Good deal?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Good deal?

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    103

    Good deal?

    I have done alot of research on mountain bikes, but I don't know a whole lot about road bikes. I am 6'3, and want a decent bike to commute with this summer while living in the city, as well as something to ride around campus with when I go back to school. I found this ad on Craigslist:

    http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/bik/1228050669.html

    It's a single speed, but there are no tremendous hills where I live, and alot of people seem to really like singlespeed bikes. What do you guys think? Based off online sizing charts, 60 cm seems to be about the size bike I need. Is this a fair price? Thanks for any help you can offer!

  2. #2
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    18,453
    My commute bike has a 2x6 drivetrain and cost $95. I don't know my track frames, but $300 seems like a lot. The brake's also in a really odd place - a lot of fixed-gear riders use a front brake, but I don't know if I've ever seen a fixed-gear set up with a rear brake only. It's unnecessary on that type of drivetrain, and if you ride mountain bikes you know how much less useful the rear brake is than the front.

    My New York commuter was a cheap 10-speed I converted to a singlespeed. It wasn't fixed, though. Singlespeeds can be pretty nice for city riding because it allows you to have a very lightweight bike with fewer moving parts to break or get stolen, and the acceleration can feel a little more immediate.

    Do you want a bike to use as a practical commuter, or a status symbol? $300 also seems like a lot to leave locked outside. Utility bikes are subject to vandalism, carelessness and theft. I like mine to be worth about a day's pay.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  3. #3
    No-Brakes Cougar
    Reputation: Gary the No-Trash Cougar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,143
    That's a bit steep for a used mid-range track bike with apparently stock components and an impractical brake set-up. For a campus beater I'd shop around for something more reasonable.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: harpdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    56
    Does fixed gear mean the pedals ALWAYS move? You might not like that.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    103
    Yea, I'm leaning away from this bike now; I talked to the guy, and he said that the bike cannot be converted to run gears, and that most fixed bikes can't be. My original plan was to spend $150-200 on a geared steel road bike, I figured I could get something halfway decent built in the 1990's or so for that kind of money. Problem is, looking for an XL bike limits my options. I have been scouring Craigslist, and other local websites, with limited luck. And no, I am definitely not buying a bike to be a status symbol! Haha I would have to upgrade my POS car first to gain any higher status.

    The bikes I have been finding in that price range are mostly Schwinns and Raleighs from the 1970's. Maybe its just my lack of road bike knowledge, but $200 seems awfully steep for a 35-year old bike. I guess I just have to be patient....

  6. #6
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    18,453
    How attached to gears are you? All of my present bikes have them, so I'm hardly one to say that they're an unnecessary complication or something, However, they do increase both purchase and maintenance costs significantly. It's also easy to convert most fixies into singlespeeds that coast - depending on the hub threading, you may only need to replace the track cog with a BMX driver, and add brakes if the previous owner was too cool to have them.

    BMX drivers can run under $10. On a fixed-gear with brakes and a flip-flop hub or converted road hub, that's all you need. If it doesn't have brakes, you need levers, brakes and cable runs, and it becomes an expensive conversion, unless you've got a good used-parts bin available to you.

    How about these?

    http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/bik/1229659691.html

    http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/bik/1229385481.html

    http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/bik/1229155033.html

    If everything's working, don't let the age bother you. Just don't replace anything that's not broken because sourcing parts will be annoying.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  7. #7
    No-Brakes Cougar
    Reputation: Gary the No-Trash Cougar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,143
    Quote Originally Posted by Lukem
    The bikes I have been finding in that price range are mostly Schwinns and Raleighs from the 1970's. Maybe its just my lack of road bike knowledge, but $200 seems awfully steep for a 35-year old bike. I guess I just have to be patient....
    That's not entirely unreasonable for a vintage road bike. Is it free of rust and damage? Are most or all of the parts in working order? Is it somewhat rare? Lugged frame? Another issue too is that hipster have created demand for vintage road bikes with horizontal drop-outs so that has driven the price up. But while it may a nice bike, do you still want to commute on it? Maybe you're better off with a beater after all? Or a Wallyworld bike?
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by Gary the No-Trash Cougar
    That's not entirely unreasonable for a vintage road bike. Is it free of rust and damage? Are most or all of the parts in working order? Is it somewhat rare? Lugged frame? Another issue too is that hipster have created demand for vintage road bikes with horizontal drop-outs so that has driven the price up. But while it may a nice bike, do you still want to commute on it? Maybe you're better off with a beater after all? Or a Wallyworld bike?
    Why are people looking for bikes with horizontal dropouts? Are those bikes better candidates to convert to singlespeed? I probably won't buy a Wallybike; I guess the riding I would be doing is commuting, as well as recreational road riding on the weekends (ride length: 1-2 hours or so). The idea I had was to buy an older road bike for $150 or so, something not flashy enough to get stolen but still rideable enough to be fun on the weekends. A steel bike is appealing to me because of it should offer decent ride quality, it seems to be common on older bikes, and I'm not really concerned about weight. I'm not really thinking about getting a singlespeed now because of the longer weekend rides...

    AndrwSwitch, thanks for posting those CL links...all three of those posted after I went to work this morning. I will probably check out the second one tonight or tomorrow morning. $100 for a bike with all the accessories seems pretty good to me....hopefully the bike fits.

  9. #9
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    18,453
    Quote Originally Posted by Lukem
    Why are people looking for bikes with horizontal dropouts? Are those bikes better candidates to convert to singlespeed?
    Yes.

    An road bike with horizontal dropouts and an older threaded hub can be converted to a non-fixed singlespeed for under $10, with a BMX driver and by shortening the chain.

    They can also be converted to fixed with a new hub (better) or by putting a track cog on the existing wheel and praying. My skinny jeans wearing, white belted friends tell me that plain road hubs and quick releases are both very bad ideas on fixed-gears, but horizontal dropouts combined with a track hub with nutted axles aren't necessarily bad, although they still have the potential for a nasty failure that track ends avoid. Ultimately if the goal of the bike is to have brightly colored deep-Vs and you generally just walk it places and then leave it locked outside so that your friends recognize your bike as they walk by with theirs and know it's a cool bar, reliability is not an issue.

    Ironically, the root of the fixed-gear fad is bike messengers, and they've commented in the past that they started riding track bikes because nobody wanted a frame that wouldn't accept a geared drivetrain and it made used track frames very, very cheap. Now track bikes are really expensive and old ten speeds with horizontal dropouts are also expensive, and it's because they can accept singlespeed drivetrains.

    If you're doing some recreational riding, a wallybike's probably going to piss you off. An older road bike, if you maintain it, ought to be fine though, as long as it fits and it wasn't a wallybike when it was sold.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.