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  1. #1
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    gloves and rain!

    What gloves are you wearing on cold rainy days? Temps from 45 to 65F?

    I've been searching for waterproof gloves and have only been finding gloves that appear to be perfect for temps less than 45F.

    Thanks in advance.
    Charlie

  2. #2
    Bedwards Of The West
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    When it's as warm as 45, I don't worry about the gloves being waterproof. I wear a rain jacket, and my pearl izumi 'windstopper' gloves. They get a little wet, but I dry them out at work or at home, and they're good to go for the next round. The windstopper feature keeps the wind from making them cold when they're wet. They would be miserable hot above 50 or so. For a rainy day anywhere near the 60* range, I'd just wear my summer gloves since they'll dry faster. In my area, a 'cold' rainy day is right around the freezing mark, and I don't go to the 'lobster' gloves until 25 or so. Ironically, the lobsters are pretty waterproof, but they don't have to be since they only see the snow, which just bounces off.
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  3. #3
    CB of the East
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    I bought a pair of Glacier Gloves last fall for cold rainy days. They are very waterproof and not all that insulating. I've only got a chance to wear them once so I can't give an in depth review. The biggest problem is getting them dry on the inside after you wear them because any sweat gets trapped in them since they don't breath.

  4. #4
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    Rubberized bar-mitts below 5C.

    Warmer than that and I just bring an extra pair of gloves for the ride home.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  5. #5
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    Yeah 45 -65 is nice weather here... I have ridden in 20 degree with my winter gloves without problems. Anything in your range I am just wearing my mtb'ing gloves.

  6. #6
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    I have an entire glove system I use:

    base layer: silk liners (like from Tourmaster)
    next layer: military surplus polypropylene liners
    next layer: military surplus wool gloves
    final layer: motorcycle rubber overgloves

    I only use the final layer if it is pouring out, or very cold and windy

    sometimes I use surgical gloves as another layer between the silk and the polypro if it is pouring down rain or very cold and windy and I don't have the motorcycle rubber overgloves with me.

    The silk gloves aren't very durable, especially if you have anything velcro you need to manipulate while you have them on. I'm considering deleting them.

    For the upper range of the temperatures the OP is looking at I'd just use the wool gloves over the polypros. The wool does a nice job of blocking some of the wind, even after it is wet.

    Having everything as layers helps with the drying process, and the military surplus gloves are dirt cheap and durable.

  7. #7
    CB of the East
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    ^Holy crap, that's a lot of layers to put on. I bet it's warm and dry but I find 2 layers to be a pain.

    OK, I wore the Glacier Gloves so today so I could report back. There was a very heavy mist/light rain at 38 degrees this morning. I have a 12 mile , about 45 min commute. At the end of the ride my hands were dry aside from some sweat and a little cold. My hands run cold on rides anyway. I'd probably add a liner for these temps. It's still hard to get the perspiration dried out after a ride. That's my only complaint. But if you want a glove that will give you full protection from wind and water, these will do it at the temps you are asking about.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails gloves and rain!-2012-03-14-07.48.07.jpg  

    Last edited by bedwards1000; 03-14-2012 at 07:07 AM. Reason: Added Picture

  8. #8
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    Check out Sealskinz. They're working nicely on rainy (every) day in the PNW.

  9. #9
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    I really like these gore gloves

    I got a pair under $40 but they are really the only pair of nice biking gloves I've ever tried that work so I would pay more.

    The way it works for me is I stay w/ crocheted fingerless gloves down into the 40s as fall progresses but once I switch to the full-finger gloves they pretty much stay on until it's back up into the 60d, which is like July.

  10. #10
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    I use Mountain Hardwear "Epic", which is basically a shell with a thin flannel layer. They are intended for cross country skiing or snowshoeing and wamer temps. I still can't stand wearing them above 60F though. At that point any gloves I wear will become wet from the inside out, so I just forget about it. The gloves are great all the way down to the high teens, or lower with a liner.

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  11. #11
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    Pearl Izumi's Cyclone gloves are just right for that job.

    Posted w/ Tapatalk via Android

  12. #12
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    resolved?

    I think I have resolved my rain and glove concerns for cold rainy days. At Target I bought a size XL gel glove for $15, and pulled them over my size large NRS hydroskin river gloves. Comfortable fit!

    The NRS gloves are .5 mm neoprene with a tacky coating. I use the gloves in kayaking in Spring snowmelt water, with pogies, and my hands stay warm. The gloves are thin enough to not loose the road feel through the bars and tacky enough in rain to shift and brake.

    I don't know if the gloves are water proof, but that doesn't matter, while kayaking my hands stay warm and wet in the coldest of water, (with pogies). I think this may work down to 40F. If it happens, I'll post the results.

    nrs hydroskin gloves. NRS Men's HydroSkin Gloves at NRSweb.com

  13. #13
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    37F and rain,

    37F and rain, 15-20 mph headwind.
    This glove combination kept my hands toasty during this cold rainy morning. First 3 miles I felt a slight chill, then warmth. The ride is 13 miles, rained the whole way. Very excited how this is working out. Rain is the key factor. If it is not raining, other gloves will be more comfortable.

    This combination may work down to 32F (or lower) and rain. If it snows, the gore windshells may be warmer.

  14. #14
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    Endura Deluge Gloves

    Deluge Gloves

    Not super insulated, but 65 would be a little warm. I would say 45-55 would be fine

  15. #15
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    Havn't seen a cure for my problem yet....

    When I ride in the rain I have lots of gloves that work anywhere from okay to great...

    But if I am out in the rain for a while...the water starts to soak down my sleeves, and fills the gloves with water...then my hands get cold...well unless the rain is warm...

    I have tried jackets from water tight rain gear to light breathable gortex.. no luck.

  16. #16
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    try the NRS gloves

    While kayaking my hands are soaked, in WARM water. The thin neoprene eliminates evaporative cooling and insulates very well. My hands were dry today, I kept my sleeves loose to allow air flow and the allow the sleeves to cover my gloves/wrist. No rain soaked in, I was riding over an hour.

  17. #17
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    SealSkinz, the Brits know about rainy conditions

    SealSkinz, Waterproof, Breathable, Closefitting

  18. #18
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    I use my NRS neoprene gloves as well...can't remember what model they are. Good stuff for the cold and wet! Pretty durable too!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjohnson View Post
    While kayaking my hands are soaked, in WARM water. The thin neoprene eliminates evaporative cooling and insulates very well. My hands were dry today, I kept my sleeves loose to allow air flow and the allow the sleeves to cover my gloves/wrist. No rain soaked in, I was riding over an hour.
    I have a set of kayaking neoprene gloves.....my hands got cold.

    The cold rain/snow either soaks through the breathable fabric then pools in the gloves and gets even colder...

    Or the sweat condenses inside the sleeves and trickles down into the gloves where it gets cold...

    Oh it is fine going up-hill, but downhill when you are not working nearly has hard is the problem.

  20. #20
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    I picked up a pair of Outdoor Research Versaliner gloves at REI at the beginning of the Alaska winter. I've used the poly glove under my expedition gloves, the outer liner as a vapor barrier under the same expedition gloves and have been toasty down to -20. I use the poly liner and over glove in temps from the mid single digits to the mid teens, just the poly liner from the mid teens to mid twenties, and use the over glove when it is rainy or snowy and wet. Case in point, wore the over glove over my Fox Digit vented gloves in a mid thirties snow rain mix ride today and was dry and comfy.

    When I first picked these gloves up, I figured they would maybe last half the winter. The overglove seems really flimsy. But narry a fray on them or the liner. Wish I could say the same for my Grandoe expedition gloves - wore a hole through the leather of both thumbs from shifting within one season of riding.

    It seems that REI does not have them right now.
    Cheers

  21. #21
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    A lot of great info here. Thanks everyone.

  22. #22
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    These bad boys get the nod from me.
    Amazon.com: Gore Men's Mistral Gloves: Clothing
    They work awesome in that temp range rain or shine.
    They are thin but I have worn them down to 30 degrees and only start to get a little uncomfortable after about 25 to 30 minutes.

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