Handlebar options

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  • 08-25-2014
    Straz85
    Handlebar options
    Picked up a Nashbar SS CX bike for commuting to compliment my CrossCheck. The website said the ETT on the size I got was 1cm less than my CC, but the overall reach is way more and it bothers my bad shoulder (torn labrum in my right shoulder). I'm going to get a non setback seatpost which will help, and I've thought about a shorter stem and/or compact drop bars. But I figure why not explore other handlebar options. What other types of bars could I use besides drop bars and mountain bike bars? Pictures would be very helpful!
  • 08-25-2014
    TenSpeed
    Bullhorns!!!! I love mine, and they give you plenty of options for hand positions. I know that some people here run woodchippers and midge bars. Not sure how those would work for you.
  • 08-25-2014
    newfangled
    I'm really digging flared dirtdrops.

    A Midge (nice and cheap) set up low is really, surprisingly comfy on the hoods



    Woodchipper (not so cheap) set up nice and high, to spend most my time in the drops
  • 08-25-2014
    Straz85
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    I'm really digging flared dirtdrops.

    A Midge (nice and cheap) set up low is really, surprisingly comfy on the hoods
    Woodchipper (not so cheap) set up nice and high, to spend most my time in the drops

    I've seen these quite a bit, but I'm not even sure how you would hold them. It looks like if you put your hands on the hoods like you would with drop bars, your wrist would be awkwardly angled..?
  • 08-25-2014
    newfangled
    ^ I've had the midge for about a year, and originally had them on my 29er setup so that I used them in the drops. On that bike I'd occasionally try the hoods, and think "This is weird."

    But a few months ago I moved them over to the 26er where they were naturally much lower, and I was really pleased. Your wrists are at an angle, but it's that "natural" angle that happens if you just hold your arm straight out. All I can say is that I'm surprised how comfy they are, and that I've done a few 50mi rides on the hoods/ramps/top with no issues.


    shiggy's Mt Bike Tire Site - Why I Use Dropbars - THE bike tire information resource

    I wouldn't say they're perfect, but they're fun if you're feeling adventurous, and they look cool.
  • 08-26-2014
    Straz85
    Thanks for the info! I just ordered a set of Midge bars! Should be interesting to try. I'm pretty confident I'll like them.

    I tried to rep you but I have to spread it around.....
  • 08-26-2014
    newfangled
    1 Attachment(s)
    Hope you like it. When you get it, there are a million different ways to set it up.

    In the first picture I posted, the hoods are pretty close to level. But here I've got the hoods at almost 45deg


    And here's someone's more "typical" setup with the tops almost level, and the hoods inline with them:
    Attachment 918638

    Midge Bar Image Search
  • 08-26-2014
    jrm
    Your frames geometry is going to factor into whether or not you get the bar positioned so that you can use all the hand positions the bar has to offer. I could never get the bar high enough.
  • 08-26-2014
    BrianMc
  • 08-26-2014
    Saul Lumikko
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Straz85 View Post
    I'm going to get a non setback seatpost which will help

    You might find that putting the saddle forward increases weight on your arms and could be even worse for your shoulder. Counter-intuitive as it may seem, often moving the saddle a little bit back helps if you feel that the bar is too far forward and difficult to reach. Give it a try, changing the settings doesn't cost you anything but effort.

    (How do I know? I have a short back and used to think I need in-line seatposts and short stems. I was wrong.)
  • 08-26-2014
    Straz85
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Saul Lumikko View Post
    You might find that putting the saddle forward increases weight on your arms and could be even worse for your shoulder. Counter-intuitive as it may seem, often moving the saddle a little bit back helps if you feel that the bar is too far forward and difficult to reach. Give it a try, changing the settings doesn't cost you anything but effort.

    (How do I know? I have a short back and used to think I need in-line seatposts and short stems. I was wrong.)

    I have tried both offset and zero-offset seatposts on multiple bikes and the zero-offset has always worked best for me. Though this is the first time my shoulder has been bothered. I did order a zero-offset seatpost, I will give both a try once I get the shorter stem and new handlebars on there and see which one works best. I appreciate the tip!
  • 08-27-2014
    jl
    My commuter only bike does not have drop bars. Here are some good choices for some more traditional swept back commuter bars.

    Handlebars - Components

    Handlebars | SOMA Fabrications

    https://www.rivbike.com/Nitto-Handlebars-s/107.htm

    Universal Cycles -- Handlebars & Upgrades > Multi Position Bars
  • 08-27-2014
    rogbie
    One thing to keep in mind: New components may put you in a better riding position, but if your posture is incorrect pain is imminent.

    Sheldon Brown has some simple insights into this matter: Bicycling and Pain
  • 08-28-2014
    Straz85
    Just found out the Midge bars are on back order. Planet X is supposed to ship orders the same day according to their website and after 3 days I didn't have a tracking number, so I emailed them and they said they're on back order for another week. The website doesn't say they're out of stock. I asked if they will expedite shipping since the website wasn't updated properly, hopefully they will!