Do you blend in?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 40 of 40
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    13,604

    Do you blend in?

    I see a lot of black, dark blue, and earth tone colors on cycling clothing these days and very few riders seem to use lights during the day. One day while driving home from work as the light was starting to fade I nearly killed a cyclist. He was wearing a dark green jacket, black pants, black helmet, no lights and blended in nicely with the road and roadside vegetation. I did see him in time, but just.

    Don't be a fashion slave. Wear hi-vis reflective clothing, gaudy socks, bright helmets and run lights at all times. While out on the road you're at the mercy of complete strangers wielding 3,000 pound death wagons and though your fate is in their hands and mostly beyond your control there are some things you can do to increase your odds. How you ride is a big one, being visible is another.

    Cycling is awesome and commuting by bike is commendable imo. Y'all are a special breed, stay safe out there!
    I brake for stinkbugs

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ghettocruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,761
    I don't disagree with what you wrote, but I'll play devils advocate just a bit.

    So on my way home now on the MUP I'm riding in darkness, the only light is what I provide. I have a modest 500LM headlight and three 150LM running lights. I gotta be honest, even the most ninja of cyclists usually have at least one dirty reflector somewhere that betrays their presence.

    But a related rant: Where the hell do people even find jogging clothes and running shoes that are completely black with no reflective piping. Do they have them custom made?!

    I mean, in my headlights I can see the flash-back of old construction pylons off in the weeds that have been there since the '90s. Even deer and raccoons on the path have some glint from their eyes at night.

    But pedestrians? Nada. I can sometimes see the blue flash from their wireless headphones, but then they put their hoods up, and I don't even get that.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ghettocruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,761
    Related content:

    Quote Originally Posted by Canadian Cyclist Magazine
    Colours are Softening
    “The trending colours are what I’d call ‘a little less sheen, a little more green,’ which is really to say that the majority of the apparel world wants to keep doing roadwear, but to ‘gravelize’ it. They’re using more matte finishes and a more muted, natural palette,” explains Lawrence Silcox, co-founder of Cima Coppi Cycle Wear.
    Seguin adds that pastels and muted tones are definitely the current trend. “The flashy, bright, racing style has definitely fallen out of style,” he notes.

    Sam Whittingham of Naked Bicycles on B.C.’s Quadra Island agrees, noting that when his company gets custom colour requests, pastels with a minor pop of colour are popular now. The brief vibrant-neon trend seems to be dead..
    Yeah..... I mean, what could go wrong?
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  4. #4
    Wanna ride bikes?
    Reputation: *OneSpeed*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    7,783
    Related content. A pretty disturbing position from the NTSB.

    https://www.bicycling.com/culture/a2...ndations-2019/
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    13,604
    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    Related content. A pretty disturbing position from the NTSB.

    https://www.bicycling.com/culture/a2...ndations-2019/


    Disturbing? Yes, but it is the reality us road warriors must deal with. I agree infrastructure changes would be the biggest safety improvement (and also get a lot more people riding) but I'm not holding my breath for that to happen. Every time I hit the pavement I recognize the peril but accept it anyway, it is a personal choice.


    Totally disagree with this (from the linked article)

    I’m not even sure where to start with this idea that calls upon cyclists to be more conspicuous. I’m certainly not arguing against riding with lights after dark, nor am I questioning people’s interest in gear like high vis apparel and daytime running lights. But this idea that folks riding bikes need to wear specialized clothing so motorists don’t hit them, especially when so many other dangerous driver behaviors and issues are being overlooked, is an insult to the perils American cyclists face every day. Like if you think I need to wear fluoro kit or a blinking vest because it’s just too challenging to see me on the road, maybe you should stow your iPhone or slow down or altogether reconsider driving a motor vehicle.

    Wear what you want but realize it does make a difference, as mentioned by my experience in the op.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BrianMc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,400
    I just kept adding lights, reflective bits, and hi-vis until I stopped the motorists tailgating 3' off my rear wheel on a street I can't avoid and got them to not nearly side swipe me elsewhere. If I am hit, they will have no reasonable excuse for not seeing me. I have had issues seeing pedestrians on that same road (no sidewalks). Also just missed hitting a Ninja Cyclist who ran the stop sign from my left so I did not pick him out until I was launching. He then entered the 1-way street the wrong way. No reflectors at all. We were both lucky I had not launched one second sooner.

  7. #7
    NDD
    NDD is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: NDD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,561
    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    Related content. A pretty disturbing position from the NTSB.

    https://www.bicycling.com/culture/a2...ndations-2019/
    Yeah, I'll say the recommendations are not inherently bad, but that they focus the blame completely away from drivers is ridiculous, as the person navigating the vehicle with the greatest potential to cause damage or harm to other people should be the one ensuring they don't kill other people. I think the the sheer potential for destruction is lost on most people driving. It really bugs me out.

    I do take issue with this quote, though:

    What tends to be overlooked in reporting this statistic is that it also means half of all cyclists killed were wearing a helmet, that despite whatever safety benefits these products may confer in certain situations, a foam cap is not a failsafe protection to people when they are run over by multi-ton vehicles traveling at a high rate of speed.
    So half of fatalities were cyclists without helmets and half of them were cyclists with helmets. What this ignores is the total number of accidents in each group. These total fatalities should be weighted by the number of total accidents within each group so you get a proportion. The better question is "What proportion of cyclists wearing helmets died in car accidents versus those that were not wearing helmets".
    dang

  8. #8
    Wanna ride bikes?
    Reputation: *OneSpeed*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    7,783
    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    I do take issue with this quote, though:



    So half of fatalities were cyclists without helmets and half of them were cyclists with helmets. What this ignores is the total number of accidents in each group. These total fatalities should be weighted by the number of total accidents within each group so you get a proportion. The better question is "What proportion of cyclists wearing helmets died in car accidents versus those that were not wearing helmets".
    ^ I agree, the percentages should be considered, and published (they probably are, somewhere), but the fact that it's roughly 50/50 tells me that the helmet is not the biggest factor in this equation. People are being killed wether they are wearing a helmet or not.

    I'm certainly not saying helmets aren't important, they are, I'm a big fan, but getting hit from behind at 60mph by an SUV makes the helmet pretty irrelevant. The drivers need to be held accountable for their driving. And right now most often the dead cyclist is blamed and the driver is ticketed with a minor violation. It's wrong.

    The part of that article I like is the statistic about helmet use in other parts of the world where they don't wear them, and the death rate is a fraction of what it is in the US.
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    13,604
    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    The part of that article I like is the statistic about helmet use in other parts of the world where they don't wear them, and the death rate is a fraction of what it is in the US.

    All due to infrastructure and laws that protect cyclists and pedestrians.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  10. #10
    NDD
    NDD is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: NDD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,561
    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    ^ I agree, the percentages should be considered, and published (they probably are, somewhere), but the fact that it's roughly 50/50 tells me that the helmet is not the biggest factor in this equation. People are being killed wether they are wearing a helmet or not.
    You're absolutely right that it's not the only factor, and probably not the biggest. But let's say there were 400 people hit with helmets and 100 died, also there were 200 people without helmets and 100 died. Yes, it's 50/50, but not nearly a moot point. I think we're really on the same page with this, anyway.

    I'm certainly not saying helmets aren't important, they are, I'm a big fan, but getting hit from behind at 60mph by an SUV makes the helmet pretty irrelevant. The drivers need to be held accountable for their driving. And right now most often the dead cyclist is blamed and the driver is ticketed with a minor violation. It's wrong.

    The part of that article I like is the statistic about helmet use in other parts of the world where they don't wear them, and the death rate is a fraction of what it is in the US.
    And this is the crux of what's wrong in our current road-use culture. The fact that we absolutely need helmets to give ourselves any sense of a chance in an accident. Moreso, there are seldom repercussions for having needlessly hurt or killed someone. Look at the situation near Squeaky. That woman will only be charged with fleeing the scene of an accident, and she'll probably get off. That's bullshit. Of course some cyclists make us all look bad. It's like when you see a "start seeing motorcycles" sticker on a vehicle, and then see a guy on a motorcycle weaving through traffic, riding in people's blind spots. That's what people think of when they see bicyclists, too. It's hard for us, too, to make people realize that we're really not all that bad, and that's a thing this article could also show us, besides what useless organizations the NTSA and LE still are in this respect.
    dang

  11. #11
    Wanna ride bikes?
    Reputation: *OneSpeed*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    7,783
    The "Worst of the worst" thread highlights what I'm talking about. I recently posted a local story of a school teacher killed by a truck, and the driver was given a "traffic citation for failing to safely pass a bicycle." Not a case of victim blaming, but is that really a sufficient punishment for killing someone? It's honestly shocking. And wrong.

    How did that even become a ticket? "failing to safely pass a bicycle?" Who voted that into law? Is the penalty is the same for "no contact" and killing someone? Seriously, WTF is that?

    https://www.whec.com/news/brockport-...crash/5516619/
    Rigid SS 29er
    SS 29+
    Fat Lefty
    SS cyclocross
    Full Sus 29er (Yuck)

    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  12. #12
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,388
    Sadly, it seems killing people with your car is becoming more and more acceptable in our society in general.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ghettocruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,761
    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    Where the hell do people even find jogging clothes and running shoes that are completely black with no reflective piping. Do they have them custom made?!
    I said this, and on the way way home a few hours later, the first jogger I see on the MUP was wearing a light-up vest that looked like an octopus made of light sabers.

    I was, in a word, impressed.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ghettocruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,761
    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Wear what you want but realize it does make a difference, as mentioned by my experience in the op.
    It made a difference because when you drive you watch the road.

    IMO, you are in an ever-shrinking demographic in that regard.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    13,604
    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    The "Worst of the worst" thread highlights what I'm talking about. I recently posted a local story of a school teacher killed by a truck, and the driver was given a "traffic citation for failing to safely pass a bicycle." Not a case of victim blaming, but is that really a sufficient punishment for killing someone? It's honestly shocking. And wrong.

    How did that even become a ticket? "failing to safely pass a bicycle?" Who voted that into law? Is the penalty is the same for "no contact" and killing someone? Seriously, WTF is that?

    https://www.whec.com/news/brockport-...crash/5516619/


    I'm not opposed to a little thread drift but I take those things as a given and beyond my control. This topic is about things you can control to increase your odds and the fact that lots of people don't do them, partly due to fashion trends.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    13,604
    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    It made a difference because when you drive you watch the road.

    IMO, you are in an ever-shrinking demographic in that regard.


    Maybe, but I think plenty of people still do pay some attention to the road. I ride on narrow mountain roads with no shoulders, yesterday maybe a few dozen cars passed me and every one had to go into the opposing lane to do so and most of them slowed down so I assume they all were watching the road and saw me.

    Even if only 50% of drivers are paying attention you can increase your odds of being seen by them and therefore increase your overall odds of surviving somewhat, and I do believe that with enough flashiness you have a shot at attracting the attention of a non-attentive driver.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    13,604
    When I'm riding on rural, low traffic roads and hear a car coming from behind I'll get out in the middle of the road for a bit maybe even weave back and forth a little before moving over to the right, I think it increases your chances of being noticed a fair amount.

    I only do this when the car is a ways back and for sure I'm not causing the driver to alter their speed to avoid hitting me.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  18. #18
    psycho cyclo addict
    Reputation: edubfromktown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,884
    I wear reflective items (and also have a few reflective straps strategically placed on my bikes as well).

    Commuter bike has dyno front hub and light on. I wear a flasher on the back of my helmet and add two different color handlebar lights sometimes.
    【ツ】 eDub 【ツ】

    Gravel bike w/ MTB tires
    Rigid steel SS 29er
    Rigid titanium SS 27.5
    Full suspension 29er
    Hard Tail 29er

  19. #19
    Rides all the bikes!
    Reputation: Sidewalk's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    3,548
    I was recently passing through the area of a local college and noticed the telltale signs of a bicycle in the dark. Like an astronomer, noticing the dimming light of a star from a planet passing in front of it. When I turned onto the road, I knew (s)he was there...but couldn't find the bike. It wasn't until I was nearly right on top of the cyclist (I was doing less than the 35 MPH limit) that I was finally able to see the bike and rider, no helmet, make a sudden turn out of the middle of the road in front of me into a parking lot.

    Reminded me of the time a few years ago where I somehow didn't die. Riding a high speed mountain highway at night, not realizing my crappy taillight had quit. I was newer to cycling, and poor. I don't know how I survived that night.

    My current kit isn't terribly stand out like. But, my jacket, shoe covers, and arm sleeves are all neon yellow, as well as my helmet. And I do have a good set of lights now, quality ones (Cycliq on my roadie).

    I think of my helmet as a form of protection from the ground, or standing object. It isn't to protect me from other road users. If/when I get hit by a car, luck will play more into my survival than my lid. But if I have a wreck at 20 MPH and bounce off a tree, the foam up there should make a huge difference.

    As often as I am seeing people intentionally drive reckless, let alone intentionally, I don't know if there is anything I can do to mitigate the risks other than "don't ride", and I'm not doing that.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ghettocruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,761
    It's may be a good time for a repost of this:

    https://www.sheldonbrown.com/reflectors.html

    ....bearing in mind that most, although not all, of the limitations of plastic reflectors also apply to modern reflective gear.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  21. #21
    EAT MORE GRIME
    Reputation: 127.0.0.1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    5,176
    I have conspicuity tape on my bikes in strategic locations

    super hi viz helmet and helmet cover

    fricking lights, I got 'em. daylight visible tail lights, got 'em always
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BrianMc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,400
    I set my car up at the end of my driveway and made video of different lighting and reflector setups. The camera is maybe as sensitive as an elderly person's night vision so is a reasonable worst case. The reflectors and reflective clothing showed up just in time to let drivers know what they hit. Reflectors/reflective clothing above the low bean cutoff never showed up. It is a good idea to have a sense of how we look to drivers. I opted for a very narrow "high beam" helmet light that I can aim at drivers on cross streets. They have a habit of not stopping or not stopping long enough to see a cyclist. Hitting their night vision is not great but an accident will inconvenience them more and might kill me.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    13,604
    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    I set my car up at the end of my driveway and made video of different lighting and reflector setups. The camera is maybe as sensitive as an elderly person's night vision so is a reasonable worst case. The reflectors and reflective clothing showed up just in time to let drivers know what they hit. Reflectors/reflective clothing above the low bean cutoff never showed up. It is a good idea to have a sense of how we look to drivers. I opted for a very narrow "high beam" helmet light that I can aim at drivers on cross streets. They have a habit of not stopping or not stopping long enough to see a cyclist. Hitting their night vision is not great but an accident will inconvenience them more and might kill me.


    I've seen reflectors and reflective clothing on riders from a long ways out while driving, maybe a few hundred yards or more and often they really stand out ime, especially the ones that move (e.g. shoes) I think reflectors are a smart addition for bikes and clothing but they pretty much only work at night and I only ride roads during the daytime. Lights front & rear for me.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  24. #24
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,388
    I think a lot of people that when they are walking or biking as it is getting dark, assume that others can see them as well as they can see. They don't take into account the speed, temporary night blindness from headlights, etc that reduces others vision.

    I didn't realize that high viz was a style trend. I have no problem with being out of style. Just looking at cars, darker ones are more likely to be involved in a crash than brighter ones.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    982
    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    I think a lot of people that when they are walking or biking as it is getting dark, assume that others can see them as well as they can see. They don't take into account the speed, temporary night blindness from headlights, etc that reduces others vision.

    I didn't realize that high viz was a style trend. I have no problem with being out of style. Just looking at cars, darker ones are more likely to be involved in a crash than brighter ones.
    Yup, when im on the road commuting i dress for survival. My boss at work saw my shirt hanging and remarked fir such a low key guy you got quite the shirt, i told him same thing.
    And yes, it amazes me when i see these beatiful runners on the road at dark, in black tights and tanktops, virtually invisible. Have had some step out in front when im driving and i dont see them till last second.
    Ive got my screaming orange shirt, reflective ankle bands, headlight, two taillights, white helmet with reflective stripes. If any motirist gives the excuse “i didnt see you”, i can show up in court kitted exactly how i ride and bring that seriously into question, lol

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BrianMc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,400
    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I've seen reflectors and reflective clothing on riders from a long ways out while driving, maybe a few hundred yards or more and often they really stand out ime, especially the ones that move (e.g. shoes) I think reflectors are a smart addition for bikes and clothing but they pretty much only work at night and I only ride roads during the daytime. Lights front & rear for me.
    Yes, directly behind or in front. I was talking about cross street drivers. The reflectors are all but useless for drivers on cross streets and cyclists should see this for themselves as it is normal to think that if they work when you take a picture that they work well all the time. They don't for all the reasons that Sheldon listed.

    I think I saw stats that suggested side traffic had a disproportionate contribution to cycling accidents, but I may remember that wrong. Anyway once well marked front and rear, the side is the next to deal with.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    982
    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    Yes, directly behind or in front. I was talking about cross street drivers. The reflectors are all but useless for drivers on cross streets and cyclists should see this for themselves as it is normal to think that if they work when you take a picture that they work well all the time. They don't for all the reasons that Sheldon listed.

    I think I saw stats that suggested side traffic had a disproportionate contribution to cycling accidents, but I may remember that wrong. Anyway once well marked front and rear, the side is the next to deal with.
    Majority of close calls for me are drivers who rush to pass you and then cut in front of you. Cant wait the 10 seconds (if that) for me to clear intersection or driveway. Unfortunately can be as visible as an angel in hell and it wont help because you know they see you.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BrianMc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,400
    I no longer get the 3' off my rear fender tailgaters I use to get. I figure that I am getting through that I am concerned about my safely and they should be too. I still get some who begin to move right too soon after passing. None have been as close as 8" one driver was in 2009. A decade ago I'd get people trying to pass on the blind hill 0.75 miles from home too close to the stop sign (they have to be back over before they are 100' from the intersection or it is a reckless driving offence). I left two of them stopping for the stop sign in the left lane. The other I should have ridden by taking to the lawn as I almost rear ended the idiot. And I had a witness behind me. I have not had that in years. A few more cyclists do help get drivers to be more aware.

  29. #29
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    7,716
    This is my newest addition to visibility.
    Do you blend in?-knog-plus.jpg
    The white one is 2x as bright as the red one. I put it on a narrowish reflective ankle band and it really pops. It is a neat design with a magnetic end cap, so it stays securely on the band. Take of the cap and plug it directly into a USB outlet, no cable needed. https://www.knog.com.au/plus?___store=usd

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    13,604
    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    Yes, directly behind or in front. I was talking about cross street drivers. The reflectors are all but useless for drivers on cross streets and cyclists should see this for themselves as it is normal to think that if they work when you take a picture that they work well all the time. They don't for all the reasons that Sheldon listed.

    I like Sheldon but that title was a little clickbaity, it could have just as well read "why reflectors work" and listed all the situations where they are useful.

    I don't think any serious cyclist is counting on reflectors 100% to be seen at night but they're a great supplement to lights imo.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BrianMc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,400
    I am a full believer in both lights and reflectors:

    Do you blend in?-vmx9lu.jpg

    A lot of bikes with only pedal and rear reflectors are ridden here at night. Sheldon's article has the right take to change that mindset.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ghettocruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,761
    Two trends in recent years, to add to Sheldon's piece:

    Things get worse: The DRL-vs-dashboard-light fiasco. it used to be be only wanna-be gangsters who would drive around with their headlights off. Now, thanks to the "genius" of automotive engineers, it can be pretty much anybody. This was less of a problem 10 years ago when always-on DRLs at least had a beam to them, even a weak one. Now, most new cars DRLs have been replaced by a LED panel or LED strip, which looks much more fashionable and provides no beam whatsoever, doing absolutely nothing to illuminate the reflective gear I have wrapped myself in.

    Things get better: There are more cars on all the roads I ride than ever before. That's mostly a bad thing, but the odd benefit is that when somebody with headlights off is behind me, the chances are better that there will a conga-line of cars behind them, maybe SUVs with HID beams glaring all over the place, which might just be enough to hit my reflective gear at a close enough angle to the first driver to light me up.

    But yeah. Bike lights. 24-7.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  33. #33
    jrm
    jrm is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jrm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,567
    not really. mostly earth tones and some black. I depend on 1200L light & a big ol red LED blinkie for most if not all of my visibility...

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    314
    Welp, I misplaced one of my rear lights and my other rear light must have gotten turned on in my bag cause it was out of batteries for my commute home. Of course I was wearing black pants, jacket and shoes. At least my helmet is bright yellow, and my panniers are yellow with reflective back panels. Guess I should finally replace my busted dynamo powered rear light.

    Still don't think I want to get hi-vis clothing...quality stuff is expensive so I want to be able to wear it off the bike too.

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BrianMc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,400
    Quote Originally Posted by squeakymcgillicuddy View Post
    Still don't think I want to get hi-vis clothing...quality stuff is expensive so I want to be able to wear it off the bike too.
    The vests that are used by police and road workers are not too expensive and can be layered over everything from a jersey to a winter coat.

    https://www.hivissupply.com/ansi-cla...ebd9202950801d

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    13,604
    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    The vests that are used by police and road workers are not too expensive and can be layered over everything from a jersey to a winter coat.

    https://www.hivissupply.com/ansi-cla...ebd9202950801d

    Yep. As far as gear goes I always figured it's no more expensive in the long run to get dedicated cycling clothing and only wear it on the bike because it will just last that much longer. Function> fashion.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ghettocruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,761
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    13,604
    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post


    I understand the sentiment but disagree with the conclusions. The way I see it anything you can do to improve your visibility to drivers is common sense, not victim blaming. Maybe the naysayers should start dressing in road camo just to prove a point?

    Totally agree that infrastructure changes would do a lot more good but as previously mentioned that ain't happening anytime soon, at least not where I'm at. In the interim I'm doing whatever I can to improve the odds, even if only slightly.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    39
    Weighing in a little late here. I work night shift from 11pm-7am. I commute by bike 3-4 times a week. This time of year in NW Montana that means it's dark both directions, and any combination of weather from rain, snow, ice, and below zero temps.
    I run a Light n Motion Urban 1000 light on my handlebars, Urban 800 on my helmet, and a Light n Motion VIS 180 tail light.
    I wear a high visibility orange coat with big fat reflective strips because I'm required to wear high-vis at work so it's just nice that my work coat also gets the job done for my commute. This time of year I'm riding my fat bike to work and I also have reflective rim tape showing through the holes in my Rollin Darryl wheels. It's pretty safe to say if I get ran over on my way to work it's not because they couldn't see me, it's likely because I blinded them.
    Trek Madone 4.5
    Surly Ice Cream Truck Ops
    Salsa Pony Rustler GX1
    Salsa Timberjack
    Trek Marlin 5
    Salsa Fargo

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ghettocruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,761
    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Maybe the naysayers should start dressing in road camo just to prove a point?
    Alternate idea: A remote-control mannequin on little wheels that waits for the walk signal then and crosses in the crosswalk......and is reinforced with cast-iron.

    I actually had 10 minutes of daylight at the start of the ride home last night. The days grow longer.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-28-2012, 07:53 AM
  2. Replies: 24
    Last Post: 07-29-2011, 05:11 PM
  3. Stones new Anninversary Blend
    By Klurejr in forum Beer Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-13-2011, 12:26 PM

Members who have read this thread: 44

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.