
    I learned to ride bikes when I was little, same as everyone else. But I didn't ride from when I was 8 until I was about 14, and started riding again as a way to go to school.

    So I'd say that as an adult, I started riding to commute, not for fun. That led me into riding for fun too, but that wasn't until a few years later.

    I think a reasonably athletic person in a city can almost always beat a 2+ bus travel time by riding a bike. A huge portion of the travel time involved in any trip within a city is waiting at traffic signals or standing around waiting for a bus (and then waiting at traffic signals and bus stops.) So I don't think getting into cycling for purely practical purposes is really that farfetched an idea, especially if the person doesn't have a car for age or financial reasons.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.