Have you had your saddle stolen?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Have you had your saddle stolen?

    I'm planning to start using my road bike more to commute. I have to lock my bike outside on a college campus so am wondering if I should swap out the saddle for a cheap $5 one that I don't care about or take the extra effort to lock the saddle with a cable leash.

    If you lock your bike outside, have you had your saddle stolen and/or do you lock your saddle?

  2. #2
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    I assume you mean they steal the seatpost as well?

    If you rarely/never adjust saddle height, could you replace the post binder bolt with some obscure torx size etc. that no saddle thief is likely to have?
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
    I'm planning to start using my road bike more to commute. I have to lock my bike outside on a college campus so am wondering if I should swap out the saddle for a cheap $5 one that I don't care about or take the extra effort to lock the saddle with a cable leash.

    If you lock your bike outside, have you had your saddle stolen and/or do you lock your saddle?
    Old bicycle chain - should have one. Punctured tube that you were too lazy to patch - should have at least one if not 5. Figure out how much chain you need to secure the rails to the bike. Figure out how much of the tube you need to cover the chain. Insert chain into tube and secure. Black electrical tape to finalize that tube. Should be pretty painless.

    I haven't had my saddle stolen yet, knock on wood, and hopefully it doesn't happen. Bike is fortunately locked up in a fairly busy area with security cameras.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  4. #4
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    Nope, I can see it from here.

    Great solution Tenspeed!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
    I'm planning to start using my road bike more to commute. I have to lock my bike outside on a college campus so am wondering if I should swap out the saddle for a cheap $5 one that I don't care about or take the extra effort to lock the saddle with a cable leash.

    If you lock your bike outside, have you had your saddle stolen and/or do you lock your saddle?
    Follow the advice of Ghettocruise; seriously I am not a commuter by any means. I retired from teh Army back in 2004 and decided to just live on my bike instead of going back home to Texas. I have been riding all over Europe since 2004, I pack a ton of gear and a trailer.

    I had my saddle stolen like 10 times before I switched to a torx head. It sure as heck was not because I thought of it either. That was some cat at a bike shop in Berlin I push my rig to. I guess he could see I was pissed and very experienced with this situation. He said that I should do this and that he had some in the back.

    This never happened to me again. I could not understand what sort of person does this crap either; I mean seriously. One day I will catch a person doing this to another persons rig and take out all the times I had mine stolen on them. I am sure my Moonlander could drive right over a saddle thief.
    De oppresso liber

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
    I'm planning to start using my road bike more to commute. I have to lock my bike outside on a college campus so am wondering if I should swap out the saddle for a cheap $5 one that I don't care about or take the extra effort to lock the saddle with a cable leash.

    If you lock your bike outside, have you had your saddle stolen and/or do you lock your saddle?
    Cheap saddle or just take the seat post, seat, tool bag and quick release with you when you leave it.....big tool bag makes a nice murse as well.

  7. #7
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    No but I did just get a sweet new Brooks so I have given it some thought. I saw that chain-in-a-tube solution on bikesnobNYC's blog... looked simple and effective...and made me thankful that I live in the sticks I rarely have to lock up outside, but now I have something new to worry about when I do...
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  8. #8
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    The other idea a friend had, which I post with a bit more hesitancy, was to drop a ball bearing into the HEX bolt head and seal it with solder. It just looked like a round solid bolt.

    Of course, to loosen or tighten the bolt required melting the solder back out and taking out the ball bearing.

    A big hassle, but it cost nothing, was usable-then-removable on higher-end bikes, I'm willing to bet no thief of opportunity could possibly figure that one out.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  9. #9
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    Not solder but glue, epoxy or super glue.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    Not solder but glue, epoxy or super glue.
    I like this idea the most. If I use super glue, what would be the best way to remove it? Acetone or WD40?


    I've heard of the chain lock idea, but seems simple to get at with a chain breaker. Instead, I'd probably use a small cable and padlock and wrap electrical tape around the padlock. It would be less clunky and a cost ~$10

  11. #11
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    No, not without the rest of the bike anyhow.

  12. #12
    I'd rather be on my bike
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    Quote Originally Posted by bank5 View Post
    I like this idea the most. If I use super glue, what would be the best way to remove it? Acetone or WD40?


    I've heard of the chain lock idea, but seems simple to get at with a chain breaker. Instead, I'd probably use a small cable and padlock and wrap electrical tape around the padlock. It would be less clunky and a cost ~$10
    Cable can be cut so easy that I will not use any cable to secure any part of my bike. Friend of mine locked his fat bike to his car rack and his girlfriend somehow had the key when she left for New York. He had used an On Guard cable that was pretty thick by standards. He brought it to my place because we were going riding, and I happen to have some bolt cutters back when I was married and a home owner. One snip and the cable was cut in half. Not even a second. It was 0 effort. He and I looked at each other in total disbelief. It was so easy that I barely felt the cable being cut. Neither of us now have any trust in any cable.

    Now, if you have that chain wrapped in a tube and electrical taped, a thief is going to have to work to get that. They will have to cut the tube enough to get at the chain, and have a chain breaker tool with them. Thieves don't want to have to be slowed down when making a theft. Too much work to get at something especially a saddle, they are usually gonna walk away. Bolt cutters? I would imagine that thieves would have those handy to get at bikes that are only cable locked to a rack.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    Cable can be cut so easy that I will not use any cable to secure any part of my bike. Friend of mine locked his fat bike to his car rack and his girlfriend somehow had the key when she left for New York. He had used an On Guard cable that was pretty thick by standards. He brought it to my place because we were going riding, and I happen to have some bolt cutters back when I was married and a home owner. One snip and the cable was cut in half. Not even a second. It was 0 effort. He and I looked at each other in total disbelief. It was so easy that I barely felt the cable being cut. Neither of us now have any trust in any cable.

    Now, if you have that chain wrapped in a tube and electrical taped, a thief is going to have to work to get that. They will have to cut the tube enough to get at the chain, and have a chain breaker tool with them. Thieves don't want to have to be slowed down when making a theft. Too much work to get at something especially a saddle, they are usually gonna walk away. Bolt cutters? I would imagine that thieves would have those handy to get at bikes that are only cable locked to a rack.
    Yeah, neither the chain or cable is bullet proof, but maybe a combination of the chain + cable + U-lock on the saddle
    With anything security related, I always want to be more secure than most of the people around me while keeping time and hassle within reason.

  14. #14
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    On my commuter, I combine a u-lock with a cable.

    I used to have a Brooks saddle, but it wasn't comfortable so I went with something else. I just have a regular 'ol hex bolt at the clamp.

    I only really lock it up outside if I'm going into a store for a short trip. I have the ability to secure my commuter indoors when I'm working, so I don't need to worry about it being locked up outside for extended periods.

  15. #15
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    Using a torx bolt is a good idea.

    If it is allowed to cost a bit more, maybe a pitlock skewer would be a solution:
    pitlock locking skewers

  16. #16
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    I tried super glue and it works extremely well. It is a pain to get out but is perfect if you don't plan on adjusting your saddle.

  17. #17
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    I say get office or lab space somewhere on the college campus where you can store your bike. I keep mine the lab where I work because it's a big room, nobody uses it but me, and I only take up a little bit of space because I'm doing all computer work at the moment. Added benefit, it's in a restricted access corridor, so not that many people can get in. Best part, when it gets cold, you don't have to sit your but on a cold seat after fiddling with your locks.

    Obviously if you have to keep it outside, I think the highly specific bolt is the way to go, unless you lose the wrench...
    dang

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