How do you get a "New" bike with essentially no money?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    A God Without A Name
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    How do you get a "New" bike with essentially no money?

    So here's the thing.

    I love my bike



    I picked every part myself. she rides fantastic and is my car replacement.

    So why would I ever want to get rid of her?

    The Truth?

    I got less fat. I built this bike at a time when riding it to its limits was well beyond mine. And I rode it like crazy, Now I've exceeded its limits. With a MTB drivetrain I just can NOT get the speeds I want on road. and I don't really want to swap road kit onto this frame. beyond that, with 26 inch tires my high PSI road tires are a bit limited. and at the speeds I ride this thing... they're fidgety.

    So now I've gotten to the point where I know what my next bike is. My problem is I ain't got no money. Just a real nice bike

    I honestly just want a 54cm Cross Check, singlespeed with V brakes and Drop Bars. It would have cost me so much less had I bought that from the start instead of building this thing...

    So after that poorly thought out rant, the question is... How does someone with no money trade a "1,600ish dollar" (new, in parts... I know nothing of its real value now) for a bike that new is around 1,100ish?

  2. #2
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    I don't know how much it's worth either, but it wouldn't cost you anything to post it for $999 firm (or whatever) on Craigslist and cross you fingers. Sing its praises, especially the custom stuff you put on. Polish it. Re-read some of the ad copy that made you buy it and borrow liberally. "Sacrifice" and such words that suggest a great deal is to be had can help. I you don't get any interest, so be it. You only need 1 buyer. I have sometimes been amazed to only get 1 call for an item, but actually have that person buy it.

  3. #3
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    Also, really good pictures do help. So if you have a DSLR or know someone with a DLSR and actually KNOW how to use it, see if they'll do a "photoshoot" of your bike.
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  4. #4
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    Thanks! this is actually really helpful!

  5. #5
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    Already? Man, you just finished building it!
    I`m probably in the top one percent of the worlds worst buyers and sellers, so I won`t even attempt to tell you how to pull that off. But why don`y you just put a road crank on it to get you around while you save your pennies, then buy your Crosscheck and keep both bikes?

  6. #6
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    Do you have a local bike shop that sells used bikes? If so, take it down there and show them what you got. Tell them what you are looking for. Maybe they can find a used one, or maybe you can work some sort of trade-in or trade-up. Maybe a little cash will have to change hands as part of the deal. Make sure they know that you intend to do a lot of business with them if you can work something out.

    If that does not work, you can always turn to crime...

  7. #7
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I forget how big your crank is. As you know the rings are interchangeable.

    Since it's a disc bike, you can also drop a set of 700C wheels in. You need a set with 135mm disc hubs. (I think bicyclewheelwarehouse does some, or you can build your own.) That'll get you some more gear inches.

    What's your cadence? If it's not north of 90, you're out of gear because your technique sucks.

    EDIT: Also, whine on Facebook. Last time I did that, I ended up with a Trek Portland for a lot less than your budget. Awesome bike.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Naturally Aspirated View Post
    Also, really good pictures do help. So if you have a DSLR or know someone with a DLSR and actually KNOW how to use it, see if they'll do a "photoshoot" of your bike.
    DSLR not required. Only need someone who knows what they're doing. I have taken better shots with my 2006-era 5 megapixel point and shoot than some people with 10+ megapixels DSLRs. The camera is just a tool. Good photos are results of skill in using the tool.

  9. #9
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    Are those 26" wheels? Bigger wheels/tires will increase your effective gearing. Maybe upgrade to 650b wheels with 36-42mm tires? You might even have room in there for 700c road wheels/tires.

  10. #10
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    Craigslist.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  11. #11
    jrm
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    I used my tax return

    and bought last years defy 1 on clearance.

  12. #12
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    I just bought Kathryn a circa 1980 Peugeot Mixte for $45 from the local bicycle recycling center. he had a nice Centurion there too (too small for me). Point is a very affordable bike with a 52-14 or 52-13 top can be had for cheap. Can be upgraded or used until you save for what you want and sold for what it cost. Oh, and they are less desirable to thieves.

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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    What's your cadence? If it's not north of 90, you're out of gear because your technique sucks.
    +1.

    OP, your bike looks sweet, and a month ago I would have said keep it and make some modifications here and there to achieve what you're going for, but after building my own CX bike and riding the **** out of it in the last week, I gotta say go for it. The CX bike allows me to ride just about everything I could handle on the SS 9er, and then some.

    Looking at all the bling on your bike, I'll bet you could get a decent start on the cross check just by parting out some of those components on fleabay or craigslist. And if a used bike jives with your comfort-zone, you might be surprised how cheap you can find a relatively new surly. Good luck, keep us posted.
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  14. #14
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    Oh! a lot of feedback! let me try to reply...

    @Rodar: Yeah, I know! But I ride street every day of the week. A More street friendly machine is needed!

    @Woodway: Skyline does. but he doesn't seem to interested in helping anyone out. he's got a lot on his plate so I understand... that being said there isn't really a standout bike shop in Northern Utah...I think northern Utah cyclists are partly to blame.

    @Andrw: We played with some 700c wheels last night at our local community bike shop. The Soma has a TON of space in the rear. I'd not be shocked if I could fit a small 29er tire in there. but the point of this thread is I have no money. and all new gears and wheels would cost so much that I'd be 80% of the way from having bought the next bike... which I want for its road friendly characteristics.

    the right tool for the right job and all. The Soma is fantastic. its just not being used for its intended purpose.

    (pretty sure my crank is a 175)

    And while I don't know my actual cadence. My form is pretty good when I pay attention to it... So I'm not to worried about that.

    ALSO. I don't have a whole lot of facebook buddies who cycle.

    @Jseko: My roommate stole my camera. she won't tell me why or how. but hopefully she can take some nice pics of her bible study group, her Sunday school class or her Christian Womens Group, Or her Military Wives Church group with that camera she stole. I bet Jesus will dig them.

    @steve: See reply to Andrw

    @Commuter: we dont really do a lot of craigslist in Utah. but it is on KSL. which is our version of that.

    @jrm: I have not paid taxes this year... as I am a broke college student. I paid for the soma by getting run over... seems I should go ride Salmon some more!

    @Brian: I volunteer at My local center. The problem is finding a decent frame that fits. We do have glorious amount of early 90's rigid Specializeds and Trek MTBs... some of which are fantastic.If one comes in my size thats NOT thrashed I'd ride it.

    @Spinny: yeah, I need to learn to cycle more seriously. but I know how to exercise seriously and how to monitor things... So I must make do.

    And yeah. I feel like a CX bike is going to enjoy the road more than an XC. I need something at home on the road. that lets me ride IN traffic instead of outside of it.

  15. #15
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    I think you only need to do one of the new chain ring or new wheels. You don't need a new cassette to go with a new wheel, and you can probably fit new wheels inside of $300. I always have.

    You can always try to find a 1:1 swap on Craig's List. If you try to do this by buying and selling, though, you're most likely going to have to kick in more money one way or another. And with all due respect, you're going to decide that you screwed up with the Cross Check in a few months if you buy one. Either it'll be too heavy and you'll want a proper road bike, or it won't be right for touring and you'll want a LHT, or it won't have good enough stopping power and you'll want disc brakes again, or you'll want a racier 'cross bike, or...

    Throw your Soma on a trainer (do it at a shop if you don't own one) and count your cadence. Get to a nice, comfortable spin, count the number of times your right knee comes up in fifteen seconds, multiply by four. While I don't think it's impossible to have good form on flat pedals, my experience is that newish cyclists who learn on flat pedals rarely do. That said, I can also read a gear chart and know that the speed limit for 26" wheels with slicks and MTB gearing is not that high, even for someone with a really nice spin. So I wouldn't be too surprised if you need at least one of a bigger chainring, bigger wheels, or pedals with some retention to get your top speeds up a little more. Maybe it's not a new bike, but you put some time and effort into getting this one "just so." Starting over is going to cost more than you think it will, it'll probably require a revision at least as significant as the ones I'm suggesting, so I'd be pretty surprised if you don't save yourself a lot of money (not to mention screwing around) revising this one to better match what you now want.

    Anyway, a Cross Check will just look like another Cross Check. Pretty much whatever you do to it, because they're already common with different builds and various alt. bars. This bike is unique to you, which you said was one of your major goals.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agwan View Post
    @Spinny: yeah, I need to learn to cycle more seriously. but I know how to exercise seriously and how to monitor things... So I must make do.
    Uhm.... I just want to make it clear that while I agreed with Andrw that your technique (especially regarding cadence) MIGHT need some improvement, no where in my post did I assume to have any idea what your level of dedication to cycling or exercising was, nor did I make any suggestions about it. I said "nice bike, get a cross bike if you feel like that's what you need, good luck".
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  17. #17
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    On the craigslist front, what I usually do is a tour of the garage... start selling everything BUT the bike, and add a second bike to the herd rather than trading out of a bike that you enjoy. Sounds like you want something quite a bit different, that will probably cost less. I'd bee looking at ways to get that TOO, not getting rid of a bike that is still so new...yet.

    I'm selling some jeep parts this weekend and putting the money towards the next bike...
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  18. #18
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    Agwan, is there a bike co-op near you? I volunteer at my local one, and there are always a few really cheap road machines for sale. The chances of getting a cross bike are basically zero, but if you could find a bike-boom 10spd for $50 maybe that would tide you over for awhile? Either that or police auctions?

    Edited to say that I see Brian already asked that. Oops.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jseko View Post
    DSLR not required. Only need someone who knows what they're doing. I have taken better shots with my 2006-era 5 megapixel point and shoot than some people with 10+ megapixels DSLRs. The camera is just a tool. Good photos are results of skill in using the tool.
    Sure DSLR is not required, but it is preferred. I've been shooting for years also, and a s****y point and shoot is still a s****y point and shoot. You can have all the skill in the world, the image quality is only as good as your tool. That's why I said to have someone that can actually USE a DSLR take photos...
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  20. #20
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    Take this advice from someone who has sold plenty of bikes that he bought/built and lost lots of money just to chase an idea of an "ideal" bike - Selling it this soon after building it isn't worth it. I don't know how long you've had the bike for, but I gather that it's relatively new.

    Looking at your set up, I can spot a couple of minor things that might make your Soma feel quicker. Get lighter tires. Possibly gear higher (larger chain ring if possible). Tighter range, road cassette wouldn't hurt. Lowering the bars in my experience will make it feel more responsive and faster, but will also definitely affect reach and comfort. Something to consider though if your flexibility will allow it (it's also free). I would say go with drops, but you will probably rarely if ever ride in the drops (even on a cross check) so it isn't worth the money. Get some form of foot retention. Clipless will give you a lot more control while pedaling at speed. It will make a big difference if speed's what you're worried about.

    I also doubt you will get $900 for your bike. If your local CL market is lively enough, then maybe $800. I'm not trying to be mean or negative, I'm just speaking from experience. Your bike is awesome, I would keep it. Rigid MTB's really are a pretty ideal commuter in my opinion.

    If you do decide to get rid of it, try trading it for a CX or Road bike of equal value. You will probably lose less money that way.

  21. #21
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    sorry, thought this was a question about how to get a bike for essentially no money.

    rocky mountain experience frame, headset, fork, front derailleur, bb and brakes- 50$.
    how to be the one person who snags it?
    contact quickly, be available to meet immediately, give your name and number, show up on time, with cash in hand.

    THAT'S HOW!

    in your case the question really is: "can I get what I want from selling the old bike to buy the new bike I want"
    the answer is- can't hurt to try
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  22. #22
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    That's such a sweet build. I'd hate to see you lose her. Have you considered keeping it, riding it and saving up your pennies until you can build another. Then you'd have two bikes.
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  23. #23
    knock-knock...
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    Why is just getting a larger front chainring not a solution to your problem?

    Now I've exceeded its limits. With a MTB drivetrain I just can NOT get the speeds I want on road. and I don't really want to swap road kit onto this frame. beyond that, with 26 inch tires my high PSI road tires are a bit limited. and at the speeds I ride this thing... they're fidgety.
    Your handlebars look really high to me. I'd try running them a bit lower, you have plenty of room and it will enable you to get a bit more weight on the front tire, to really keep it planted in the corners and make it feel more stable. You'd also be in a bit more aggressive position for pedalling. Frankly, that bike looks sweet to me.

    I know money is an issue here, but would it be possible to try a fork with a bit more rake or slightly higher axel-to-crown as well? That would also increase the feeling of stability.

    I'd bet with a larger chainring and your bars an inch or so below your saddle you might realize you have a pretty sweet setup going on.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by skottt160 View Post
    I'd bet with a larger chainring and your bars an inch or so below your saddle you might realize you have a pretty sweet setup going on.
    And you could even add a larger red chainring to that crank, but not bother with a front derailleur. That's what I'm doing for the winter - I spend 99% of the time in the big ring, but if there's a dump of snow or if I know that I'll be doing lots of icy climbing then I'll just manually pull the chain over to the granny.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by skottt160 View Post
    Why is just getting a larger front chainring not a solution to your problem?



    Your handlebars look really high to me. I'd try running them a bit lower, you have plenty of room and it will enable you to get a bit more weight on the front tire, to really keep it planted in the corners and make it feel more stable. You'd also be in a bit more aggressive position for pedalling. Frankly, that bike looks sweet to me.

    I know money is an issue here, but would it be possible to try a fork with a bit more rake or slightly higher axel-to-crown as well? That would also increase the feeling of stability.

    I'd bet with a larger chainring and your bars an inch or so below your saddle you might realize you have a pretty sweet setup going on.
    I ride a 46 tooth ring for that reason should cost about $50 bucks and ride on.

  26. #26
    I Tried Them ALL... SuperModerator
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    Easy= Start mowing lawns

    Hard= Ride straight into a car, blame them for cutting you off and file an insurance claim for replacing your bike and or injuries sustained.
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    Easy= Start mowing lawns

    Hard= Ride straight into a car, blame them for cutting you off and file an insurance claim for replacing your bike and or injuries sustained.
    Both solutions would be impossible here in New Mexico. No lawns to mow, and the motorists rarely get their deserved comeuppance.

    There's a local cyclist who recently took a woman to court because she admitted to police that she swerved into the shoulder to prevent him from passing her (and the dude ran into her car), and this is the outcome of the court proceedings: "Such BS!! She took a plea which dropped her charges of careless driving and driving w/o a license in exchange for guilty on hit and run. They fined her $300 with 90 days in jail but deferred all of that for 90 days as long as she stays out of trouble. So she paid $45 in court costs."
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  28. #28
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    that's actually how I funded THIS bike. got ran over but only suffered bruises and scrapes... got a check for $1,100 dollars... about 500 of my own on top of that... and I had my THEN dream bike!

    on the chainring issue... its total vanity. the largest e.13 guidering is 40t. so thats what I bought... so I dropped 4 teeth but also dropped two gears I NEVER used.

    I've had the stem flipped... it did plant my front wheel a tiny bit better... but I really dont have any issues keeping the tires down in the turns. as they are now, makes my riding position REALLY comfy. and great for cruising. All my other angles seem fine. my closest thing to a complaint is how... unhappy it is at higher speeds. MTB's just don't seem intended to go past a certain speed.

    And to be totally honest. My bike is amazing. its entirely dialed in. every single part now functions in perfect harmony with the next. and every part is the exact part I wanted...

    so... now its finished... and I have nothing left to do but maintenance...

    building this thing was addictive... particularly the fine tuning after I got all the parts together... I want more!

    Also... this thing is just... too good. too easy. In getting it dialed in I made it so nothing on it is a challenge anymore... I almost want a lesser bike to experience a greater challenge...

    I know. I'm nuts.

  29. #29
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    ^ sounds like you really just need to get yourself a project bike. Keep the current ride, and wait awhile for something your size to show up at the recycling center.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    ^ sounds like you really just need to get yourself a project bike. Keep the current ride, and wait awhile for something your size to show up at the recycling center.
    +1.

    I have a bike downstairs in pieces right now. It's undergoing a major revision after it had a little incident last season. But, it doesn't take me to school and I don't train on it except from August through December, so whatever.

    Did the NM cyclist take the woman to civil court? Once someone gets convicted of committing a crime, if they're then sued for it, it's supposed to be a slam-dunk case, at least in my state. Granted the judge might only give the cyclist what it cost him to deal with post-crash issues, but (again in my state) damage multipliers are certainly a possibility...
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  31. #31
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    oh, also bbg has a 44t, 4bolt bashguard which is pretty cheap, and comes in red ano. Products

  32. #32
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    I don't know if he is considering civil court. That's not a bad idea, and I'll pass it his way for sure. There is legislation currently in the works here that is seeking harsher penalties for motorists who are found to be at fault in a cyclist's death but we're second class citizens on the road here. The trails are amazing and most are city maintained. It's a weird place.

    OP, time to start watching craigslist. It's fun to have a project bike.

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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by jseko View Post
    DSLR not required. Only need someone who knows what they're doing. I have taken better shots with my 2006-era 5 megapixel point and shoot than some people with 10+ megapixels DSLRs. The camera is just a tool. Good photos are results of skill in using the tool.
    very true... i've seen some amazing shots from cell phones... I know many people with a DSLR that don't know anything other then the "green" setting... give me a point and shoot and a STILL object and i'll get the shot I want... something with motion though and PnS sucks lol... but that wasn't the discussion we where having eh? lol


    anyway back to the OP...

    the thing you need to speed up (if you're spinning out) is to push a bigger gear... you can do that with bigger tires (big apples or the likes), bigger wheels (650b/29er), or higher gearing (bigger chainring)... the cheapest is going to be that chainring...
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  34. #34
    jrm
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    Part it out

    and keep the parts that you could use for the CC build ie; the mech brakes, seat/post, crank and then sell the rest. You shoul have more then enough $$$.

  35. #35
    knock-knock...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agwan View Post
    I've had the stem flipped... it did plant my front wheel a tiny bit better... but I really dont have any issues keeping the tires down in the turns. as they are now, makes my riding position REALLY comfy. and great for cruising. All my other angles seem fine. my closest thing to a complaint is how... unhappy it is at higher speeds. MTB's just don't seem intended to go past a certain speed.

    And to be totally honest. My bike is amazing. its entirely dialed in. every single part now functions in perfect harmony with the next. and every part is the exact part I wanted...
    I guess I just don't really have a good conception of what you mean by "mtb's just don't seem intended to go past a certain speed." Does it wobble? What's the action of the bike that makes it unhappy, what characteristic makes it unseemly at speed? This seems to be what we need to identify.

    I guess when a bike has felt uncomfortable at speed, it's always been in the corners for me.

    I feel kinda connected to to this, because in the past I have messed around racing a 26" mtb frame during road season when I was in college, and I looved finishing in front of the guy who lines up next to you with 80mm deep dish wheels and a brand new Soloist at the line. I had a 26" mountain bike frame set up with an ebay (cosmetically blemished) carbon fork, 700c wheels and 9 speeds of friction shifting bliss in the back, running a single ring up front. I probably wasn't going very fast though, just somehow managed to get in the finish line cam a couple times. It can be done with a 26" frame though, that bike felt awesome.




    In the end, I actually think this bike turned out to be more stable than many of the road bikes I have ridden, where the rider's weight is too far forward, and not balanced between the wheels in the same way this bike is.

    Best of luck getting what you want. You could try tires with a softer compound or running them with a bit less psi so there is a larger contact patch with the ground? Or I bet you have the clearance to try out a pair of 700c wheels and road tires on that baby. That'd probably be worth a shot. I'm not sure what symptom we're trying to get to go away though if it is stable in corners at speed.

    In my opinion, you aren't going to move to a geometry that is inherently more comfortable at speed by going to a cross bike. It'll be a more aggressive pedaling position most likely, but I don't really know of any geometrical differences that will make it "intended to go that fast." About the only thing there that highlights itself would be the head angle, chainstay length and overall wheel base. Longer and slacker will feel more stable, and it seems the Soma would be winner on paper there over your average cross bike.
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  36. #36
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    The bike feeling squirmy at speed has less to do with 26" vs 700c than it does other variables. Quality of tires, quality of wheelbuild, frame characteristics (particularly with large frequency vibrations that can become destructive harmonic waves at speed - the dreaded "death wobble").

    So, I'd first do some dialing in to identify the source of the squirminess to see if there is an easy solution.

    I'm in SLC, and our perception of bike shops must differ. I like Saturday Cycles and Cyclesmith, in particular. That said, I tend to do all of my own work, and I frequently order my parts online due to time constraints as a corporate zombie working stiff (at least for now). Anyway, both shops are great,IMO, and there are a few others that are pretty good.

    Back on track, here's what I'd recommend:
    - Keep the soma. Ride it, and try to dial in on the issues at speed.
    - get a part time job (if at a bike shop, you should be able to get a huge discount)
    - sock some cash away. I know the weather is starting to get nice here, but it is technically still winter - give it a few months, save some money then consider your options at that point (buy new with shop discount, buy new from Bikesdirect, buy used from KSL/CL, etc)
    Since you seem to really like speed, and you already have a mountain bike (that you could convert back to a SS MTB), why not focus on a SS road bike? Why not a 1x8 or 1x9 road bike?

    Anyway, you have a nice bike. It is winter. take a brief step back, and consider the benefit of a part time job (waiting tables is another good way to make some cash - that's what I did in college, ya know, way back in the dark ages).

    Trying to sell a freshly built bike is a losing proposition IMO - you won't get what you put into it back out.

    Anywhoo, that's what is coming up for me at the moment.

  37. #37
    A God Without A Name
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    @Skott: thanks for the feedback/personal experience. I guess, in part... I just want the right tool for the job. the Soma is glorious, but I just have a hankering for a more road dedicated rig.
    @ canyon eagle:

    I'm on my third set of tires. Kenda Kwick Trax, so far they've been the best compromise. the only real issue in terms of handling is that I can coast to a speed well above what I can pedal to on my commute home. one long downhill slope. at those speeds I feel like I'd like to try a road bike. there is also the aspect of interacting with traffic. I imagine its much easier to be IN traffic on a road bike.

    I've not been to either of those shops. Skyline is by far the best shop we have out in Ogden... but its sometimes hard to get what you ask for there... its why I built the Soma, Skyline sold me on a Vaya, then said they could not get it. then sold me on a Karate Monkey, then told me I had to let them put the parts they wanted to get rid of on it. instead of the parts I asked for... also they wanted me to buy the old stock one instead of a fresh one in the color I requested.

    when I said "just sell me the factory build then" they magically couldn't order them.

    So I built my own.

    I'd kill for a job. I need a job. and I don't need much of a job. couple hundred dollars a paycheck keeps me fed and the phone on. Jobs are few and far between, I'm not proud. I'd take any job I'd be able to do well enough to please my employer.

    I've kinda accepted that unless someone feels like paying me a bit more than its worth, I'm just going to stick with this one. though a Raleigh Furley with some upgraded brakes would fall well below what this bike should sell for...

  38. #38
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    Bike swap

    Bike swap I was at had a new Surley cross check for sale, $500.

    What others said, sell bike, buy a different one. Make industry friends by being active in clubs and such...it may lead to a discounted new bike.

  39. #39
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    Aha! Ogden. I had assumed that you were at the U here. I'm not at all familiar with Ogden. Bummer of an experience at you LBS - that sucks.

  40. #40
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    I volunteer at a Collective (community bike shop) and in a few weeks I hope to be a keylist member... meaning I can order from the QBP catalog for cost plus 10%

    won't do me any good if I can't get work though.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agwan View Post
    I'm on my third set of tires. Kenda Kwick Trax, so far they've been the best compromise. the only real issue in terms of handling is that I can coast to a speed well above what I can pedal to on my commute home.
    When you were talking about the skittery front end - have you considered experimenting with lower tire pressures? Try the center of the range printed on the sidewall.

    If that doesn't help, less expensive than a new bike, and less money lost than selling yours as a used bike, and less work than parting it out, try some actually nice tires, like these.

    I know there are tires almost as good as Schwalbes for less $$ (but more than those Kendas) but I haven't had the patience to experiment and find them.

    But I hear you about the 54cm SS CC w/ V-brakes!

  42. #42
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    No I've run tires that cost a heck of a lot more than my Kenda's, My Kenda's are oddly satisfying and grippy. Its still amuses me that the nicest handling tires I've run are also the cheapest!

    I keep them in the ball park of 80 to 85 PSI, they do fine.

    The problem here is not some error or even something thats wrong with my bike. Its a great bike, its truly fantastic, I LOVE it. but its a mountain bike, thats where it belongs. that's its home. And I'm just ready to take one step closer to a road bike.

  43. #43
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    Bigger chainring, more aero riding position will do tons to increase your top speed.

    You're riding in a very upright position right now, throw a longer stem on and some drop bars to stretch out and get low. You'll be able to carry much faster speeds.

    As a plus, you'll have more weight over the front end and get rid of that 'wandering front end feeling' that you're getting from having too much weight up and back on the bike. High bars and a short stem keep your center of gravity high and back, unweighting the front end and making cornering feel sketchy.

  44. #44
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    Start saving for a 2012 Cannondale CAAD10/1...you'll be in biking Nirvana. This sub $2500 aluminum race bike performs on par with full carbon bikes costing $6000+...

    CAAD10 1 DURA ACE
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