Help me find Commuting Clothes- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Help me find Commuting Clothes

    I'm watching the summer change to fall and am preparing for a rainy and cold winter commuting season. Previously, I have only commuted in the summer, but this year I want to make a legitimate push and commute as much as I can in the winter. I have the bike, I have the bags, the only thing I'm missing is good winter commuting clothing.

    Really, when it comes down to it, I need some good bottoms for my commute and I am looking for any suggestions that you all may have. I have regular tights for roadie rides, but I'm looking for something not so "tight." Possibly like a baggy 3/4 length pant, or even a semi baggy full length running style pant. Really, I don't know what I'm looking for because I haven't seen it yet. Please help find great commuting clothes!

  2. #2
    Bedwards Of The West
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    How cold are we talking?

    I have sugoi 'sub zero' tights...they're good down to maybe 35 degrees F, and then I throw on one of my two pair of rain/wind pants...one pair is made by Bellweather, and the other is Columbia. I have found that the combo of the tights and the rain pants is ideal for me... I ride this way down do low single digits. I use neoprene socks also. The rain pants completely eliminate the wind, and the thick tights insulate.

    I am a huge fan of the softshell jacket... look at any mountaineering shop, REI, backcountry.com, etc... These jackets are meant to stop the wind and insulate, and most are pretty waterproof. I currently have a Mountain Hardware 'Synchro' softshell... pricy, but awesome. This is a jacket made for ice climbing, so the sleeves are really long for stretching out over your head, and it's got great seals on the cuffs and neck. Awesome cut for riding the bike. It does good in the rain also. I do have a Louis Garneau rain jacket for days when I know it's going to be very wet, but if it's just a chance of rain, I wear the softshell. In the depths of winter, I wear the softshell with nothing but a jersey or moisture wicking t-shirt under it...down to 3 or 4 degrees F. It is anything but bulky also...very thin and low profile, you'd never think it could insulate like that. Absolutely zero wind gets to your body through that thing.

    In the transition months, I have a couple pairs of leg warmers, so I can go with shorts and leg warmers in the morning, and just shorts for the warmer ride home. I also do the shorts/legwarmers, and rain pants sometimes in the morning, and then I have options for the way home. The temp can change quite a bit in the spring and fall where I'm at.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlyBoy
    I'm watching the summer change to fall and am preparing for a rainy and cold winter commuting season. Previously, I have only commuted in the summer, but this year I want to make a legitimate push and commute as much as I can in the winter. I have the bike, I have the bags, the only thing I'm missing is good winter commuting clothing.

    Really, when it comes down to it, I need some good bottoms for my commute and I am looking for any suggestions that you all may have. I have regular tights for roadie rides, but I'm looking for something not so "tight." Possibly like a baggy 3/4 length pant, or even a semi baggy full length running style pant. Really, I don't know what I'm looking for because I haven't seen it yet. Please help find great commuting clothes!

    I have the long tights with the wind proof fronts ( no pad), as it gets colder I add a pair of shorts under them (with a pad), than another set of tights (bigger) over top then a pair of fleece snow pants or wool pants, that takes me from 0 C down to -35 C.

  4. #4
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    I don't have a ton of cold, but lots of wet. I have waterproof pants and jacket. The jacket is REI's something or rather. The pants are cheap rubber pants from the local sporting good store. They button at the ankle so I don't rub on the ride. Since I don't like wet shoes, I usually go to a platform pedal with toe clips and then pull waterproof booties over old kicks. Long sleeve shirt, t-shirt and an old pair of pants cut down to knickers. Rock on.

  5. #5
    weirdo
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    You mention rain- I can`t help you with that one. How long is your ride?
    I use no cycling specific clothes whatsoever. Most of my commuting pants come from the thrift shop since for some reason they seem to have more suitable stuff than any "new clothes" stores (except the big money stuff at sporting goods places). My area is dyr for the most part, most wet rides are due to puddles and slush. Temps occasionally to zero F, but rarely below the teens. SInce it`s a fairly short commute, I get away with the cheap clothes I use. For a longer time, they might start getting uncomfortable.

    For pants, I have a few pairs of poly long johns, some lightweight nylon pants, and a pair of polyester old geezer pants. I just wear whatever combo I need from what I have available. The nylon pants have an extra button at the cuff, so they stay out of the chain. For the geezer pants I sewed a little "tack" in the back of the right cuff to keep them behaving too. In any case, the trick is to find stuff loose enough that it doesn`t bind and still not baggy.

    Shoes or boots- whatever I need from the closet. Platform pedals on my commuter, so I don`t have to worry about compatibility.

    Up top, a variety of poly T-shirts, poly long john tops, wool shirts, a fairly light shell and a fairly heavy shell.

    Also, assorted gloves and mittens (most of which can be stuffed inside or worn over another pair), goggles, clear and yellow glasses, a thin balaclava, and a couple knitted watch caps.

    Also, take a look here for ideas:
    http://www.icebike.org/

  6. #6
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    Wool Swobo leg warmers are super warm and you can wear them with baggies. I don't think there is any practical baggy pant you can wear for more than a few miles due to drive train issues. I tried wearing slacks for half a mile when I was showering off site and that was a disaster.

  7. #7
    jrm
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    Endura knickers

    seem to fit the bill here in the bay area.

  8. #8
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    Last winter I was comfy in knickers and knee length wool ski socks. I usually wore a pair of polypro liner under the woolys. I like the tall sock thing because you can push em down to vet a little heat if necessary.

  9. #9
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    Thanks for all the replies. I'm starting to get an idea of what might work best.

    I live in Germany. The commute each way is about 8 miles. Winter's tend to be rainy with temps hovering just above freezing in the morning. I have a couple different routes. One is all road and another is about 60% road, 40% dirt road.

    Seems like there is a need out there for a commuting specific clothing line or company. Maybe a joint venture should be in the works! Imagine not only being able to buy fenders, racks and bags, but any and all types of functional commuting clothes.

    Thanks again!

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