drive what you want, just commute more- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 51 of 51
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    58

    drive what you want, just commute more

    I drive a V8 truck and love it. I will never give up the power and utility of a large SUV or truck, even with the poor gas mileage and high prices. All I need to do is commute/run errands by bike more. With gas prices as high as they are, I find saving money enough motivation. Of course I would save a lot more money if I bought a four banger car, but I would probably die a horrible death by the hands of a SuperDuty.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    8,252
    Nice justification. Seems that you aren't "commuting" more yet - let us know how that works out for you!

    And you might/not save $ by buying another car- there are many factors (depreciation, interest, resale etc) that determine financial viability.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SteveF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    2,335
    I personally think that driving fewer miles and keeping your vehicle longer are about as environmentally responsible as driving a more economical car more miles and replacing it more often. The cost of building and then disposing of a vehicle of any size is not insignificant.

    So I see where you're coming from, MTB416. But. Please remember that a big, heavy square-nosed vehicle is more dangerous to other people, be they in smaller cars, or peds or cyclists, and drive accordingly. Share the road and don't use your big truck to bully others.

    I happen to prefer smaller vehicles myself. I like the way they handle and I appreciate their efficiency. Easy to park, easy to wash, cheap to operate. I also only drive around 4000 miles a year, buy used, and keep my cars for at least a decade. I think these things help as much or more than a few extra MPG's...

    My two cents...

  4. #4
    Outrageously happy
    Reputation: Roeland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    71
    Our household is carefully going through a transition. There are four drivers with four cars. Although my background is in tech, I ran a construction company for three years. Fun, but I'm going back into a tech start-up, which is currently "virtual." No office, so I work from home. I drive a Toyota Tacoma V6 long bed and would purchase about 75 gallons / month. My wife is an exec at a tech company. She drives a Saab and purchases about 30 gallons / month. My daughter goes to college in San Diego, but spends her summers with us in the Bay Area. She drives a Ford Escape 4WD and purchases 50 gallons / month. My son goes to high school, drives a Civic Hybrid manual and purchases 10 gallons / month. That is the "before" picture, where we use 165 gallons / month.

    We don't really want to purchase new vehicles and we all really enjoy the vehicles we have. But we want to reduce pollution, congestion and expenses. So,...

    I'm selling my truck. I still have it, and with biking to run personal and professional errands, I've reduced my gas consumption to 30 gallons / month. But I want my Civic back! With the proceeds from the truck sale, I will buy my son a Vespa and my daughter a Civic Hybrid with automatic. We keep the Ford Escape for camping, skiing, surfing, moving, trips to hardware store. My wi'fe's Saab is untouchable, but she is committing to bike commuting 2X per week during the daylight savings portion of the year. My son is making the same commitment. This will reduce their driving by about 10%. So new calcs, we would use 20 + 27 + 20 + 5 = 72 gallons. Add 10 / month for the Ford Escape for a total 82 gallons / month.

    Cut it in half! Trade only one vehicle, and we still have the utility vehicle. Helps that I changed jobs, too. The transition should be completed by early summer.

  5. #5

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    13
    you rock roeland!

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    39
    [QUOTE=Roeland] My wi'fe's Saab is untouchable,QUOTE]

    "There's right and there's right and never the twain shall meet" H.I. McDonnough

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SteveF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    2,335
    Quote Originally Posted by templar
    you rock roeland!

    Yeah, that's just the sort of clear headed analysis of need vs want that will get more Americans driving less and driving smarter. Nice work!

    And yay for the Heinlein quote! B-)

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,182
    We paid a premium to be 1.8 miles from my wife's job and walk or bike distance for k-12 for the kids. It appears those who laughed at us for not getting a plastic covered box with 3 stall garage on a recent farm field are getting laughed at now because our neighborhood value has gone up in the bad market and we're driving very little.

    The only downside is a larger garage would be nice for 5 people's worth of bike, sports & gardening stuff and the home is natural cedar and stone so I have maintenance that the plastic siding on new homes would not have.

    That said there are still people who drive a few hundred feet to the school bus stops and some find I'm strange to take my twins (4 y.o.) to preschool via Burley.

    My business requires about 2600-4000 miles of driving a year and at current rate we're driving about 12000 miles a year for both cars. It might go up a bit this year if I can get some bike and camping trips done. I think most people drive 12k for car so I'm not feeling too guilty.

    I encourage young people to save money because we had to do it a long time to get the nice home in nice location and it's a wonderful luxury worth the effort.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    347
    yeah I agree with the OP.

    Although I don't currently drive a v8, my next car might be an old 80's big american sedan because I like them. My wife and I currently drive a 4cyl 96 tacoma and a 4cyl 91 accord about 15K miles combined a year. If I get an old v8, I'll just drive it less, that's all. I'm not going to feel guilty; I have no interest in hybrids or anything else that is too complicated that I can't work on myself in the driveway.

  10. #10

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    13
    actualy alot of those old cars had decent highway mileage due to good gearing and ...
    many of themn where lighter than ther current versions due to a lack of computers leatther tvs and bluetooth coffe enima machines...

  11. #11
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    Quote Originally Posted by templar
    actualy alot of those old cars had decent highway mileage due to good gearing and ...
    many of themn where lighter than ther current versions due to a lack of computers leatther tvs and bluetooth coffe enima machines...
    I had a (95?) Neon for a while. Didn`t really like it (which is why I don`t have it anymore), but it got over 40 MPG. That was in my own usage, not the number that Dodge and EPA pulled out of a hat. I think the "Smart" car claims 40 MPG now. Big whoop- 13 years more technology and chop the car in half, it had better get a lot better mileage than that to be a hit with me. In addition to the bluetooth enima machines, newer cars have been loaded down with energy absorbing bumpers, airbags, etc and the power shared with daytime running lights. It`s the crazy saftey regs that kill the fuel efficiency. In all fairness, I think the newer cars actually produce less contamination even though more fuel goes in. Still, I`m not particularly impressed with them.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    685
    I drive a 97 nissan sentra and last fillup I got 40mpg, including 2 (of 12) gallons of city driving. Amazing how it gets one of the highest mpg marks of all vehicles on the road, yet it was made when gas was $1.24 a gallon. Now that gas is triple that, 40 mpg with no back seats and no trunk (that's you, Smart car) is the most amazing thing since birth control.

  13. #13

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    13
    hooray progress!

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    58

    drive what you want, just commute more

    Quote Originally Posted by CharacterZero
    Nice justification. Seems that you aren't "commuting" more yet - let us know how that works out for you!
    You say "justification" as if I am trying to make myself feel better about driving a V8, I do not feel at all bad about it. If I drive less miles than another person with a high MPG car and we end up even on gas am I not conserving just as much? As for you comment on my not commuting enough, none of us commute enough by bike and I will surely increase my mileage.

    I never bully anyone with my truck. It is not lifted and is 2wd. I roll up to lights so slow people pass me, then accelerate in the same manner. I drive as efficient as you can considering the V8 engine. I have friends who drive V6 cars that achieve poorer gas mileage than I do because they drive them like they stole it. I could care less what your car's rating is for MPG in the city, the only thing that matters for efficient urban driving is your driving behavior. Very rarely does my truck even pass 1800 rpms.

    As for hybrids, they are still too expensive. Not to mention that many firefighters are weary of cutting one open with the Jaws of Life. Precious moments that could save your life are sometimes used to determine a safe way to cut out an occupant. Neither the occupant nor the Firefighter want to be electrocuted. One 12v car battery is more than enough to kill someone, let alone a bank of ten of them. Before you say I'm making this up I have read many articles about this subject and the concern of rescue personnel.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    58
    Originally Posted by CharacterZero
    Nice justification. Seems that you aren't "commuting" more yet - let us know how that works out for you!

    You say "justification" as if I am trying to make myself feel better about driving a V8, I do not feel at all bad about it. If I drive less miles than another person with a high MPG car and we end up even on gas am I not conserving just as much? As for you comment on my not commuting enough, none of us commute enough by bike and I will surely increase my mileage.

    I never bully anyone with my truck. It is not lifted and is 2wd. I roll up to lights so slow people pass me, then accelerate in the same manner. I drive as efficient as you can considering the V8 engine. I have friends who drive V6 cars that achieve poorer gas mileage than I do because they drive them like they stole it. I could care less what your car's rating is for MPG in the city, the only thing that matters for efficient urban driving is your driving behavior. Very rarely does my truck even pass 1800 rpms.

    As for hybrids, they are still too expensive. Not to mention that many firefighters are weary of cutting one open with the Jaws of Life. Precious moments that could save your life are sometimes used to determine a safe way to cut out an occupant. Neither the occupant nor the Firefighter want to be electrocuted. One 12v car battery is more than enough to kill someone, let alone a bank of ten of them. Before you say I'm making this up I have read many articles about this subject and the concern of rescue personnel.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    820
    I live across the street from work. I put less than 3k a year on my 04 4 cylinder Tacoma, and less than 5k a year on my wife's 04 Corolla, which even as a non hybrid, gets 42mpg on the highway. So that's lower consumption and pollution than somebody with a Prius who drives 12-15k a year. I feel sorry for 'bedroom community' dwellers; when gas hits $10.00 gallon, we're all gonna be real sorry we short sightedly demolished so many self contained neighborhoods, and our railway system, in the 40's to the 50's, to clear the way for suburbs and the Gahdamned automobile.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nocturnus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    569
    I commuted to work for a little while, then moved out to an area that there is no way in hell i'd commute on. No way to avid the road in question. I drive a '05 Chevy Classic (fleet Malibu) and get decent MPG. I had a nicely modified '96 Firebird Formula, but ended up selling that a while back when gas prices were still kinda low for a better MPG car. Bad decision there.

  18. #18
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,589
    keep driving big trucks, just make them diesel and convert them to run on spent veggie oil. free fuel, burns cleaner, truck runs just as well as before. win-win. except that all your redneck friends might call you a hippy...

  19. #19
    MTB Addict
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    830
    At some point (when money allows), I'll take a Jeep and throw a diesel in it, then I can have a big, useable vehicle, but still get 30+ mpg and the ability to run on biodiesel.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    88
    I may be wrong, but the majority of the posts just seem to be basic attempts to justify owning an environmentally unfriendly vehicle by commuting by bicycle to maintain a loosely 'carbon-neutral' lifestyle.

    "I don't need to own an environmentally friendly vehicle because I ride my bicycle."

    If that's your viewpoint you've missed the entire point of living a greener life. What's wrong with commuting by bicycle AND owning a vehicle which is also friendly to the environment.

    You probably know, though you may disagree, that a large V8 truck, considered by the industry as a commercial vehicle and therefore not held to the same safety standards as a passenger vehicle, won't help you survive a crash that you could have avoided in the first place by driving something that doesn't come with milk bottle-top brakes and a tendancy to roll over when swerving to avoid a collision.

    Yeah, I know you don't need to live in an underground Hobbit home, drinking your own toilet water and collecting sunlight in bottles! BUT, I wouldn't want someone who is trying to justify the purchase of a large car or truck to read the original post in this thread, and those that follow, and then feel justified in buying a big truck.

    Oh and just because a firefighter would take longer cutting your out of a hybrid vehicle does not mean you have to do the opposite and buy a pick-up truck. There are actually vehicle that fill the gap between a poorly designed Japanese Hybrid car and a vehicle designed for hauling large cargo loads.

    I don't own a car. But I only live six miles from work and might not fully understand the problems faced by some of those in this thread.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: megafrenzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by mtb416
    Of course I would save a lot more money if I bought a four banger car, but I would probably die a horrible death by the hands of a SuperDuty.
    Why is that? Are you a bad driver? Are SuperDutys out to get you?

    When you talk about probabilities, can you back it up with statistics?

    Biggest engine I've owned is a 2.0L 4 banger, yet after driving for over 20 years, guess what, still alive. No horrible death by the hands of a SuperDuty. Just wondering what makes your situation so different.

    What about on your bike, no chance of getting hit by a SuperDuty?

  22. #22
    Outrageously happy
    Reputation: Roeland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach
    keep driving big trucks, just make them diesel and convert them to run on spent veggie oil. free fuel, burns cleaner, truck runs just as well as before. win-win. except that all your redneck friends might call you a hippy...
    that's what I live for! if my redneck friends call me hippy, I have an excuse not to bath for a week, play hackey-sack, join a drum circle, burn a chiller....

  23. #23
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    Hippies- cool. So, if we were to convert my wife`s Saturn to biodeisel, would that make her hippy enough to stop shaving her legs? If she did that, maybe I`d take to pedaling more and start shaving mine. Win-win. The same number of disposeable BICs to the landfill but evberybody just a little bit weirder and a little bit happier!

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    58
    I feel completely unsafe in a car of that size, this is just an opinion. As for statistics, I don't need them. If I get hit by a large vehicle and I'm in a four banger the likelihood of me dying and them living is almost laughable. I have personally seen small cars obliterated by trucks with grill guards. I'm not sure where you live, but here in Texas I feel much safer in a large vehicle.

    Additionally, IMHO, I feel I am a good driver. Another thing, your 2.0L 4 cylinder could never replace the utility and power of my truck. Thusly it would not suit my needs in a vehicle.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    164
    The quickest ways to die in an automobile accident is to:

    1. Drive drunk
    2. Drive without the proper use of safety gear like a seat belt, or turn off the air bags if you have that feature
    3. Don't wear a seat belt and drive drunk
    4. Don't wear a seat belt, drive drunk, and drive way too fast for the conditions.

    Man can't overcome the laws of physics, the bigger vehicle with more mass will always win, but wearing a seat belt will GREATLY increase your chances of survival no matter how big or small a vehicle you may be driving.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    54
    If I recall correctly, I remember reading a study about how the occupants of a smaller car in a multiple-car collision would be more likely to die - you're right, you can't beat physics.

    However, they found that occupants of larger vehicles (trucks, SUVs) were more likely than occupants of smaller cars to be involved in, and die, in single-vehicle accidents (eg. rollovers, etc.).

    This is likely due to bigger vehicles' higher centre of gravity, but also the mentality that goes with driving a big truck. i.e the feeling that you are safe, or that the 4wd will protect you from ending up in the ditch.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    409
    I agree that we all need to do our part to help conserve fuel. The prices are becoming ridiculous so anything we can do to help is important. Beyond the financial we also have to make concessions for the environment. For these two reasons I have decided it would be advantageous to follow Alís example and go green. I recently decided to trade in the Hummer in favor of a more environmentally friendly Bell Jet Ranger and a Leer jet. This should permit me access to the hard to access trails while still showing as much concern for the current fuel situation and the environment as the Nobel Piece winner himself and our elected officials. Not to mention I will save hours over sitting in traffic listening to all the commoners cursing and blowing their horns.

  28. #28
    MTB Addict
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    830
    So you're saying you traded an SUV for a helicopter and a jet?!? Wow, that must be cool.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    409
    Just going for effect, I could never do such a thing. I have to leave that for our politicians

  30. #30
    LCI #1853
    Reputation: PscyclePath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    328
    I drive a Dodge Ram pickup. My daily commute is about 52 miles per day on a round trip basis if I don't have to go anywhere else, like the grocery store or wherever.

    Started a hybrid commute at least several days per week, where I drive in to a commuter lot about 12 miles, then bike in the final nine miles to the office. Save right around half the gas, since I avoid all the freeways and the bike route is about 4.5 miles shorter since we have a local trails system.

    It works... if you're serious about saving gas, regardless of the green or carbon emissions perspective, there's a way to mamke your bike work more for you.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation: scaryguy137's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    48
    to hxll with all you fxxxing posers.

    thats my opinion

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SteveF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    2,335
    Quote Originally Posted by mtb416
    I feel completely unsafe in a car of that size, this is just an opinion. As for statistics, I don't need them. If I get hit by a large vehicle and I'm in a four banger the likelihood of me dying and them living is almost laughable. I have personally seen small cars obliterated by trucks with grill guards. I'm not sure where you live, but here in Texas I feel much safer in a large vehicle.

    Additionally, IMHO, I feel I am a good driver. Another thing, your 2.0L 4 cylinder could never replace the utility and power of my truck. Thusly it would not suit my needs in a vehicle.

    Grill guards shouldn't even be street legal--big square-nosed vehicles are a sufficient hazard without adding armor! Small cars are going to become more common--you're only making a case against yourself when you point out the damage big vehicles (like the one you prefer/need) can do to them.

  33. #33
    Outrageously happy
    Reputation: Roeland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by scaryguy137
    to hxll with all you fxxxing posers.

    thats my opinion
    switch to decaf,...


  34. #34
    LCI #1853
    Reputation: PscyclePath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    328
    Quote Originally Posted by scaryguy137
    to hxll with all you fxxxing posers.

    thats my opinion
    D00d, you seriously need to stop whatever you're doing now and go take a ride.

  35. #35

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    59
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveF
    Grill guards shouldn't even be street legal--big square-nosed vehicles are a sufficient hazard without adding armor! Small cars are going to become more common--you're only making a case against yourself when you point out the damage big vehicles (like the one you prefer/need) can do to them.
    I couldn't agree more. Modern cars and trucks have crumble zones on the frame(resemble accordians). The frame rails, bumpers and body are designed to crush upon impact. It essentially absorbs the shock of a collision so you don't have to. People often put on these guards to protect their cars in case they hit a deer where i live. So when they install them they either bolt, or even 'smarter' weld them to the frame. So the consequence is that not only are you putting the driver at risk, whoever they get into a collision with ends up taking the full force of their momentum as well.
    Using vehicle size as a safety measure is very relative. With all the new hummers driving around, I would need a semi to be safe driving now. In the fifties, car makers told us that cars where safe and it was the 'maniac at the wheel' that caused all death. We all know now that wasn't true and i believe that this bigger is safer idea is of a similiar misconception.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SteveF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    2,335
    Quote Originally Posted by lifelesspoet
    I couldn't agree more. Modern cars and trucks have crumble zones on the frame(resemble accordians). The frame rails, bumpers and body are designed to crush upon impact. It essentially absorbs the shock of a collision so you don't have to. People often put on these guards to protect their cars in case they hit a deer where i live. So when they install them they either bolt, or even 'smarter' weld them to the frame. So the consequence is that not only are you putting the driver at risk, whoever they get into a collision with ends up taking the full force of their momentum as well.
    Using vehicle size as a safety measure is very relative. With all the new hummers driving around, I would need a semi to be safe driving now. In the fifties, car makers told us that cars where safe and it was the 'maniac at the wheel' that caused all death. We all know now that wasn't true and i believe that this bigger is safer idea is of a similiar misconception.

    I meant that such guards were more dangerous to pedestrians and cyclists and other cars, but your point about brush guards bypassing designed-in crumple zones is a good one. Anyone can build a battering ram, add weight, add mass, survive a crash by simply overwhelming the other vehicle. That's selfish safety and poor engineering! It's very possible to build a safe, yet still compact and efficient vehicle--Subaru does it particularly well, just off the top of my head.

  37. #37

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    30
    I had an 07 GTI that got about 27mpg city, but traded it for a 4 banger Wrangler that gets under 20mpg. I love the wrangler though so it's fine by me.

  38. #38
    Jackass
    Reputation: pesqueeb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    248
    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    Hippies- cool. So, if we were to convert my wife`s Saturn to biodeisel, would that make her hippy enough to stop shaving her legs? If she did that, maybe I`d take to pedaling more and start shaving mine. Win-win. The same number of disposeable BICs to the landfill but evberybody just a little bit weirder and a little bit happier!
    This is the greatest thing I have ever read on this board.
    I'm making enemies faster than I can kill them!

  39. #39
    knock-knock...
    Reputation: skottt160's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    577
    the thing with subys though is they run pseudo four wheel drive all the time, killing your gas mileage there with the unnecessary powering of two wheels. sure the handling might be nice, but the rest of the world has managed to get by on 2wd, and the gas mileage would be so much better without all that power lost.

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    4
    I drive my gto on the weekend and the bike during the week , it's not that I can't afford the gas, but seriously why bother it's not as if im in a hurry to get to work
    one is more fun than the other, and it's not the car :


  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    5
    I drive a large truck with a diesel and commute by bike because I enjoy it not due to fuel savings. The money saved is a nice bonus to riding my bike though. Commuting also allows me to put in a lot of extra base miles for mountain biking.

    I would drive something smaller but it's not practical for my needs. I tow a fairly large trailer during dirt bike season here in So Cal and haul the dirt bikes in the bed when not towing. Also have a large family.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GCRad1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    42

    Peddle More to Pay Less so Wife can keep...

    I peddle this more:


    To stop driving this Civic:


    So the wife can keep transporting the kids to school and activities around in the liquid dinosaur sucker:

    Plus any family activities that require carrying all the stuff such as 3-kids, dog, two adults and all the camping gear! Thank goodness for ROOF RACKS!


    Now if I could just get the family into Adventure-Bike-Camping...

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    372
    I drive a Ford Econoline E350 12 passenger van with the seats removed and a partion in it for hauling dirt bikes. I also pull a 18 foot travel trailer with it.

    My wife drives a Nissan Pathfinder although she's looking at getting a 4wd Toyota Tacoma in the next year or so.

    I've never owned a "car." I've always had trucks and SUVs. Both vehicles are driven less than 10K a year and I always bought used and always paid cash for my rigs. I wouldn't know what to do with a "car" if I had one.

    I live 3 miles from work and can commute on my mountain bike or one of my dirt bikes that's dual sported. My wife lives the same distance from her work and she does the same.

    We use the van and the Pathfinder for our adventures and road trips. Like others have said, I rarely drive and when I do it's based on hauling something, driving a long way, sleeping somewhere, picking something up, etc. and I'm not gonna get it done with some goofy little apartment dweller type's car.

    BTW, the arguments about crashes and vehicle size are plain silly. Come on. Quit it. Please. If you T-bone me in my Pathfinder in your little clown car on the freeway...who do you really think is gonna win? And to add, do you think I'm going to stick my infant in some silly little car with the level of disregard people have driving down here in SoCal?

    If you doubt that a "car" is capable of disenegrating, spend some time on our freeways.

  44. #44
    Silence! I kill you!
    Reputation: Jorgemonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    3,049
    My bike gets around 18-20 miles per can of chili.
    My photography website:
    Scott Mosher Photography

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    794
    At some point (when money allows), I'll take a Jeep and throw a diesel in it, then I can have a big, useable vehicle, but still get 30+ mpg and the ability to run on biodiesel.
    Yeah when I finish med school and actually start making money rather than going into debt I plan on buying a more full efficient car, finding a good diesel engine converting it to biodiesel, and installing it in my 99 jeep wrangler.

    I mean my 99 wrangler is a 4 banger with 2.2 L engine. The back seat is out of it, regular tune ups, keep oil changed, no AC, no cruise control, standard.

    I basically have a large golf cart. I drive the thing about 30 miles a week if I am lucky. I live about 3 miles outside of town on a major highway and commuting to classes is difficult to do because
    1. no place to change when you get there
    2. always have to be in dress clothes due to the clinical nature of my job
    3. early morning classes and late night classes means night biking and people don't pay attention on the roads here


    So I drive the 6 miles round trip five days a week = 30 miles

    Walk to the grocery store down the street my country apartment and get groceries and other needs.

    Stop at the store on the way home from classes if need be since it's on the same road.

    It's simply about conserving. I applaud those people who don't use their cars at all or don't own one, but in south east ohio you need a car to get around. The roads are so piss poor here and everything is so far away that it's not worth it financially or health wise

    I pay $650 for my apartment (2 bedroom) in the country + utilities = $800 a month

    I live 3 miles outside of town.

    I could live in town near the bike path and walk to classes/work but the rent on a 1 bedroom studio would be $900 a month + utilities. - No thanks I will pocket that money and just spend a few extra bucks on gas a month, commute a day or two when I can and pocket the extra $150 a month or so I save.

    Good for everyone who can go green, but right now I just can't do it. I've tried.

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    551
    speaking of older cars that get as good of mileage as newer more technologically advanced vehicles..

    my 86 chevy s10 TRUCK with 4 cylinder engine and 210,000 miles that i only paid 500 dollars for gets 25 mpg every tank. thats mixed driving, highway and city. i actually try to avoid the interstate because its hard on it going up hills at 60 mph.

    so if you think about it i am being much better on the environment by buying an old clanker than the people who go out and buy brand new hybrids.

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    310
    i drive a pickup, 3.0 V6 Ford ranger, i get 22 mpg highway and im ok with that, 90% of my driving is highway to and from work.

    when i go to my next job within a year, im planning on moving to a place where i can commute by bike..not to "go green" but to be more efficient (i dont like hyped up tag lines)

    but ive owned lots of cars, and this is my 2nd truck, love it and i plan on running it into the ground, never gonna sell it.

    also, the comment about brush guards affecting crumple zones...yeah thats not true. the brush guards are usually attached to the bumper, or the front of the frame, the crumple zones on trucks are on the longitudinal parts of the frame, where the brush guards are not attached to.

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Urnicus's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    308
    Quote Originally Posted by mtb416
    I drive a V8 truck and love it. I will never give up the power and utility of a large SUV or truck, even with the poor gas mileage and high prices. All I need to do is commute/run errands by bike more. With gas prices as high as they are, I find saving money enough motivation. Of course I would save a lot more money if I bought a four banger car, but I would probably die a horrible death by the hands of a SuperDuty.
    Kudos. You win the stupid post of the month prize.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    428
    I'm a homeowner and I need to haul dirt and stuff once in a while. When I need a truck, I rent one. It doesn't cost much and I don't have to maintain it or carry insurance on it. Also, when I rent a truck, it's nearly new and is much cleaner burning than an 80's vehicle that I might be able to afford to own.

    I'm not saying trucks don't have their place. They absolutely do. After all, I grew up on a farm. I'm just proposing an alternative that might work for some people here who use their truck once or twice a year.

    Of course, there is the emotional attachment. My first vehicle was a 1970 Dodge half-ton with a 318. I loved that truck. But...my needs are different now and so I own a car and a motorcycle and a bicycle.

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    794
    I'm a homeowner and I need to haul dirt and stuff once in a while. When I need a truck, I rent one. It doesn't cost much and I don't have to maintain it or carry insurance on it. Also, when I rent a truck, it's nearly new and is much cleaner burning than an 80's vehicle that I might be able to afford to own.
    Not a knock on Tweezak, but I used to own a 4X4 Ford Ranger pick up and I got sick and tired of my friends who wouldn't buy a truck because of the country stereotype and because they didn't feel the need to own one, yet whenever someone needed moved, or to hunting, etc. guess who they always bugged the **** out of to use the truck? Me.

    Got tired of that ****. If people want the use of a truck they can either rent one or buy one and stop mooching off friends. Trust me I am not a dick, but you get tired of always being the person expected to drop everything and move friends. Hell I've helped at least 20 people move in the last 3 years and no one helped me move into my apartment. Kind of funny how that happens.

    Like I said I got tired of the always being asked to help move stuff and bought a jeep wrangler and took the back seat out of it. Now no one asks me to drive anywhere or move anything. About all they ask is to take a drive with the top down or to carry bikes when we go biking.

    Unfortunately in south east ohio it's not like a city. You can't drive 10 minutes and get to a car rental place. So you either own a truck, a car and a trailer, or you expect your friends or family to cart your **** for you.

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    428
    Quote Originally Posted by DrNickels
    Not a knock on Tweezak, but I used to own a 4X4 Ford Ranger pick up and I got sick and tired of my friends who wouldn't buy a truck because of the country stereotype and because they didn't feel the need to own one, yet whenever someone needed moved, or to hunting, etc. guess who they always bugged the **** out of to use the truck? Me.

    Got tired of that ****. If people want the use of a truck they can either rent one or buy one and stop mooching off friends.
    LOL!!!
    Oh, man can I ever relate. It's the curse of owning a truck. You never know how many friends you have until you buy a pickup.

    I think we are in total agreement. Like I said, renting is not a solution for everyone but it should work for some.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.