How do you handle the day after a long ride.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    How do you handle the day after a long ride.

    So yesterday I spent 6 hours in the saddle. This morning I rolled outta bed at 6:15 walked out to the garage and just starred at my bike. I stood there for 5 mins stiff as a board and in pain and decided that I was taking the car.

    Those of you that commute daily, how do you handle the day after a long ride. I'm considering getting rid of my car and being a one car family and I'm not sure how to handle days like this. I can work around having one car, but getting up at 6:15 and realizing I can't ride to work would be a big bummer if I didn't have a car...
    Quote Originally Posted by Malibu412
    Cableb!tch: living, breathing proof you can be right and.still be a dick.

  2. #2
    ride the moment
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    No shame in taking the car after a raging day on the bike. My commute is only 2 miles now so I can just go slow, but otherwise I would drive. You could always get a small motorcycle for personal transport and at least save money on gas and insurance.
    Hey Butthead, are we gonna die? - Beavis

  3. #3
    weirdo
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    As for how I handle it, it`s pretty simple- my commute is very short, so not much temptation to climb into my truck.

    If that doesn`t apply to you, what Dogbrain said makes sense to me. Keep working on your methods and eventually you might develope a painless way to do without one of your motor vehicles. For what it`s worth, I don`t plan on ever being without my own personal MV, but I applaud those who make it work.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Cabletwitch View Post
    So yesterday I spent 6 hours in the saddle. This morning I rolled outta bed at 6:15 walked out to the garage and just starred at my bike. I stood there for 5 mins stiff as a board and in pain and decided that I was taking the car.

    Those of you that commute daily, how do you handle the day after a long ride. I'm considering getting rid of my car and being a one car family and I'm not sure how to handle days like this. I can work around having one car, but getting up at 6:15 and realizing I can't ride to work would be a big bummer if I didn't have a car...
    well firstly you increased your mileage too quickly....building up eliminates that painful morning...

    secondly you didn't mamage your output effectively on the 6 hour ride....no cooldown, rode too hard for too long....didn't pace properly....

    thirdly you should be able to commute anyways maybe just at a slower easier pace...

  5. #5
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    I don't have a long commute its less than 8 miles each way. The 6 hour ride was actually 4 hours on dirt and two on pavement on my road bike. The 4 hours were done at a pretty slow pace, but the road ride was a thrash to get to my in laws before dinner, this is where I really killed myself.

    Its not that I couldn't have ridden to work, but I allow myself 25 mins for my commute and I don't think I could have done it.

    All is well I rode the bike to work today and even towed my dog in the kids trailer.
    Quote Originally Posted by Malibu412
    Cableb!tch: living, breathing proof you can be right and.still be a dick.

  6. #6
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    I found two things that pay huge dividends the day after a big ride.
    1- Drink a protein powder drink once I get home.
    2- Do some stretching- especially the hamstrings and lower back. The more the better.
    I think the commute the day after is great for recovery. Very easy spinning is the key for me. The more fit I get, the harder I can go on my recovery day. If I do two hard days in a row- nothing wrong in no bike time the third day.
    The post ride drink does wonders. Wished I knew that back in my racing days!

  7. #7
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    Going to one car is more practical if you can actually share it. Could one of you drop the other off if you can't ride, or maybe carpool with a co-worker?

  8. #8
    Wanderer
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    I have no problem taking the car when I am worn out.

    I thought about getting rid of the car but it is handy to have around at times.

    Another option is getting rid of the car and getting a cheap used motorcycle.

  9. #9
    Bedwards Of The West
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    I give myself a big cushion on the commute anyway, so on days when I'm destroyed from the Sunday group ride or whatever torture I put myself through the day before, I can just take it really easy on the commute. I find that I feel better after after an easy spin to work than if I don't do anything. Definitely helps with the recovery after a big ride.

    I started out trying to be intentional about giving myself 15 extra minutes or so for a potential flat tire repair on the commute, then I wanted more cooldown time once I got to work...those two chunks of time became routine, so now I'm at work nice and early... taking the ride in to work seriously slow only costs me 10 minutes or so at the most, so no worries. My advice is just to avoid putting yourself in the position where it's "hammer time" or drive... build some granny gear time into your schedule and you'll be fine.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  10. #10
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    Thanks for the suggestions guys. My wife keeps telling me I need to try using a recovery drink but I'm just not a big fan of that kinda stuff (I don't use Gels either and I try to avoid power/protein bars). As much as I'd like to get rid of the car its probably just as easy to keep it, its 13 years old, reliable, and payed for. I think I just might have to suck it up and get up earlier or drive my car on occasion.

    Some days its just a ***** to get outta bed at 6am to ride to work, but its still better than getting up at 6am to drive to work.

    I'm really enjoying bike commuting, I used to do it a couple days a week at best but three weeks straight and I'm loving it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Malibu412
    Cableb!tch: living, breathing proof you can be right and.still be a dick.

  11. #11
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    Depends how I feel. I have no problem driving in. This weekend is a 60 mile group road ride on Saturday so I'll be driving to work Friday
    :wq

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Cabletwitch View Post
    Some days its just a ***** to get outta bed at 6am to ride to work, but its still better than getting up at 6am to drive to work.
    Maybe you need to get to bed earlier? I wake up at 5:30 AM just so I can ride my bike to work and be there for 8.
    "I have one speed. I have one gear: Go." -- Charlie Sheen

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Cabletwitch View Post
    Thanks for the suggestions guys. My wife keeps telling me I need to try using a recovery drink but I'm just not a big fan of that kinda stuff (I don't use Gels either and I try to avoid power/protein bars). As much as I'd like to get rid of the car its probably just as easy to keep it, its 13 years old, reliable, and payed for. I think I just might have to suck it up and get up earlier or drive my car on occasion.

    Some days its just a ***** to get outta bed at 6am to ride to work, but its still better than getting up at 6am to drive to work.

    I'm really enjoying bike commuting, I used to do it a couple days a week at best but three weeks straight and I'm loving it.
    What do you eat on a long ride?? Even someone who's kinda overweight would start having low-cal weirdness on a long four-hour ride...

    It sounds like you just upped your volume. Whether or not you think of it as training, that's going to make it a little harder to recover, etc. until you get used to it. In another couple weeks, you'll be wondering how this could have been a problem for you. I just start a little slower if I've had a big day the day before. In most riding environments, the effect on a person's time is minimal - as long as you pedal continuously and at a decent cadence, the difference in speed between an easy effort level and a hard effort level is not that great, and if there are stop signs and lights along your route, you lose a lot more time standing around than what you might lose from riding slower during the parts when you're moving.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  14. #14
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    I was a little stiff this morning after riding a while yesterday, but I rode in to work today anyway and the stiffness really went away within the first couple miles.

    Typically on long rides I'll stop half way and choke down a clif bar, but being a bit overweight I try and keep my food intake to a minimum.

    I go to sleep between 9 and 10 just about every night, I just hate getting up in the morning. I actually don't have to get up any earlier to ride my bike which is nice its a 10 minute car ride or a 25 min bike ride, and I save that extra 15 mins by not waking anybody else up in my house, I just crawl outta bed jump on the bike and shower at work.
    Quote Originally Posted by Malibu412
    Cableb!tch: living, breathing proof you can be right and.still be a dick.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Cabletwitch View Post
    Typically on long rides I'll stop half way and choke down a clif bar, but being a bit overweight I try and keep my food intake to a minimum.
    You need to run a calorie deficit day in day out if you want to lose weight...Doh...

    But when riding or exerting yourself you do need to fuel your body properly....that means eating at least every two hours...you shouldn't be choking down food.... carry something you like, and enjoy it.

    After the ride you should replace the calories you burned within two hours of the ride...

    The calorie deficit should be made up at other meals.

  16. #16
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    Agreed, I always bring along some granola bars and a snickers. Never let me body run low on fuel!

  17. #17
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    soak in warm water and stretch works most of the time

  18. #18
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    ^^ When it doesn't, a tube of arnica gel soothes sore muscles,joints,and even bruises. I keep some on hand. It's a homeopathic plant based anti-inflammatory. Sold in some drugstores, co-ops, natural food stores, etc. It works.

  19. #19
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    I ran track all four years of High school, YOU learn to stretch even after practice is over. Same goes for long bike rides. Stretch for about 15 minutes then take a nice warm shower usually does it for me

  20. #20
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    Advil before and after always works for me... Man 6 hours in the saddle all mountain biking? I easily can do this on a road bike, but mountain biking? Good for you!

  21. #21
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    ^^^
    If it's just a long ride, and not a race or something, it's actually easier for me.

    I move around a lot more on a mountain bike. By the end of a long road ride, I'm pretty stiff, even if I try to mix up my riding position some.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Cabletwitch View Post
    Thanks for the suggestions guys. My wife keeps telling me I need to try using a recovery drink but I'm just not a big fan of that kinda stuff (I don't use Gels either and I try to avoid power/protein bars). As much as I'd like to get rid of the car its probably just as easy to keep it, its 13 years old, reliable, and payed for. I think I just might have to suck it up and get up earlier or drive my car on occasion.

    Some days its just a ***** to get outta bed at 6am to ride to work, but its still better than getting up at 6am to drive to work.

    I'm really enjoying bike commuting, I used to do it a couple days a week at best but three weeks straight and I'm loving it.
    If you dont like protien drinks afterwards, I would try just a glass of milk. It helps me alot after long rides. All of this was good advice though. Proper cool down, stretching, nutrition, is key.

  23. #23
    Green Wrencher
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    That's a long commute.

    Motorcycle was mentioned but i was thinking more about a moped. faster than a bike and smaller than a motorcycle that needs insurance.

  24. #24
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    Man, so you guys are riding long distance on a mountain bike? Really? What changes do you make? Do you change out your forks? Or use a lockout?

  25. #25
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I have a fork with a real damper, that works.

    Seriously, though, if I ride for distance on my MTB, typically it's off-road. If I ride for distance on the road, I do it on a road bike.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  26. #26
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    I do have a lockout, but hardly use it because im always switching from road, to sidewalk, to trail, hopping curbs and potholes. The biggest difference was the kenda slicks I put on. 26"x1.95", I love them, super quiet and still sturdy enough to handle the broken glass,screws and bolts, metal shards, yard debris, car brake pads and what ever else the bike lane wants to throw at me.

  27. #27
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    I do 24 miles round trip to the gym usually 3 times a week. And 2 days a week I do 22 miles round trip to my other job. Its definatly not 6 hours worth, but its a nice little ride. If I had a road bike I could probly do ALOT more.

  28. #28
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    http://www.velominati.com/blog/the-rules/

    See rule #5

    Just kidding.



    Let me give you some facts about me. Zero car family (by choice), commute 20K (longer when I mix commuting and high intensity training) round trip every weekday, all grocery runs/errands are done by bike, training for a 300K road event and a 90K MTB event. I have a 110% understanding of where you are coming from. I can share some of what I have learned.

    To keep myself sane, I have to take the view of some commuting days as active recovery. Sometimes going as far at moving my stem upwards or flipping it. If I breathe through my mouth, I am working too hard. I've considered buying a beach crusier or the like for these days.

    I would be willing to bet that if you jumped on the bike and rode to work at a super low intensity, your legs would feel great.

    However.....overtraining will sap all your motivation, make you grumpy, f with your mind. Make sure you are eating directly post ride with the intention of recovery after hard efforts like 6 hours. Make sure you are fueling and hydrating during a long ride like that.

    Ride it, leave the car at home.

  29. #29
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    Thanks for all the advise guys. This weekend we are officially temporarily a one car family. My wife's car need brakes and I'm dragging my feet to see how this pans out. I probably won't fix it for at least a week.

    This morning kinda sucked, I've been making it a habit of driving on Sundays after beating on my self on Saturdays (which yesterday was done in the form of lawn care!) so I realized I couldn't drive at 6:30 this morning. I had to rush on the bike to work, but I'm here and my wife can still go to church.
    Quote Originally Posted by Malibu412
    Cableb!tch: living, breathing proof you can be right and.still be a dick.

  30. #30
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    How did you make out on your ride?

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by lov2bike01 View Post
    How did you make out on your ride?
    My wife and I have to stop, we haven't figured out how to do that while riding.

    That's not what you're talking about is it?

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