GT Transeo commuter build- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    GT Transeo commuter build

    Just picked up this frame from Nashbar and want to build a commuter bike. I'm planning disc brakes,carbon fork,700c wheels,& 2-9 drivetrain. I'm new to building and have a few questions.
    1. Mountain bike running gear or road bike components?
    2.what is ment by 135mm wheel spacing? Im watching a couple cyclocross wheel sets on ebay and dont want to make a mistake by buying the wrong wheels. The Transeo is made for 700c. I want to run disc brakes because I have a set laying in the parts bin.



  2. #2
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    Looks like a nice frame.

    135mm spacing is basically the width of the rear hub, and your frame needs to match that.

    Nashbar says the Transeo has 130mm spacing, which is a pretty typical for roadbikes. 135mm is more typical for mountainbikes.

    Bicycle Frame/Hub Spacing
    (In that Sheldon Brown article he talks a bit about spreading the frame - you don't want to do that, because your frame is aluminum.)

    Basically, you need a rear wheel with 130mm spacing.

    oops, and I just saw your other thread: http://forums.mtbr.com/wheels-tires/...et-804798.html

  3. #3
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    Sounds like a nice build.

    My $0.02 on your questions:

    1. Depends on your local terrain, but if the bike is only going to be used to commute on the road, I would say go with a road drive train.

    2. 135mm is the width of the rear triangle where the hub of the wheel goes and 135 I believe is more of a mountain bike spacing and I think 130mm is road. Be careful when selecting a CX wheel set as I believe a lot of them run 130mm. I think you should be able to run any 29er wheel set as a 700c wheel.

    That's all I've got, I am sure others will chime in.

    *edit* looks like newfangled beat me to it! lol
    "I have one speed. I have one gear: Go." -- Charlie Sheen

  4. #4
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    Thanks for he help fellas... Yes this will be road only.

  5. #5
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    1. For a road-going bike, gear a bit higher and go with a tighter-ratio cassette. What's your plan for the handle bars? That's going to have some influence on both what's compatible and what gear range is more reasonable. Also, give a little thought to the landscape where you are, and whether or not you'll be carrying loads. Some pretty high ratios are okay for me when I'm not carrying anything, but if I have to climb a hill with laden panniers, low gears are awesome.

    2. Find out what spacing your actual bike actually has. If it's 130mm, the Velocity road disc set is probably your best bet for a correct fit. Or, get something built on the White Industries MI6-CX hub. I decided both were too expensive and crammed a MTB hub in my road disc bike. Ask me in five or ten years if it's still okay. If you do MTB hubs, any 29er wheelset also works.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  6. #6
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    Doubt I'll be carrying anything other than a camel back. Im leaning toward a close ratio cassette. I live in Western North Carolina (Asheville) and hills are the norm. I'm using mostly as a trainer for the road. Bike may never see dirt. I have 2 Mtn bikes. Im watching a set of wheels you speak of on ebay.This bike will have carbon Mtn bike bars.

  7. #7
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Since you're doing flat bars, I doubt that the last couple high ratios on a road drivetrain are going to be of a lot of use. Also, not that useful for commuting.

    So do MTB shifters and front derailleur, especially if you can find one of the 9-speed double FDs. Road rear derailleur will probably have the capacity for a MTB double crank and will shift a little better on a close-ratio cassette, although I doubt the difference would be huge.

    For the crank, either get one of the new high-geared MTB doubles or get a road compact and a 44 or 46 tooth large chainring. If you want a road compact, something sold for cyclocross would come out of the box about right.

    For actual training rides, think about a road bike. Especially since you haven't bolted any money to this frame yet.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  8. #8
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    Don't want a road bike.... Hence flat bars. Just a 10-15 mile training bike and to ride to work. I'm old......lol
    What's a 9sp double FD?
    Can you mix and match brands when it comes to derailleurs and shifters?
    Ex. SRAM shifters and shimano 105 rear dérailleur?
    I've thought about gearing and components same as a cyclocross bike.

  9. #9
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Nobody's holding a gun to your head and making you put road bars down low like something from slamthatstem.com. I was suggesting it because as a result of enjoying my early 20s, my shoulder's not what it could be and riding 10-15 miles of pavement on flat bars is murder. I imagine I'll feel that way more and more as I age. That aside,

    A 9-speed double FD is a front derailleur for a double crank and that goes in a 9-speed drivetrain. That's most 9-speed road front derailleurs and I think that there were Saint and SLX models too. Shouldn't be too hard to find.

    MTB front derailleurs aren't "supposed" to work with road front shifters and vice versa for Shimano. I think SRAM doesn't care. Road flat bar shifters aren't very common, so you'll be paying close to MSRP. This matters for Shimano. For SRAM, if I'm not confusing myself, you could just do the MTB shifters and road front derailleur if that's what you wanted. Fact-check me before trying this.

    SRAM and Shimano rear derailleurs and shifters are not cross-compatible. 10-speed in either isn't cross-compatible with other stuff. Front derailleurs are cross-compatible in mountain components, but I'm not sure how it all plays together in the road ecosystems. Easier just to stay on-brand.

    Cyclocross bikes are just as variable as road bikes in general about gearing. I have a 34t and 46t chainring on mine. I'll have to see how that works in races, but it seems good for mixed-surface so far. Frankly, I doubt I could ever spin out 44/11, so I think that a MTB double crank is already plenty high. It's not like you're doing sprint finishes here - you ought to be able to hit 37.5 mph on a 44/11, with skinny road tires. Already a totally impractical speed to pedal to outside of competition. Which means that whether you do a road compact crank, like on a lot of 'cross bikes, or a high-geared MTB double crank, you should be fine for top end. For this season, I'm trying a 11-32 cassette and MTB rear derailleur. I'm not sure yet if the 32t cog is going to be my secret weapon at muddy races, or superfluous. It was nice to have some super-low gears when I rode the bike to an appointment on the top of a hill the other day, though. I could have attacked the climb... but I didn't have to. I have a plain Deore non-Shadow rear derailleur. Supposedly it will work better with road cassettes if I use the bike in that role.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  10. #10
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    Andrew,Thank You sooo much! I've learned alot from you posts! I did pick up a barely used Trek 7.5 today. It has a small frame,which is useless to me,I'm 6'3". However,all parts will cross over to my new frame. Got this bike for about the price of a new set of Velocity wheels...... This was a huge score..... Botranger wheels,avid bb5s,Ultegra rd, aliveo fd,& Botranger seat/stem.



  11. #11
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    Score!

    You might even get a few bucks back out of the frame when you're done.

    This is a much better way to go about building the bike, if you're not "curating" every single part. And it should loosen up your budget a little bit if there are a few choice parts here or there that you want to do differently.

    Come to think of it - BB7s are a lot nicer than 5s. Do the rotors too while you're at it, if you decide you want to swap the brakes out.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  12. #12
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    The tires still have the nipples..... No dirt/grease on cassette. This way I can get started and make changes later. Already have the frame sold!

  13. #13
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    I use BB7's on my commuter with centerlock rotors even though you aren't supposed to because of brake track differences. I just have to keep a very close eye on pad wear and replace a bit sooner. I am strongly considering moving to a flat bar so I can move to Shimano hydros for better caliper fitment on my frame and so I can stop watching the pad wear pattern. Avid's centerlock rotors cost almost twice that of Shimano's. Otherwise I'd deal with the fitment.

    I use a mtb hub laced to Velocity Dyad rims. A bit heavier duty than minimally necessary, but the extra durability lets me beat on it a little and take it offroad.

    I am also considering going to a 1x9 or 1x10 drivetrain for better hill gearing. I'd use a mtb cassette to give me a bit of range without too many extra parts.
    I live in a mostly flat area but do run into the occasional hill. Sometimes I am in the mood to attack it in the current SS gearing I use but sometimes not.

    Have fun with this build.

  14. #14
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    Done! Thanks for everyone's help!
    I'm planning adding some carbon parts: fork,bars,& stem.


  15. #15
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    Looks good! I bet that thing flies
    "Never mistake motion for action."

    "If I can bicycle, I bicycle."

  16. #16
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    Yes it does!

  17. #17
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    Scored a slightly used Shimano 105 rd for $30

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