Do you prefer tall seatpost for commuting?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Do you prefer tall seatpost for commuting?

    My friend questions me regarding the seatpost height. They claim my is too low and I will not feel uncomfortable after long distance cycling(Yes, I agreed).

    But as a commuter. I take priority more on safety/practical. Cos a lower seatpost allows my foot to touch the road. When commuting, u will encounter lots of traffic light or junction which means stoppage. I don't want to always jump down and up from my seatpost.

    And when doing e-brake in some cases, jumping off from seatpost is dangerous and result in momentous force pushing u forward even applying full brake.

    Anybody adjust high seatpost for commuting?

  2. #2

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    i ride with my seat post as high as i can put it for proper fitting which allows just my toes to touch the ground from the seat. Even when riding on the concrete jungle through traffic and having to stop periodically. Proper fitting to prevent injury (i have bad knees) is more important to me than having to rest a foot down or get off the seat. My opinion would be to ride whats comfortable for you. i wouldnt ride with it all the way down but if you dont feel safe with the post up high then the answer is simple, dont do it!

  3. #3
    local trails rider
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    I keep my seat high. I can still get my toes on the ground.

    If I have to brake hard, I move my weight back. Just like on trails.

  4. #4
    I'm feeling dirty, you?
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    Well I set the saddle height to where I think it needs to be for me to be comfortable, so in the full extension of the stroke, I have that bit of bend in my knee, doesn't matter what bike.

    Need to stop at a junction?, with this 'high" saddle height? Well learn to trackstand or dismount; for me sure beats doing the splits trying to tip-toe while on the saddle, or having a low saddle height where the upstoke makes me feel like I'm squatting while riding.

    E-stop... we're mountain bikers right? I'd think most of us are experienced enough to squat behind the saddle to get the weight distribution backwards for heavy braking, downhills, and such.... Unless you've got a monster saddle bag or rack-top bag getting in the way.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by shimano4
    My friend questions me regarding the seatpost height. They claim my is too low and I will not feel uncomfortable after long distance cycling(Yes, I agreed).

    But as a commuter. I take priority more on safety/practical. Cos a lower seatpost allows my foot to touch the road. When commuting, u will encounter lots of traffic light or junction which means stoppage. I don't want to always jump down and up from my seatpost.

    And when doing e-brake in some cases, jumping off from seatpost is dangerous and result in momentous force pushing u forward even applying full brake.

    Anybody adjust high seatpost for commuting?
    Your description of coming off the seat during an emergency braking situation is extremely dangerous. It sounds like you are setting yourself up to go over the handlebars.

    In any situation where you are applying heavy brake, you should lean back to counteract momentum which will throw your weight forward. You will get better braking by keeping the rear wheel from lifting up, better balance as your center of gravity shifts, and a better position if you were to crash.

    I've practiced moving my butt off the saddle to the rear since I first started riding, and I use it while mountain biking, road racing, and commuting.

    The other part is that you sound like you are very uncomfortable stopping and other slow speed situations. First of all, I can touch the ground fine while seated by just leaning over when I stop. But because I can track-stand, I won't even need to unclip at stop lights.

    You should practice going slow in a parking lot or a grassy field. Try it on a slight incline so the bike will not keep slipping forward.

    Finally, saddle height should be determined solely by your proper pedaling position. No if, ands, or buts.

  6. #6
    Bedwards Of The West
    Reputation: CommuterBoy's Avatar
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    I want proper position on the bike regardless of what I'm doing on the bike.
    If you're in proper position you're going to have better control anyway.

    My seatpost pretty much only gets lowered on steep downhill sections of trail... none of those on my commute though, sorry to say.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  7. #7
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    It's your knees.

  8. #8
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    Yeah, I have to have the seatpost as high as is necessary or my knees scream in protest and I can't get enough power when climbing. I completely agree that it is better to have the bike set up properly so that you have better control. Maybe your bike is too large to begin with? I'm 6' 00" with a 30" inseam, so I tend to run them a bit small in the first place, because I have better control, can reach the ground at a stop and have enough top tube clearance in case I have to slide forward off the seat at a stop (happen more in MTBing than commuting).
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  9. #9
    occupation : Foole
    Reputation: Fuelish's Avatar
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    Hmmmm .... haven't ridden a bike that I can touch the ground when on the saddle since, oh, back in the very early '70's on my old banana-seated Schwinn StingRay .....
    Proper fit is way more important (for your knees sake, as previously posted) than the imagined "danger" of not being able to touch the ground seated. relax, and ride with the proper seat height, and practice the skills needed to counter your fears of whatever - it's all a no brainer with practice

  10. #10
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    I keep mine high to no ill effect. My pedaling efficiency is most important. I can get a toe down. I put my left foot down usually because the crown of the road has it higher on that side. This can be slightly hazardous too because the bicycle has a tendency to fall to the opposite, low side of the road.

  11. #11
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    If you want to be able to touch the ground, you'll need a bike that has a more forward positioned crank axle. A cruiser bike comes to mind. Some cruisers like the Electra Townie allow you to have your feet flat on the floor when seated. I like something in between where I can tip toe to touch the ground. It's more relaxing to be in an upright position as well as lower to the ground while in traffic.

    I used to be in mountain biking position while riding and found it's not ideal for commuting. The upright position also allows you to see traffic better. Try it.

  12. #12
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    I don`t see what danger you`re talking about either. If you need to put a foot down, put a foot down- just take your butt off the saddle when you do it. When you`re rolling, your TIRES need to be on the road (hopefully), your butt goes on the saddle if you want, and your feet only need to reach the pedals. What could be simpler? Besides that, have you noticed that quick maneuvering is actually easier when you`re up higher? Think about it- when you need to do something tricky, you stand up so that you have more leverage and more room to apply body english. If you`re squatted down like a cholo on a lowrider, how the heck do you pull off an emergency move?

    "And when doing e-brake in some cases, jumping off from seatpost is dangerous and result in momentous force pushing u forward even applying full brake."
    I dunno there- you lost me, so I can`t comment one way or the other.

  13. #13
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    High. Need to stop, find a curb.

  14. #14
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    I keep my seat post high for proper positioning and pedaling efficiency. On an mtb with elevated bottom bracket clearance, that also means I can't touch the ground while in the saddle. To me it's simply a matter of learning how to properly mount/dismount a modern mountain bike as opposed to a cruiser. You might want to check out this article at sheldon brown's for some info on the topic; there's a nice video there even: http://sheldonbrown.com/starting.html

  15. #15
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    Another reading from teh Gospel According to Sheldon:

    "Most people start with the saddle too low. This is a habit left over from childhood, because growing children almost always have their saddles too low for efficient pedaling. First they have it low for security while they are learning to balance, then, even once they have mastered balancing, their growth rate tends to keep them ahead of their saddle adjustment.

    If you always ride with your saddle too low, you get used to it, and don't realize that there is a problem...but there is. Riding with the saddle too low is like walking with your knees bent (as Groucho Marx often did for comedic effect.) If you walked that way all the time, you'd also get used to that, but you'd think that half a mile was a long walk. The way the human leg is made, it is strongest when it is nearly straight."

    About halfway down the page, the section entitled "How High?"http://www.sheldonbrown.com/saddles.html
    OP can do what he wants- that`s all I`m going to pester him with now.

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