Do idiot cyclists make you mad?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Upset Do idiot cyclists make you mad?

    No seriously. You know who you are. Probably no one that is serious about biking and owns a decent bike but the people who ride INTO oncoming traffic, ride on sidewalks, go through red lights, etc...

    It really makes me mad. I think first and foremost because they are ignorant jerks. Second because they seem to give cars a reason to run bikes off the road. Third because I hate to be the guy that says maybe you ought to have a freakin' license or some kind of saftey/traffic training before you are allowed to ride on public roads.

    I've nearly been killed riding my bike in traffic following the proper rules. Motorists honk their horns, cut too close to me, and generally try to bully me around for using a small portion of the road. Once I was nearly lambasted by a woman who ran a red light - she stopped short of hitting me and blasted her horn for me to get out of the intersection... I had the right of way.

    It's scary crap, but maybe if people actually rode properly motorists would get used to bikes. Probably not.

    I don't even commute to work. I'm just speaking about riding in the city/suburbs through busy sections in general. As if choking on exhaust fumes isn't pleasant enough, you have to fear for your life.

    Sorry for the rant, but it's springtime and bike dweebs are out in droves. What can be done?

  2. #2
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    Police should police idiot cyclists just like they do cars. Cars can't drive the wrong way, can't legally ignore stop signs, etc. So they should get tickets just like cars do.

    As for fearing for your life, it'll never stop. Has nothing to do with anything except your smaller than a car and people just dont care. I was out with my son in the trailer the other day, live in a small town and was in residential heading for bike path.....

    Stupid biatch (in my state anything except hands free is big fine while driving) was texting and driving comes up behind us. I saw her face in her phone so swerved up next to curb, thankfully was missed (my 18mnth old would have been first hit) but i dumped my whole cassette and caught her close enough to get her plates at next yield sign. 5 blocks later she was getting a severe ass chewing by officer (which happened to be one i know personally) and took her dl and such to issue a ticket.

    And we are very cyclist heavy around here. This time of year we are more common that ppl walking/jogging by 10-1.

    Doesn't matter, people with cars just dont care.

  3. #3
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    Do idiot cyclists make me mad?

    Of course.
    Recalculating....

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    Yup, problem is if they stopped idiot cyclists, they'd probably have to stop idiot drivers and then where would we be? Safe, calm and the cops could concentrate on criminals (instead of DBs).

  5. #5
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    Uh wut, you sound pretty ignorant right now. You blame other cyclists because motorists are "bullying" you off the road. Anyone who owns a car and does not own a bike usually won't care too much about another cyclist on the road. Why? Because they can accelerate 8x faster than you ever will, and they might not feel entitled to giving you the right away. Just think of everyone else on the road as another Jeremy Clarkson...

  6. #6
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    People who don't obey the rules make other's lives harder, doesn't matter what vehicle they choose. Inherently some will do anything they can get away with, it's human nature. I often argue that the swift and through enforcement of laws is the best way to bring about change. Be it in behavior or at the voting booths.

    With the system we have in place it seems the best way to truly benefit is to behave in a abiding fashion and campaign for your causes. Contacting the people in charge of the issues that bother you is usually as simple as dialing 311.

  7. #7
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    The only ones that really bug me are salmon. They ride illegally and unsafely expecting me to move left into traffic. I am fortunate that this is rare here. In fact other cyclists are none too common.

  8. #8
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    People who lack the considerate gene can make me angry but my madness is not their fault.

  9. #9
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    Nah - I ain't blaming them for anything but being ignorant and for lack of a better word, wusses. Riding on sidewalks makes cars think bikes belong on sidewalks, which they don't, pedestrians do (hence my comment on idiot drivers blowing their horns at cyclists who ride with traffic). Riding into traffic is just asking to be killed, so when a motorist runs you over, even if it's their fault, you were still increasing your risk 10 fold. Bikers who think they can ignore traffic lights and signs are also asking to be hit, again taking the blame off the motorist in the event of an incident.

    As far as my personal scuffs with DB drivers... that's really a separate rant but I feel like those people think bikes belong on the bike path, and not on the road... so they try to bully you off. Don't believe me, try this experiment. Drive a Mazda Miata around and see how many people cut you off, tailgate you, and pass you aggressively. It's really true. I've owned one for some time. Big cars give people big balls. Imagine how those DBs view cyclists. You're just another bug to squash on their windshield and don't deserve the road.

    Off my original rant topic but here's another one that drives motorists mad: Canoes. Yes, it's true. Put a canoe on the top of your car and people will pass you even if you are going 80. They will tailgate you when they can't pass you going 80. I don't know what it is... if it's the height and they can't see past it, or if they just associate canoes with going slow, but I notice it everytime I put mine on the car.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    The only ones that really bug me are salmon. They ride illegally and unsafely expecting me to move left into traffic. I am fortunate that this is rare here. In fact other cyclists are none too common.
    This. Whether I'm on a bike or in a car, they drive me nuts.

  11. #11
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    Salmon? Guys that want to pass on the right? Sorry, Im not sure what you mean. But passing on the right is a big no no.

    Ive experienced several times other cyclists that are so desperate to "beat" me doing stupid things. Passing cars on the left (as the car is signaling/turning left) is a favorite. The other one is riding on the side walk then jumping out into traffic at a crossing.

    Both are dic*head moves of the highest calibre.

    All it makes me do is drop a gear and stand then pop! There I am drafting them for all theyre worth. Eejits.

  12. #12
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    Salmon = people who ride on the wrong side, in the opposite direction as the traffic. Like fish, swimming upstream.
    Recalculating....

  13. #13
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    I see this with disapointing regularity too.

  14. #14
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    Avid roadie here...follow the rules the best I can. At 6:30 AM I run red lights if nobody is coming/road is empty. Carbon bikes don't trip the light sensors some times. When cars are there, I always stop and follow the rules. Just need to use some common sense. I signal when I am turning. I use f/r blinking lights. Sometimes you have to "take the lane" to make left hand turns even if it pisses off drivers. I have had a few minor issues on the road but for the most part, I try to take the stance "smile and wave". Cars rule the road....its just how it is and you can either accept it and ride or try to play the "we are the same as cars" thing and have issues. I try to ride at off-peak hours and on roads that have enough room.
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  15. #15
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    Salmon... heading up stream to their death... funny in a sad sort of way...

    Yeah - I've broke traffic laws too. On bikes and in cars. It happens. The laws are there for safety. If no one is around, well, then I wouldn't hang you for it...

    I'm talking about blatant wrongdoers. A lot of casual riders I know seem to keep off roads. A lot of the most egregious offenders are ghetto punks on stolen bikes... or clueless middle-aged soccer moms. I'm pretty sure my wife was unaware of bicycle traffic code when she started riding - but I whipped her into shape.

    I prefer to ride on bike paths, trails or back roads but there's just some areas where traffic is unavoidable.

  16. #16
    I'd rather be on my bike
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    My late night commute home has me on a divided road that often has stoplights to allow sidestreet access onto the directional road that I am on. Cars are always turning from the left. If I catch that light at night, and there is no traffic turning, I do not stop since I am in the far right lane. I can easily see if there is anything coming from the left which there usually is not. One light is like that as a turn around for the west bound traffic to access the east bound lane to make a big intersection east of the signal where no turns are allowed. I can easily see that there is nothing there so again I do not stop. My bike also does not trip the left turn signal sensor at another big intersection, so when oncoming traffic clears, I turn left.

    90% of the people I see on bikes here are on the sidewalk, and they are college kids on big box store bikes that are too small for them and the seat is slammed. They are using a bike as basic transportation to get from class to class. The worst part about this is seeing them on the sidewalk avoiding pedestrians and broken pavement while I cruise by in the bike lane doing almost 30 mph. The city built us some really nice bike lanes, and it is a shame to see them not being used. Once you get out on the road and get accustomed to being near traffic it really is not bad. Now riding on the sidewalk seems far more dangerous if you ask me. So many unknowns and alleys and driveways and pedestrians.
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  17. #17
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    Nope.

    I don't worry about the actions of vehicles that move very slowly and weigh very little.

    I have more than enough other concerns on the road.

    Question though: If your local cyclists are a key safely concern, why do you prefer to ride on bike paths.... I mean, aren't those just total mayhem then?
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  18. #18
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    I have no tolerance for people salmoning, and I'll let any person I see doing it know. I make a point to stop at every red light and stop sign, but I don't say anything to those that don't. I just try to set the example. There are some lights that simply won't detect bicycles so after stopping and waiting for traffic to clear I will just go, but there is a provision in the local ordinances here that allows that for cyclists.

    Of course idiot cyclists make me mad, but I also have a problem with anyone that thinks a cyclist breaking the traffic laws is "asking to be hit". It's a bully car mentality that cyclists are allowed to be hit because they rolled a stop sign or ran a red.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    Nope.
    Question though: If your local cyclists are a key safely concern, why do you prefer to ride on bike paths.... I mean, aren't those just total mayhem then?
    Good Question! My observation is that most people on a bike path ride on the right and pass on the left. No idea why that doesn't translate to roads?

    And honestly I don't see a lot of 'salmon' as you guys call them. I think I'm just extra sensitive to them. I'll forget in a few weeks... it's just a springtime annoyance like black flies - they die off eventually, as do the salmon I'm sure. Survival of the fittest is a great law.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    bike paths.... I mean, aren't those just total mayhem then?
    Bike paths are the worst. Absolute chaos.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kleebs View Post
    Of course idiot cyclists make me mad, but I also have a problem with anyone that thinks a cyclist breaking the traffic laws is "asking to be hit". It's a bully car mentality that cyclists are allowed to be hit because they rolled a stop sign or ran a red.
    No I'm a cyclist saying breaking traffic laws is asking to be hit and by that I mean, taking a ridiculous and unnecessary risk. Personally, as the law goes, I don't see much of a difference between a cyclist being hit for running a red as I do a car being hit for the same offense. Obviously from a survival standpoint, I'd take my chances car vs car, rather than bike vs car.

    Also dude, I've been hit by a car and tossed about 30 ft. It sucked. I don't recommend anyone do it. I guess I'm just speaking from experience.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kleebs View Post
    Bike paths are the worst. Absolute chaos.
    No cars on the bike path. I'd rather take my chances being hit by a 200lb cyclist than a 4000lb car. Kinetic energy is a sob.

    But still - they should have a divider and maybe with arrows indicating which way you are supposed to go.

  23. #23
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    Cyclists in traffic owe it to themselves to do a good job of indicating their actions and managing their space. The understanding that they're entitled to anything is foolish. The selfishness grows when riding in packs (as I've experienced myself)...

    My last interaction with a (road) cyclist involved guy who thought he was ok to roll down the middle of the lane, and onto the yellow divider lines without gesturing any signals of any sort. Is this guy nuts? Is this guy retarded? (30KM/H in a 60 KM/H zone). Is he going to ride into oncoming traffic next? All I could gather was that he was well equipped on his carbon bike and had working hands that he could have used to indicate his intentions - but he didn't. The look on his face as I rolled my car into position alongside him while he was riding on the yellow lines was kinda neat.

    IF you don't give a sh!t about the rules of the road, neither will I... Sorry bud, you get what you give...
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  24. #24
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    Salmon bother me. And people riding at night without lights bother me.

    Just last night, for example. I live on a fairly busy street, across the street from a 24hr grocery store. While the street is busy, it's not a bad road to ride on. The lanes are super wide in front of my house, so passing cars can give cyclists plenty of space. Bike lanes start up pretty nearby, also. There's a pretty decent number of cyclists who ride by. Most are folks on bikes because cars are too expensive, though there are a few who ride more expensive bikes, who do so because they like to ride. It's a big bus route, and I frequently see bikes on the bus racks.

    There are no sidewalks, unfortunately, and there are actually quite a lot of pedestrians. Most of whom are headed to/from the bus stops, from what I can tell. They are either out in the street, or well into my yard to avoid the traffic, because there's a drainage ditch along the road.

    I walk to the grocery store frequently. I did last night, around dusk. Car traffic is light at that time, so crossing the street isn't a problem. As I was headed home, I almost walked in front of a guy on a bike, who had no lights. A police car drove past him, without a second glance. It is a state law here that cyclists riding at night are required to have lights. That would have been a good opportunity for the officer to stop the rider and inform him of the law for his own safety, at minimum.

    When I was in grad school, a friend of mine was stopped by an officer for riding in the dark without lights. Just a warning. But he bought lights afterward. That small town in rural east Texas had more visible cyclists (who rode properly) than I've seen anywhere else. Because the police actually took the time to educate people. I'm not sure if they ever wrote tickets for unlit cyclists or not. I did still see unlit cyclists, especially farther from campus. But I saw plenty of riders who used more lights than minimally required, and had fun with their lights.

    I don't have any inherent problems with riders on the sidewalk in general. I do see a problem with faster transportation-oriented riding on sidewalks. That sort of riding should be done in the street. Slower riders and families and such, I think, are better off on sidewalks, because they're moving much closer to the speed of pedestrians that folks expect to see on sidewalks. And part of that depends on sidewalk width, too. Near my house there's a super busy 7 lane road that becomes a freeway about a mile south of my house. The sidewalk on the east side of that road for a few miles was upgraded last summer. The old sidewalk was pretty narrow, and from what I can tell, the city at least doubled the width of it. It's not quite as wide as a whole MUP, but it's more than half as wide. Since the upgrade was done, I see quite a few more people using it, including families with kids on bikes (it's set back pretty far from the busy road, actually) and the slower basic transportation rider. I'm glad to see it being used, really.

    Some parts of town are getting side paths that are just as wide as any MUP. They're clearly intended for cyclists to use. I'm not exactly sure what I think about those. Definitely they're good for slow riders who are intimidated by car traffic in the street, families with kids, etc. I use some of them at times. Especially when I slow down a bit. I don't like using sections with frequent driveway crossings, though, where there are many houses along the road. In areas where the side path circles subdivisions, though, and the only crossing point is the single entrance to the subdivision, I have less of a problem.

    What really gets me are the people who salmon ride in the bike lane, when the backside of the bike lane signs have "wrong way" signs for bikes. those folks aren't just oblivious or ignorant. They're blatantly disregarding instructions. They're probably uncomfortable riding with traffic, which is a problem that needs addressing. Not just with enforcement, but definitely including it.

  25. #25
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    Yes, I see many during the day tearing across open grass spaces, going too fast on the sidewalk (it farkin' has walk in the name for crying out loud), riding down wrong way on streets, not riding close to the curb, basically not giving a hoot but for themselves and thinking being on a bicycle gives them the right of way no matter the situation. Frustrating to say the least since it appears we are all judged by their inconsiderate behavior. It really bothers me to the point I've confronted a few, who of course don't listen and get pissed you called them out for their behavior so the effort is for naught.

    Nothing common about common sense unfortunately.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by l'oiseau View Post
    No cars on the bike path. I'd rather take my chances being hit by a 200lb cyclist than a 4000lb car. Kinetic energy is a sob.

    But still - they should have a divider and maybe with arrows indicating which way you are supposed to go.
    There's also no families walking 4 abreast on the road, or dog leashes stretched across the road, or (for the most part) joggers with earbuds oblivious to the world. Obviously being hit by a car will be much more serious than running into a jogger or colliding with another cyclist, but the likelihood of an incident on a bike path seems an awful lot higher than on the road, assuming you are cycling responsibly.

    I do recognize that for some people, the bike path or sidewalk is the right place to ride. For others the road is the right place to ride. Personally, I'd rather avoid the bike path. It's not safe for other bike path users to have cyclists riding by at 20 mph.

    Quote Originally Posted by l'oiseau View Post
    No I'm a cyclist saying breaking traffic laws is asking to be hit and by that I mean, taking a ridiculous and unnecessary risk.
    When I hear "asking for it", that to me removes any responsibility from the driver to do their best to avoid a collision, and that's the part I have a problem with. Is running red lights or stop signs dumb? Yep. Is it a ridiculous and unnecessary risk? Yep. As a motorist should I do everything in my power to not plow into that cyclist that just broke the rules? Yep. It's part of the responsibility of operating a 4000 lb machine that is capable of easily killing vulnerable road users.

    Maybe I'm just being sensitive and letting my bike advocacy lens color how I see this conversation.

    Quote Originally Posted by -Todd- View Post
    Cyclists in traffic owe it to themselves to do a good job of indicating their actions and managing their space.
    I totally agree with this.

    Quote Originally Posted by -Todd- View Post
    IF you don't give a sh!t about the rules of the road, neither will I... Sorry bud, you get what you give...
    What a thoughtful and mature response.

  27. #27
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    I just dislike idiots in general.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kleebs View Post
    When I hear "asking for it", that to me removes any responsibility from the driver to do their best to avoid a collision, and that's the part I have a problem with. Is running red lights or stop signs dumb? Yep. Is it a ridiculous and unnecessary risk? Yep. As a motorist should I do everything in my power to not plow into that cyclist that just broke the rules? Yep. It's part of the responsibility of operating a 4000 lb machine that is capable of easily killing vulnerable road users.

    Maybe I'm just being sensitive and letting my bike advocacy lens color how I see this conversation.
    Whelp... I git yer point, and I'm all for people being in control of their vehicles, but we all know how it goes when we rely on other people to do what they are supposed to... my gripe is a perfect example, is it not?

    And perfectly safe and responsible motorists will kill you just as easily as the maniacs if you put yourself in a bad situation, or an accident happens, and by that I mean someone effed up.

    I think you are def being a bit sensitive to this - I'm not advocating the cyclist or motorist, I'm griping about cyclists who do not follow a simple set of rules. I'm not saying they deserve to be hurt, I'm saying they are asking for it in the same way as I'd say you are "asking for it" doing backflips down the rifle range or poking a Grizzly bearing with a salmon in your pocket. "Asking for it" implies you are asking for trouble, not that you deserve to be punished or hurt for being foolish.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by l'oiseau View Post
    Whelp... I git yer point, and I'm all for people being in control of their vehicles, but we all know how it goes when we rely on other people to do what they are supposed to
    Fair enough.

  30. #30
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    I'm often in the car with my wife saying "did you see that guy?? Wrong way, no helmet, riding on the sidewalk..." etc, etc. Because my brain is programmed to think that way (I'm a rule-following, vehicle code memorizing, daily cyclist). She doesn't even see them most of the time. I think most drivers can discern a "real" cyclist doing the "real" cycling thing from a "pedestrian on a bike" without even thinking about it, but they don't know that's what they're doing. What bugs me about the whole thing is that it gives some people the idea that the "get on the sidewalk" mentality is appropriate and acceptable (even though it would be illegal for us to do).

    But I want to think that on some level, most people get it. Us "real" cyclists will be sharing the roads and following the rules, and the pedestrians on bikes won't. I like to think that they're not giving me a bad name, because in some deep, dark corner of the brain, most drivers know that those guys are not real cyclists
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    I'm often in the car with my wife saying "did you see that guy?? Wrong way, no helmet, riding on the sidewalk..." etc, etc. Because my brain is programmed to think that way (I'm a rule-following, vehicle code memorizing, daily cyclist).
    I do the same thing, but I don't know that I'm a militant rule follower... I think I can just understand why those things are wrong.

    Wrong way - easy. Think for 2 seconds. Imagine going 30 mph head to head with a car and how you might go flailing through the air. Then imagine going 30 mph in the same direction i.e. zero relative velocity, and getting bumped by a motor vehicle. If you passed HS physics it should be easy to figure out.

    Helmet - lots of people oppose these. I gashed my head open summer vacation before Jr high not wearing a helmet... lesson learned.

    Riding on sidewalks - this is hard for people to understand. I'm not sure why, but I think it's just part of the mentality that these people think that bikes don't belong on roads. They are probably the same people that honk and wave at cyclists merging to make left turns, etc...


    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    She doesn't even see them most of the time. I think most drivers can discern a "real" cyclist doing the "real" cycling thing from a "pedestrian on a bike" without even thinking about it, but they don't know that's what they're doing. What bugs me about the whole thing is that it gives some people the idea that the "get on the sidewalk" mentality is appropriate and acceptable (even though it would be illegal for us to do).
    Yes - and I'm not sure where they learned this. It should be a course in high school like sex ed. It's a serious problem.

    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    But I want to think that on some level, most people get it. Us "real" cyclists will be sharing the roads and following the rules, and the pedestrians on bikes won't. I like to think that they're not giving me a bad name, because in some deep, dark corner of the brain, most drivers know that those guys are not real cyclists
    I don't think they do. I think they are just ignorant of how bikes fit into society.

    I could on about the same stuff from the trail side of things and how hikers view the evil bikes.

    I'm not really sure how all this happened? Environmentalists don't want bikes in the wild, and suburbanites want to run them off the road yet it's like one the most popular and least offensive forms of travel and recreation.

  32. #32
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    "Idiot" cyclists make me mad, sure. But I see plenty of very serious looking cyclists on very nice bikes who make me more mad than the average joe on a dep't store bike. You know, in full team kits, usually riding with several others 3+ across, running lights, taking up full turn lanes and flipping people off.

    Maybe these types make me more mad because I think they should know better!
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tystevens View Post
    "Idiot" cyclists make me mad, sure. But I see plenty of very serious looking cyclists on very nice bikes who make me more mad than the average joe on a dep't store bike. You know, in full team kits, usually riding with several others 3+ across, running lights, taking up full turn lanes and flipping people off.

    Maybe these types make me more mad because I think they should know better!
    Still idiots in my book.

    We have a 15 mph limit on our multi use trails. Truth be told, I can't manage much more than that anymore anyway. But, I do get my share of cyclists who blow by thinking they're in some sort of tour. Or those riding two abreast and going uber slow. Then there are the pedestrians walking four abreast so engaged in their chit chat that they can't hear my repeated warnings.

    All fall in the same category in my book.

    Luckily, it seems 98% of those peds, bikers, motorists I encounter daily are not. Most are pretty considerate. But it only takes one to ruin your day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TenSpeed View Post
    90% of the people I see on bikes here are on the sidewalk, and they are college kids on big box store bikes that are too small for them and the seat is slammed. They are using a bike as basic transportation to get from class to class. The worst part about this is seeing them on the sidewalk avoiding pedestrians and broken pavement while I cruise by in the bike lane doing almost 30 mph. The city built us some really nice bike lanes, and it is a shame to see them not being used. Once you get out on the road and get accustomed to being near traffic it really is not bad.
    ^This. Drives me. Crazy. But not as much as a friend of mine, who is basically a roadie, that got tired of the narrow urban road commuting in traffic (the roads suck here) and started using his MTB on the cycle paths (pretty decent network, though a bit run-down) for comfort and safety (and also to save his carbon rims, I'm guessing). He then decided that the opposite sidewalk was much better (TBH it is at least 15 feet wide throughout) since it didn't have bus stops so pedestrians didn't queue up in the paths (this is true). Since he was now actually using his hardtail much more often, he sold it along with his now unused flatbar roadhybrid and of course got a brand new carbon one, 'cause, you know, carbon. So while he's not an everyday commuter, he'll commute every so often ostensibly for a five mile stretch each way on the opposite sidewalk on his $5k carbon hardtail.

    I've tried to talk him out of it repeatedly and unsuccessfully. See, I kind-of get the beautiful godzillas pootling past on the sidewalks one street over from the aforementioned cycle lanes. I even sort-of understand the messengers salmoning past on some steep car-free road. I struggle a little bit more to comprehend the risk calculus behind the roadies cutting through two way traffic downhill between hairpins right at the center line. Different degrees of annoying, but OK, I'll grind my teeth and get on with it. But while I've never seen him do it, but it would drive me absolutely crazy if I was walking and saw him whizz by at 20mph. Again, never really seen him or anyone else do this but it just seems like the worst idea ever. I like to think he's trolling me because he knows me and he's actually using the cycle lanes. It's the only way I can sleep at night (obviously being hyperbolic here).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ghost_HTX View Post
    All it makes me do is drop a gear and stand then pop! There I am drafting them for all theyre worth. Eejits.
    Hopping on a wheel without knowing who's wheel you hopping onto (or letting them know you are there) is pretty risky. I'm amazed that people do it as often as they do.

    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo View Post
    Carbon bikes don't trip the light sensors some times.
    An aside but it's the metal in the rim not the frame that trips the light. If you've got carbon wheels you'll never trip the light. That is unless it's a video activated light in which case the bike/rim material makes no difference.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kleebs View Post
    Bike paths are the worst. Absolute chaos.
    I don't know, I ride a bike path through a major University in my daily commute and I rarely have any issues.

    Quote Originally Posted by dbhammercycle View Post
    Nothing common about common sense unfortunately.
    ^^^ This. There is an endless supply of idiots. Just relax and enjoy your ride.

  37. #37
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    ^ Traffic light road sensors are often not picking up Harleys. Indiana passed a law allowing cyclists and motorcyclists to proceed as if it was a stop sign after waiting two minutes. Of course if no cops are in sight, time seems to fly…

    I have to remind myself that in spite of trying to drive and ride safely and within the law, I have screwed up sometimes. Nothing as bad as most I see others do, but to err is human, bit since I am no God, I have trouble with the forgiving and being devine.

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    Hey woodway - I let them know I'm there. I also keep my wits about me - never overlap and look beyond the rider in front (as well as looking out for the guy in front making any idiot moves).

    Not tooting my own horn but if they are worth me drafting them then they are going pretty fast and most likely have a bit of riding experience. If they look sketchy I play it safe and let them go or pass them - which ever is most expedient (and depending on how my legs are). I get dropped now and then but that's part of it - if you want to get better, try to keep up with guys that can drop you.

    It has happened a couple times where the guy in front has stopped and waved my by only to end up drafting me instead - usually guys on super bling road bikes. Don't want to chance riding with strangers but are riding the same direction at the same pace... Funny story - my father in law got a good lecturing from a roadie on his most recent ride out. He rides a Ghost hard-tail (much like mine only nicer) and his usual route takes him 80km over road/gravel/logging roads/gravel/road again and home. On his return leg he caught up to a guy on a nice road bike - he looked handy, my father in law said (and since he used to race at a fairly high level I assume he knows what he's on about). My FIL then calls out "hello" and sits in behind him. Normally (in Norway at least) this is fine but this guy was really pissy about it - he absolutely didn't want company and in no uncertain terms asked my FIL to be on his way... Only to catch up and draft him again himself!

    My take on it is that if you don't want to share the road, go train on a stationary trainer. Be safe, of course, but be social. Don't be a d*ck about it if you end up riding in close proximity to others.

  39. #39
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    I see some comments grouping "taking a full lane" with ills like blowing red lights, etc.

    Whats up with that? Do you guys have local traffic prohibitions against using a lane?
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  40. #40
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    When I am on commuting or riding on the road, I take the lane. Riding near the curb is unsafe due to road conditions, debris, and giving someone the opportunity to squeeze you out. If you don't give them room, they won't try to take it from you. I ride approximately where the passenger side tires would be in the lane, just slightly left of that. I run a blinker regardless of the conditions, sunny or dark, and make sure that I am fairly visible.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    I see some comments grouping "taking a full lane" with ills like blowing red lights, etc.

    Whats up with that? Do you guys have local traffic prohibitions against using a lane?
    Around here you have to ride to the right as is resonably practicable.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post

    I have to remind myself that in spite of trying to drive and ride safely and within the law, I have screwed up sometimes. Nothing as bad as most I see others do, but to err is human, bit since I am no God, I have trouble with the forgiving and being devine.
    Remember when you were a kid and would do silly, sometimes stupid, things to see what you could get away with? It's natural, your just trying to find your boundaries. These boundaries are usually defined by some sort of negative reinforcement like pain, fear, embarrassment, or, more often then not, getting in trouble.

    As an adult your not much different, it's human nature, but in a modern car where you have driving aids, air bags, crumple zones, sound insulation, tinted glass, and not to mention MANY distractions, there is much less motivations, in a primal sense, to keep you from doing silly things. Your not likely to get seriously injured, or killed. It fairly hard for someone recognize you, let alone have the opportunity to share their distaste for your actions, if they care at all. So when it comes down to it you still need that parental figure to slap you on the wrist and check your behavior. But if the enforcement lacks we all but remove the motivation to strive to be better.

    I feel this attitude is very clearly shown in the actions of road users today. They will do the minimum they can to avoid personal hardship and damn the rest.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    Around here you have to ride to the right as is resonably practicable.
    Which in a legal sense simple means "use as much as you think you need to be safe". Obviously your actions could questioned by law enforcement, that's there job, but if you were actually in the right can only be decided by due process.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    I see some comments grouping "taking a full lane" with ills like blowing red lights, etc.

    Whats up with that? Do you guys have local traffic prohibitions against using a lane?
    I noticed the same.

    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    Around here you have to ride to the right as is resonably practicable.
    That does NOT mean ride as far to the right as POSSIBLE ALL THE TIME.

    Quote Originally Posted by big_papa_nuts View Post
    Which in a legal sense simple means "use as much as you think you need to be safe". Obviously your actions could questioned by law enforcement, that's there job, but if you were actually in the right can only be decided by due process.
    Right. Bikes MAY ALSO USE THE FULL LANE. At intersections, unless I am given my own space, I USE THE FULL LANE. Going straight, you betcha. In fact, most of the bike lanes here go away at intersections entirely, which definitely encourages using the full lane at intersections. I also use turn lanes. Both right turn and left turn lanes. The bike lane doesn't have a left turn lane, so if I want to turn left, my options are to cross on the crosswalks or to use the left turn lane. The left turn lane is far quicker most of the time. At other times, it depends. If the road is crap, I'm using the full lane. If the lane is really narrow, I use the full lane. If the lane is wide enough to give me my space AND allow for safe passing, then I'm over to the right to allow passing within the lane. Under zero circumstances will I ride my bike on the paint or in a shoulder riddled with broken glass. I don't care if roadies ride two or three or four abreast. I have to make a safe pass anyway. The vast majority of the time that means I make a full lane change regardless.

    Where I live, it is NOT illegal to ride on the sidewalk. Most sidewalks suck for the purpose if you are actually trying to go somewhere in a reasonable amount of time, but there is nothing legally wrong with it.

  45. #45
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    Indeed, when I use a full lane I expect to get crap from irate motorists, and I suppose you also might get it from cops like, say, this guy.

    But it seems like after 20 years of discussion on the internet, we still have half the cyclists saying "take the lane" and half grouping lane-takers with scofflaws.
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    At an intersection? I say take the lane - better they see you and where you are going to go rather than get sideswiped.

    Once you make your turn, or get through, get over.

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    ^ In taking the center of a right or left turn lane where there is no room for a car to pass without either interfering unsafely with you or the other lane of traffic or passing you in the intersection itself a highly illegal move, the "reasonably practicable" of taking the lane should be self evident. What is a second or so delay for a following motorist compared to maiming or death and all the delay an accident causes?

    I have had only one idiot in decades of cycling make an issue of this short delay by honking and yelling at me. He had time to argue about my use of the middle finger after he almost hit me passing in the intersection and then waving snottily about it (that is what resulted in my Italian Salute). He has no time to be safe and pass a second later, but could afford a roadside chat. Go figure. I guess he did not like being called on it. He came close to losing his teeth when he threatened to beat me up, when I had him by 50 pounds and 5 inches of reach. Could easily have provoked him into the first punch. I just folded my moderately beefy arms across my barrel chest, and flatly said that I did not envy his chances, if he tried. He saw the wisdom of that. So not a complete idiot.

    The "Are you drunk? question might have helped me to divert him so we could discuss how unreasonable it was to be upset about a bit of delay through the intersection until he could pass safely when he had clearly had time enough to kill for this discussion.

    So we have one self centered short-syndrome man in what? 10's of thousands? maybe 100's of thousands? of drivers. A real outlier AKA a complete jerk. So some may grumble but most get why you are taking the lane.

  48. #48
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    Can I just say that I'm a big fan of having this discussion? Its something that needs to be talked about more often.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ghost_HTX View Post
    Hey woodway - I let them know I'm there. I also keep my wits about me - never overlap and look beyond the rider in front (as well as looking out for the guy in front making any idiot moves).

    Not tooting my own horn but if they are worth me drafting them then they are going pretty fast and most likely have a bit of riding experience. If they look sketchy I play it safe and let them go or pass them - which ever is most expedient (and depending on how my legs are). I get dropped now and then but that's part of it - if you want to get better, try to keep up with guys that can drop you.

    It has happened a couple times where the guy in front has stopped and waved my by only to end up drafting me instead - usually guys on super bling road bikes. Don't want to chance riding with strangers but are riding the same direction at the same pace... Funny story - my father in law got a good lecturing from a roadie on his most recent ride out. He rides a Ghost hard-tail (much like mine only nicer) and his usual route takes him 80km over road/gravel/logging roads/gravel/road again and home. On his return leg he caught up to a guy on a nice road bike - he looked handy, my father in law said (and since he used to race at a fairly high level I assume he knows what he's on about). My FIL then calls out "hello" and sits in behind him. Normally (in Norway at least) this is fine but this guy was really pissy about it - he absolutely didn't want company and in no uncertain terms asked my FIL to be on his way... Only to catch up and draft him again himself!

    My take on it is that if you don't want to share the road, go train on a stationary trainer. Be safe, of course, but be social. Don't be a d*ck about it if you end up riding in close proximity to others.
    Drafting strangers, not. Don't want some idiot on my ass. I usually only ride road to commute.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by l'oiseau View Post
    At an intersection? I say take the lane - better they see you and where you are going to go rather than get sideswiped.

    Once you make your turn, or get through, get over.
    Here in MA, bikes have the same rules, rights and responsibilities as the cars. I take the lane when needed. The road that leads up to my street, is like a cow path. A an old section of a suburban town, single lane and twisty. 20-25 mph and signed that way. Some parts are not even 8' wide, no sidewalk. The middle of the lane is safest for me. They can either pass or wait. Not enough room for a car and a bike to share the same lane. YRMV

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    Yeah I guess I was assuming there was a 'bike' lane or shoulder when I said move over after the intersection...

    Some roads here don't even have a shoulder, it's just a hard curb. Eff that, take the lane... you don't want be pressed between a 6" high, sharp curb and monster SUV that can barely fit in the lane.

    I try to avoid those roads, because it's not a pleasant experience... YMMV.

  52. #52
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    All idiots make people upset. Not sure where you're going with this. Going to enjoy some popcorn and watch the show.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod View Post
    All idiots make people upset. Not sure where you're going with this. Going to enjoy some popcorn and watch the show.
    Unless you are an idiot?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod View Post
    All idiots make people upset. Not sure where you're going with this. Going to enjoy some popcorn and watch the show.
    The day an actual, real life problem gets solved via an internet forum will be the day your question get's answered.

    Until then, enjoy the popcorn.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    Unless you are an idiot?
    I'm not sure if idiots make other idiots upset. I would like to assume I'm out of that group, but I may or may not be included.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Kleebs View Post
    There's also no families walking 4 abreast on the road, or dog leashes stretched across the road, or (for the most part) joggers with earbuds oblivious to the world. Obviously being hit by a car will be much more serious than running into a jogger or colliding with another cyclist, but the likelihood of an incident on a bike path seems an awful lot higher than on the road, assuming you are cycling responsibly.
    Here in MadTown, there's tons of bike infrastructure. On my commute I have 4 miles of road, 4 miles of (full lane wide!) bike lane and 4 miles of multiuse path. There's a big biking community here and drivers are generally quite cognizant and polite.

    Pedestrians on the MUP are by far the biggest problem. Two things I've seen in the past couple of weeks that almost got me off my bike and in someone's face:

    1) Dude on a bike "walking" his dog. Leash around left wrist in the pedestrian lane of the MUP. This part of the MUP has no access to grass, it is between a building and a lake. Dog has nowhere to move accept into bike traffic. Genius really. Dog is probably smarter.

    2) Last night a student couple with two brand new puppies. The dogs are running free next to and on the MUP, it is about 5:45 PM full rush hour. There are serious bikers out doing upwards of 20 miles per hour. A guy walks up to me at the next light and says, "A bike is gonna make a mess out of one of those puppies", no doubt.

    Why am I put into a position of potentially harming a dog, just because it's owner is a moron. Honestly I should have had a chat with these folks. Someone is going to have a serious crash.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by l'oiseau View Post
    Yeah I guess I was assuming there was a 'bike' lane or shoulder when I said move over after the intersection...

    Some roads here don't even have a shoulder, it's just a hard curb. Eff that, take the lane... you don't want be pressed between a 6" high, sharp curb and monster SUV that can barely fit in the lane.

    I try to avoid those roads, because it's not a pleasant experience... YMMV.
    Can't assume anything. When I ride, things I don't even notice in my car become serious issues. Plus, I am looking well ahead and planning for turns, upcoming roadside parking, and so on, that drivers rarely pay attention to.

  58. #58
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    ^ Yes. And vehicles not signaling or late in signalling make that planning all the more difficult. My defensive riding carries over to the car. I have avoided at least two serious accidents from being attentive to mere twitches from other vehicles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod View Post
    All idiots make people upset. Not sure where you're going with this. Going to enjoy some popcorn and watch the show.
    Glad you wrote this, given I was wondering how the bike under the idiot was the point.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc View Post
    ^ Yes. And vehicles not signaling or late in signalling make that planning all the more difficult. My defensive riding carries over to the car. I have avoided at least two serious accidents from being attentive to mere twitches from other vehicles.
    me too. One really potentially nasty one I avoided was on the interstate through rural Arkansas. Pickup truck passed me and I noticed one of its wheels was super wobbly. Sure enough, right after he moved over into my lane ahead of me, that tire blew. Fraction of a second, and I had large pieces of flying rubber debris headed right for my windshield. I executed a dodge at 70mph that saved my bacon. I stopped to see if the pickup driver needed any help, but he was fine and had called for roadside assistance already. But dang.

    I was thinking about this discussion today on my ride. I rode to a local farmer's market to do some education and outreach. About half of my 12mi route was on a fairly busy urban/suburban road. It became more dense as I rode towards downtown, but I turned off onto a MUP just prior to reaching downtown. The road is kinda all over the place. Two straight lanes with a center turn lane and sharrows for bikes. Two straight lanes with no center turn lane and bike lanes. Two straight lanes, multiple turn lanes, and sharrows for bikes. No markings for bikes whatsoever. Road construction that looks like part that was two lanes each way is being converted to two straight lanes, a center turn lane, and bike lanes, and part will not receive changes to the painting. That all happens in a two mile stretch. Further down the road, there are sections where on-street parking is permitted part of the time, but rarely used.

    In short, I was all over the place. But ya know what, I got ZERO honks or yells, and only one or two passes a little close for comfort. My hand signal vocabulary got a serious workout today, and that's a HUGE part of it. If there were two straight lanes going the same direction, I just took the right lane. If there was a change in conditions that forced me into the other lane, hand signal. And you know what, the drivers respected it. I hesitated a good bit every time because I expected them not to. But they did. And let me in.

    I think the other thing that helped a lot was the fact that I saw quite a few other people on bikes all along the 6 mile stretch of road. Drivers just expect there to be bikes in the area. I certainly won't say they were all hand signaling the way I was. I didn't see another hand signal at all. But what I didn't see were any drivers treating those riders any differently than me.

    The MUP was a little different. On my ride in, it was nearly empty, because it was early enough. Cool and nice out, too. On my way home, it was a bit more crowded. Thankfully not too bad. I did see some dogs on flexi leashes. I saw a group of about half a dozen peds taking up the entire path (they did clear out when they saw me approach). Finally I saw a tool in a Mellow Johnny's kit hauling along on a tri bike.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by l'oiseau View Post
    The day an actual, real life problem gets solved via an internet forum will be the day your question get's answered.

    Until then, enjoy the popcorn.
    Lol! Well said


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    Yep. A few days ago I was waiting at an intersection when a guy on a bike came up next to me. Instead of waiting for traffic he rode in the bike lane in the wrong direction, waited for a tiny gap in traffic and darted across. I waited 10 more seconds for the traffic to stop, properly crossed the intersection, and met up with the guy about a minute later. What a douche I thought, who is in such a hurry that they have to cut through traffic and ride on the wrong side of the road, only to be passed a minute later by a law abiding respectful cyclist?

    Even in a VERY bike friendly town (Fort Collins) and riding responsibly and defensively, I still get passed by idiot drivers, cutting into the bike lane, turning in front of me instead of waiting 5 extra seconds. I try my best to ride only on bike paths.
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    Drafting strangers, not. Don't want some idiot on my ass. I usually only ride road to commute.
    I have to ask; what would you do if someone was behind you, then? If they announced they were there? Would you tell them to pass? Try and drop them? Stop and let them go? Give them a lecture about not riding too close to you in future?

    If you live somewhere that has masses of open road and not a lot of riders then this is applicable.

    If you try to call out everyone that rides within 3 feet of you where I live (Oslo, Norway) then you are most likely going to end up in a fight on a more or less weekly basis, or be forced to ride at a snails pace to let these guys get past you, or ride your legs into the ground trying to drop people all the time. None of which will make you any friends. It just isn't possible to ride solo at peak times when commuting where I commute. Especially now that the weather is turning toward summer I find myself riding (commuting) in bunches with 2-3 often upwards of five-six (sometimes more) total strangers at reasonably high speed (my average speed on my commute lately has been hovering around 25kph+) with no problems at all. If someone wants to draft me then all power to them - just pay attention! I've commuted the same route for going on 6 years now without any issue relating to this (either me drafting people or people hitching themselves to me) so I just don't get the precious attitude.

    Ok - I tell a lie - I've had one roadie that I was behind (and he knew I was there - I announced myself) sling his bike backwards into my front wheel when he was standing up to kick - but this was a non - issue; we touched wheels, no one even as much as wobbled, I said sorry - he said sorry and we laughed about it and were on our way. This is one incident in almost 6 years of commuting.

    So why not be a little social about the whole thing? Tell the guy behind you to pay attention and maybe point out the up coming obstacles etc? I'm not talking about out on the trail here - I mean on the road, of course.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ghost_HTX View Post
    I have to ask; what would you do if someone was behind you, then? If they announced they were there? Would you tell them to pass? Try and drop them? Stop and let them go? Give them a lecture about not riding too close to you in future?

    If you live somewhere that has masses of open road and not a lot of riders then this is applicable.

    If you try to call out everyone that rides within 3 feet of you where I live (Oslo, Norway) then you are most likely going to end up in a fight on a more or less weekly basis, or be forced to ride at a snails pace to let these guys get past you, or ride your legs into the ground trying to drop people all the time. None of which will make you any friends. It just isn't possible to ride solo at peak times when commuting where I commute. Especially now that the weather is turning toward summer I find myself riding (commuting) in bunches with 2-3 often upwards of five-six (sometimes more) total strangers at reasonably high speed (my average speed on my commute lately has been hovering around 25kph+) with no problems at all. If someone wants to draft me then all power to them - just pay attention! I've commuted the same route for going on 6 years now without any issue relating to this (either me drafting people or people hitching themselves to me) so I just don't get the precious attitude.

    Ok - I tell a lie - I've had one roadie that I was behind (and he knew I was there - I announced myself) sling his bike backwards into my front wheel when he was standing up to kick - but this was a non - issue; we touched wheels, no one even as much as wobbled, I said sorry - he said sorry and we laughed about it and were on our way. This is one incident in almost 6 years of commuting.

    So why not be a little social about the whole thing? Tell the guy behind you to pay attention and maybe point out the up coming obstacles etc? I'm not talking about out on the trail here - I mean on the road, of course.
    I'm commuting, not racing on side roads with few bikers. Using my mirror, I usually push the pace or just wave them by. Someone who tries to stealth draft is getting a snot rocket. I don't want some idiot behind me or need to worry about what they are doing. On the MUP people space out some, no need to be crowded. On the roads I may go by maybe 2-4 people on my 18 miles, more on the MUP. The roadies just go by me, I announce passing left or a " good morning" to the few I may pass. It is great you have such a popular biking culture where you live. Closer to Boston, MA biking is becoming more popular, not so much in the suburbs. Like I said, I'm not racing, don't do packs, groups, lines, formations, or drafting when I commute. Cheers.

  65. #65
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    Idiots in general, they don't have to be on a bicycle.
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  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ghost_HTX View Post
    I have to ask; what would you do if someone was behind you, then? If they announced they were there? Would you tell them to pass? Try and drop them? Stop and let them go? Give them a lecture about not riding too close to you in future?
    Well, I wouldn't blow a snot rocket if I knew they were there, for one. I did this a couple years ago, some guy had some up on my wheel and I had no idea. He wasn't too happy, but I told him sorry, I truly didn't know he was back there.

    At least on my commute, it is pretty rare to have someone hop on my wheel -- only happens maybe every few months. I don't want to swerve or slow or do anything to cause them harm when a simple "on your wheel ... how's it going" solves a lot of problems.
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  67. #67
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    While I don't put them in the idiot category, I dislike tailgaters on the bike for the same reason I dislike tailgaters in my car - accidents are more likely. And on a bike, if you take me down, I might get run over.

  68. #68
    Wierdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ghost_HTX View Post
    I have to ask; what would you do if someone was behind you, then? If they announced they were there? Would you tell them to pass? Try and drop them? Stop and let them go? Give them a lecture about not riding too close to you in future?
    I hate wheelsuckers - just don't want to think about anyone behind me. I either wave them by or ask them to back off 20-30 feet. Most people have no problem with that.

    If they won't pass or back off I just slow down and let them get out in front of me and them I resume.

  69. #69
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    I hate probably 80% of the other cyclists on the road because they are either hipsters or drunks who don't follow the rules of the road and create mayhem. I've noticed cars seem to be confused by me following the law and the best reason I can think of is almost no other bike they see behaves this way. Salmoning seems to be the domain of the guys who are on bikes because they can't afford them/lost their license. The hipsters seem to enjoy running lights and switching from street to sidewalk. Both groups seem to hate any sort of lighting.

  70. #70
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    I don't know why but I have wheelsuckers (not friends cycling with me) I have the impression I am tiring out...Maybe its just psychological

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by KentheKona View Post
    Both groups seem to hate any sort of lighting.
    It's 6 weeks until winter solstice here and I was just despairing over all the over the top lighting I just saw, all these people with bright flashing lights demanding attention blocks away distract from the closer important stuff.

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    While I don't put them in the idiot category, I dislike tailgaters on the bike for the same reason I dislike tailgaters in my car - accidents are more likely. And on a bike, if you take me down, I might get run over.
    Well said.

  73. #73
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    The ones that ride on the white line that indicates the bike lane drive me nuts! I can only speculate on their thought process, "Oh, we have this nice wide lane for bikes? I'm gonna ride on the white line just to irritate motorists because I'm THAT guy!"

    I'm just going to start handing these out, lol!
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  74. #74
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    ^ If the door zone overlaps that far, OK. But otherwise, it has to be that guy!

  75. #75
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    Hmmm - Im assuming the vast majority of you guys are from the USA\Canada? Im a Scotsman living in Norway so maybe the aversion to taking the wheel is a cultural thing that I shall take note of and NEVER do should I cycle in the Northern Americas...

  76. #76
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    My idiot encounter of the day:

    I'm riding on an MUP that is parallel and about 10 ft off the road and I "pass" this guy who's riding on the road. He tried to Cat 6 it and in the process ran 3 stop signs and at best pulled even with me before having to get on the MUP behind me anyway because the road ended.
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  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ghost_HTX View Post
    Hmmm - Im assuming the vast majority of you guys are from the USA\Canada? Im a Scotsman living in Norway so maybe the aversion to taking the wheel is a cultural thing that I shall take note of and NEVER do should I cycle in the Northern Americas...
    Happens all the time over here...well at least in canada.....lots of fun to be had...

    Just have to talk and be friendly.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    While I don't put them in the idiot category, I dislike tailgaters on the bike for the same reason I dislike tailgaters in my car - accidents are more likely. And on a bike, if you take me down, I might get run over.

    The more you do it the more you will like it....

    nothing better than a 7 km pull with another biker...drafting all the way back and forth..

    When you finally split....it was a great pull.

    Granted first time you might be a little nervous....all you have to do is slow down, to your original speed and it will break up right away.

    Geez I have been in trains of three or four....no one knows anyone.

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tystevens View Post
    Well, I wouldn't blow a snot rocket if I knew they were there, for one. I did this a couple years ago, some guy had some up on my wheel and I had no idea. He wasn't too happy, but I told him sorry, I truly didn't know he was back there.

    At least on my commute, it is pretty rare to have someone hop on my wheel -- only happens maybe every few months. I don't want to swerve or slow or do anything to cause them harm when a simple "on your wheel ... how's it going" solves a lot of problems.
    Yup i have snot rocketed people and been snot rocketed.....never by intention....would never do it intentionally.

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shayne View Post
    My idiot encounter of the day:

    I'm riding on an MUP that is parallel and about 10 ft off the road and I "pass" this guy who's riding on the road. He tried to Cat 6 it and in the process ran 3 stop signs and at best pulled even with me before having to get on the MUP behind me anyway because the road ended.
    Should have been on the MUP so you both could have drafted.

  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ghost_HTX View Post
    Hmmm - Im assuming the vast majority of you guys are from the USA\Canada? Im a Scotsman living in Norway so maybe the aversion to taking the wheel is a cultural thing that I shall take note of and NEVER do should I cycle in the Northern Americas...
    No, no, it's fine to do in North America as long as you give the courtesy of ASKING if it's OK before you hop onto the wheel.

  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodway View Post
    No, no, it's fine to do in North America as long as you give the courtesy of ASKING if it's OK before you hop onto the wheel.
    Doesnt work to well that way.....Some guy is chasing me and I don't even know it...

    He wacks out to catch me......I dont mind if he sits on my wheel till he catches enough breathe...to say hi...

    Heck I dont even mind if when he catches his breathe he passes me....then it is up to me to engage or not....

    So lots of times not much gets said.

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