Design your Perfect Commuter- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Design your Perfect Commuter

    For me:

    Aluminum frame and fork.
    Nice Brooks saddle.
    Full fenders (aluminum or heavy plastic).
    Front rack, rear rack with Pannier option.
    Integrated generator front hub and powered lights.
    Disc brakes. (Preferably Hydraulic, just because they feel better)
    Belt drive and a Rohloff internal hub.
    A set of combination pedals (one side platform, one side Shimano clipless.
    Flat black paint.
    Probably a set of Big Apples on 26" wheels.
    A set of H handlebars (like Vik has on his Big Dummy).

  2. #2
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    I would like the cool color fenders, belt drive, internal hub of the Trek Soho DLX, but the traditional frame and stem, areo position and retro paint of the Raleigh One Way.

    I dont know how I feel about generator lights. Is it enough light I'm use to the high range high power lights. I guess you could double up.



  3. #3
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    My steel Cross Check frame
    Disc brakes with road bb-7 calipers
    Fenders
    Rack + panniers
    Brooks saddle
    Belt drive
    Internal geared hub
    Dinotte 200l front and rear lights
    Combination SPD/Flat pedals

  4. #4
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    24 mile each way commuter bike. Lockers and showers at work. So I don't have to carry work clothes.
    Ti or Steel Road frame with Disc Brakes or rim brakes with ceramic coated 700C rims.
    Semi aero rims
    Carbon Fork with Rack and Fender eyelets. 2 sets of eyelets.
    Up to 28mm tires and easily detachable fenders. Maybe bigger set of fenders for rain season.
    Drop bars and Clip on Aero bars.
    2X9 or 2x10 gearing. Not compact. 52/39 Front and 12-27 Rear.
    Small aero bag for rain gear, wallet and phone.
    Lights battery powered. Frame and seatpost mounted rear lights.
    Under seat bag that holds 2 spare tubes, allen wrenchs, patch kit and tire levers.
    Double sided SPD style mountain bike pedals. Mtb bike shoes with rubber soles and no steel spikes.

    No leather parts to get soaked in rain.

  5. #5
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    If I had a safe place to keep it, probably a bike with the old sport touring geometry, made out of either a decent-quality steel or aluminum, carbon fork, 23mm tires, sidepull brakes, rack and fenders. I'm happy enough to add or subtract my lights depending on whether or not I need them.

    Basically, the sportiest bike I could run fenders on and that would have slightly better manners with a lightly loaded rack. Although belt drive and an internally geared hub does sound pretty sweet.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  6. #6
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    Van Dessel WTF, BB7 brakes, Alfine rear hub, WTB dirt drops, Versa VRS-8 shifters.

  7. #7
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    I got a Giant Seek 3. It is pretty good all around for commuting. It is a MTB geo with700x32 tires. I put a topeak rear rack with the explorer pack (fold down paniers) and a plastic front fender. Shimano M520 with platform insets (good to use spds or chuck taylors). I keep a seatpost bag with 1 tube, tools, patch kit, CO2s. Put a Cateye commuter computer on it (backlit with ETA function) It seems close to just right.... not exactly perfect.
    I like the flat black paint and reflective accents on the forks and rear stays.
    I use a combination of Blackburn lights. 2 Fleas in the front, one in the back, plus battery operated Mars 4.0 and Voyager 3.3.

    things I would change: don't need 3x8... maybe 2x8. Maybe drop bars would be good for longer commutes. added front rack for "gear" so rear bag could be work specific stuff.. I currently keep U lock and cable lock, 1st aid kit and lights with b/u batteries in rear pack, as well as rain cover for the pack. An integrated U-lock carrier would be nice, Topeak makes one.
    Short story, I love my seek3. I have no experience wiht IGH.

    Honestly, I would trade it in exchange for a regular roadie. I don't have a job, so I only "commute" to the grocery, post office, etc. I could do that on my MTB

  8. #8
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    What do you mean it doesn't have mudguards or brakes? Who cares.

  9. #9
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuffink


    What do you mean it doesn't have mudguards or brakes? Who cares.
    That Amaro is cool but I think I'd keep it as a "sunny Sundays" bike

    For my every day commuting, my aluminum frame singlespeed MTB is otherwise good
    but it lacks proper fenders for wet days. Disc brakes and removable lights with rechargeable batteries, please.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  10. #10
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    I don't think a "perfect" commuter exists. Sometimes I want high pressure, low volume 700c slicks and road geometry. Other times I want to explore trails on the way home, so I need to ride a cyclocross bike. And who isn't happy with a fat tired 26" bike? Overlooking the cross bike, the bikes better have fenders, racks and light mounts, and preferably a bell.

  11. #11
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    to me nuffik wins. Who needs lights when everyone car will simply stop and stare at the cool that is pedaling past. Any who needs brakes when... well... everyone is already stopped and gawking.
    and as for fenders, I am sure it is fast enough to outrun the spray.

  12. #12
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    Is there adjustment of the seat hight? If not, I hope the rider likes the seat and petal combo. Sexy though.


  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheoDog
    to me nuffik wins. Who needs lights when everyone car will simply stop and stare at the cool that is pedaling past. Any who needs brakes when... well... everyone is already stopped and gawking.
    and as for fenders, I am sure it is fast enough to outrun the spray.
    Absolutely. Turn up on that thing and the CEO lets you lean it against his Bentley, hands you the keys to the executive bogs, a gram of coke and his secretary.

  14. #14
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    I like this better than the Soho DLX:




    Its also built in Oregon, where I went to school (Go Beavers!). I would put on a flat bar and lower the bar a little.

  15. #15
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    https://www.civiacycles.com/bikes/bryant/

    Alfine dynamo front wheel
    E3 dynamo light.
    Time Allroad combo pedals
    Cane Creek Thudbuster

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryball
    The fenders are not on the bike online. What gives? Not that fenders are hard to put on with good clearance and the right brakes.

  17. #17
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  18. #18
    local trails rider
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    Looks flexy ^^^^

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro
    Racing oriented bike for commute use - no thanks
    Required burning of dead dino juice and release of pollution - no thanks

    Anyway I'm more of a Yamaha fan

  20. #20
    I Have Cookies
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    4130 29'er frame
    RockShox Reba fork
    Chris King HS
    Thompson Cockpit
    Easton Havoc Bar (Full Width)
    Odi Lock Ons
    Full Fenders
    Alfine/Gates Drivetrain
    BB7's 180/160 Rotors
    The Frame would be painted Black

    Scratch all that.......I'll take a 11' Bad Boy Solo Headshock
    Last edited by ae111black; 09-24-2010 at 05:34 PM.
    The most important thing is what God thinks about it. He will have the final say.” – Joshua Stinebrink

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    Kimo

  21. #21
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    Ti frame
    clearance for 28 or 32s w/ fenders
    EBB for ss
    Paul Racer brakes

  22. #22
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    I'm finding more belted commuters now

  23. #23
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    Mine would be similar to what many have described.

    fairly light steel frame, sport touring geometry, carbon fork.
    Light 700c wheels
    Fast 32mm tires, room for 40mm.
    Wide Fenders F/R
    Racks F/R with a bag and panniers to carry shoes, clothes, tools, LOCKS etc.
    Long Reach Sidepulls.
    110 BCD double crankset with 46/36T rings.
    10spd 12-28 cassette.
    Probably Shimano 105 drivetrain
    Would consider internal gearing instead, no experience with it yet though.
    Carbon bars and seatpost
    WTB saddle
    SPD pedals
    Good lights that can easy be removed.

    This bike would probably see much more than commuting, but that's what I would like. Right now I commute on my cross bike. It fits the bill, but it's more of a race bike so it has no eyelets. I find myself missing my Bianchi San Jose almost everyday because it was such a fabulous commuter.

  24. #24
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    They are redoing their web pages, so this its the current link:

    http://www.renovobikes.com/panda-gallery/

    IGH version with 11 speed Alpine Shimano hub (out yet?). Belt drive.

    Hub generator driven lights as base units. Battery helmet and extra lights. (Dark roads, old eyes.) Room for 700 C x 40, if not maybe, 650B-42 (ends up about 20 mm shorter than 700C-32).

    Several other pictured above are tempting. Love steel. Like the concept of Bamboo and this bike complete would cost less than a nice titanium or lugged stainless steel light touring frame. No rust issue. Just habe to ride faster than termites fly!

  25. #25
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    Just bought this for myself. Steel frame is very comfortable, I have racks on mine and waterproof panniers, can mount fenders when I'm ready. DT shifters are super reliable, I prefer gears since my commute is fairly long. I've done a few commutes on this bike already and it's world's nicer to commute on than my carbon road bike, on which I had to carry a backpack.
    :wq

  26. #26
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I'm really glad Specialized decided to release a bike with downtube shifters. I think they're much better than the crappy STI shifters available at that pricepoint. IMHO, the rest of the components are better than what was available thirty years ago, even at the 2300 level. So a really good value.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch
    I'm really glad Specialized decided to release a bike with downtube shifters. I think they're much better than the crappy STI shifters available at that pricepoint. IMHO, the rest of the components are better than what was available thirty years ago, even at the 2300 level. So a really good value.
    Yeah, a real oddity for a large company to produce something "hip" and "retro" and actually succeed in making something that is genuinely cool.

  28. #28
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    Here, a vote for a Retrovelo.

  29. #29
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    Heard of Retrovelo, never looked over their offerings. Very interesting.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch
    I'm really glad Specialized decided to release a bike with downtube shifters. I think they're much better than the crappy STI shifters available at that pricepoint. IMHO, the rest of the components are better than what was available thirty years ago, even at the 2300 level. So a really good value.
    Ultimately I will upgrade that stuff, probably over the next year. Trying to decide exactly how I want to do it - gonna try to cannibalize my carbon bike so it gets nice upgrades too. Ultimately I know I'll end up with Dura-Ace DT shifters and a 10sp drive train. The DA shifters are like $50 on ebay
    :wq

  31. #31
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    You should be fine replacing only the cassette and chain when you go from the current shifters to the 10-speed set. So you can do the rest of the upgrading at your leisure.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  32. #32
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    I designed and built my perfect commuter about a year ago. It's a steel 29er Voodoo Dambala with Rohloff, Schmidt Dynamo, SLX Gear, panniers, fenders and even a handlebar mounted camera bag. If I was to do it again I'd go a belt drive compatible frame.


    Cheers

    HillBilly
    Last edited by HillBillies; 10-01-2010 at 11:38 PM.

  33. #33
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    Uh, oh... I may have a new perfect commuter...



    Folds up in less than 10 seconds so I can park it in the corner of my office.



    Or, if I hit the Lottery, their top of the line, full suspension HP Velotechnik Scorpion FS. This one has a Rohloff, a Schlumpf drive and TWO SON hubs and edeluxe lights.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xrcf...eature=related

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by umarth
    Here, a vote for a Retrovelo.
    I want the RUSSIAN T34

  35. #35
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    I like to have fun in my commute.
    ***

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryball
    Uh, oh... I may have a new perfect commuter...



    Folds up in less than 10 seconds so I can park it in the corner of my office.



    Or, if I hit the Lottery, their top of the line, full suspension HP Velotechnik Scorpion FS. This one has a Rohloff, a Schlumpf drive and TWO SON hubs and edeluxe lights.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xrcf...eature=related
    For long distances a trike would be ideal. Year round, low wind drag, etc. Would be awesome.
    :wq

  37. #37
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    If the commute has no single track or trails, then one of these:



    can be a nice ride.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc
    If the commute has no single track or trails, then one of these:



    can be a nice ride.

    Full on Velomobiles are SO expensive, though.

  39. #39
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryball
    Or, if I hit the Lottery, their top of the line, full suspension HP Velotechnik Scorpion FS. This one has a Rohloff, a Schlumpf drive and TWO SON hubs and edeluxe lights.
    If you hit it big enough, you can quit whatever job you currently have to work at the nearest McDonalds and skip out on that nasty commute of yours on your new 30 inch wide trike. Much less stressfull
    Recalculating....

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    If you hit it big enough, you can quit whatever job you currently have to work at the nearest McDonalds and skip out on that nasty commute of yours on your new 30 inch wide trike. Much less stressfull
    I meant little lottery, not big lottery.

  41. #41
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    Pe2er a member here and on CPF, has reported on improving the lighting of his used Alleweder HPV. He sold it to a guy from Belgium for more than he bought it for when he mentioned he had a Strada on order, actually earning money riding and improving it for 6 months. Anyway he sent this link :

    http://pedalyourselfhealthy.org/

    You can get a kit for less than $3400. Now that's a bit less than $10,000 for a sleek fiberglass one. Another $1000 or so to make it an e-bike, I'd guess but that could wait.

    Don't have to win quite so big.

  42. #42
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    Steel
    Brooks
    Discs
    Marathons
    IGH
    Belt drive
    Marys or other swept bars, higher than saddle
    Racks'n'bags
    Fenders
    Magicshine
    Last edited by Bernard Odum; 10-09-2010 at 06:38 AM.

  43. #43
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    ti
    26/700, room for 35mm cross tire for wintertime.
    discs

    if we're getting picky, greg malms (sp?) 20mm dropouts cause they're frikking sexy.
    120mm disc CK rear hub with custom thru-axle, cause it'd irritate everyone and ck sounds so sexy.
    integrated seatmast so nothing to remove there, brooks ti swallow on the top.
    1 piece integrated stem/bars (had a klein setup like this back in the day, SO slick).

    basically, if you take a good look at your bike and remove every bolt you can think of, make it eternally rust-proof, as quick in the winter as it is in the summer, parts that're so unique that there'd be no reason to steal them since they'd be incompatible with any other bike... that's what I'd like.
    I don't mind locking up my swanky, but I hate returning to a stripped carcass.

    right now I'm on 853 reynolds, 26/700, front disc...
    close enough, hoping winter doesn't freeze my rear wheel up!
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  44. #44
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc
    Pe2er
    You can get a kit for less than $3400. Now that's a bit less than $10,000 for a sleek fiberglass one. Another $1000 or so to make it an e-bike, I'd guess but that could wait.
    Alleweder looks like a great deal if you can actually still get one. I knopw the site is still up, but I`m not quite sure whether you can still order one, at least to North America. It`s a LOT less than the Glyde. There was alos an outfit I was checking out recnetly that offers pretty nice looking shells that you mount to one of a few select tadpole trike models at about $1500 US, not including the trike. That would work out to about the same price as the AW when all was said and done. Might be a winner for Ryball, but I couldn`t fine the website again just now when I went hunting for it.
    Recalculating....

  45. #45
    jrm
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    OMG thats *****en

    Quote Originally Posted by Killroy
    I'm finding more belted commuters now
    probably cant afford it.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by byknuts
    ti
    ...parts that're so unique that there'd be no reason to steal them since they'd be incompatible with any other bike...
    I think you give your average bike thief credit for a lot more fore-thought than they're entitled to.

    "Mmmm look. Shiny. I'll take that."

    I think that's about the extent of the thought process around here.

  47. #47
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    My dream world commuter would probably be a sweet mountain bike that I could ride to work from the trail out my front door. I think my perfect road commuter would still resemble a mountain bike. I like to fool around a bit on the way home. I guess I don't really care much what I ride to work as long as I have a good bike to ride on the trails.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrm
    probably cant afford it.
    I thought it was the perfect commuter until I thought about scratching the paint locking it to a rack. $$$ Maybe unpainted Ti is needed for the perfect commuter?

  49. #49
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    I had the 2009 Trek Soho, but it rattled like crazy, brakes were pretty crappy, and the rear wheel required a screwdriver and crescent wrench to change. Not sure if they've fixed those things in 2010, but I would stay away. I sold the 2009 and bought a proper road bike, which is my commuter now with some clip-on fenders.

    If I were to buy one today, it would be a touring-oriented bike like the Raleigh Sojourn. Steel frame, disc brakes, Bar end Dura-Ace shifters, Brooks saddle, rack and fenders included.


    I also like the Trek Portland, but it has pretty minimal coverage fenders. Still, a great bike and lighter than the Sojourn.


    The Raleigh Clubman is also pretty awesome, but I'd replace the Tiagra shifters with 105/Ultegras:
    "Got everything you need?"

  50. #50
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    I wonder how much the Raleigh Sojourn weights? I have a 2007-2008 One Way and its a tank (but good for commuting) for no racks, no gears, and canti brakes. Its handle bar wall thickness is so thick that it has to have special smaller diameter bar plugs.
    Last edited by Killroy; 10-07-2010 at 01:27 PM.

  51. #51
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    Another Raleigh that caught my interest was the Alley way.



    https://www.raleighusa.com/bikes/hybrid/alley-way-11/

    Steel
    discs
    IGH
    fenders
    belt
    brooks
    one piece integrated stem and bars

    Looks like it has the Alfine dynamo front hub, too, but I don't see a light.
    Last edited by ryball; 10-07-2010 at 01:54 PM.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Killroy
    I wonder how much the Raleigh Sojourn weights? I have a 2007-2008 and its a tank (but good for commuting) for no racks, no gears, and canti brakes. Its handle bar wall thickness is so thick that it has to have special smaller diameter bar plugs.
    So how do you like your sojourn? I'm seriously thinking about buying one, since my current road bike does triple duty as commuter, road rides, and the occasional short tour. I'd like to start doing longer tours this next spring and would like a solid steel frame bike. Any ideas how much your bike/tank weighs?
    "Got everything you need?"

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by ubernerd
    I think you give your average bike thief credit for a lot more fore-thought than they're entitled to.

    "Mmmm look. Shiny. I'll take that."

    I think that's about the extent of the thought process around here.
    ti's not shiny!

    tip of mine, I've posted it before but...
    sand off any logos/markings, remove any stickers.
    even dumb thieves know there's no point in stealing something if they can't re-sell it and noone buys stuff if they can't ID what level part it is.
    (real enthusiasts will recognize a part regardless, but hopefully they're not thieves in the first place)
    doesn't work 100% of the time but it can't hurt!
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  54. #54
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    Whoops, forgot one on my short list: The Kona Sutra. A bit overkill for simply commuting, but I'm also interested in touring so it fits the bill for me. Nice looking bike, but no Brooks saddle .

    "Got everything you need?"

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoHeadsBrewing
    So how do you like your sojourn? I'm seriously thinking about buying one, since my current road bike does triple duty as commuter, road rides, and the occasional short tour. I'd like to start doing longer tours this next spring and would like a solid steel frame bike. Any ideas how much your bike/tank weighs?
    Sorry, omitted that I have a Raleigh One Way. I think the Sojourn is 34 lb based on a Google search. I should weigh my One Way. I bet it is ~25 lb.

  56. #56
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    [QUOTE=TwoHeadsBrewing]Whoops, forgot one on my short list: A bit overkill for simply commuting, but I'm also interested in touring so it fits the bill for me. Nice looking bike, but no Brooks saddle .

    Here the original saddle would do in winter and a Brooks would solve the issue the rest of the year

    Nice bike. I like the Ralieigh Alley-Way, too.

  57. #57
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    I just finished my almost* perfect commuter build.

    Steel frame
    Full coverage fenders
    Room for 37mm tire (and fenders)
    Belt-drive ( homemade conversion )
    IGH
    Hubdynamo & Led lights
    Hydraulic brakes
    Brooks

    * still waiting Alfine 11...


  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by irrah
    I just finished my almost* perfect commuter build.
    Nice.

    What's the..., I guess we'd call it "beltline" with that IGH (Alfine 8?)

    What light are you driving with the hubgen?

  59. #59
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    Another Retrovelo entry. Alas no belt.

    Original.

    Translated.


  60. #60
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    No.

    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro
    Yes.



    If we're talking bicycles...

    ...something steel with fat tires and a nice comfy riding position with a coffee mug mount.

  61. #61
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    Killroy...
    i can't believe this is not your "perfect commuter"

    https://www.nirve.com/mens.asp?cat=cruiser


  62. #62
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    Velomobiles again...

    This one is interresting for two reasons:
    Price- at $3850 complete, it`s the least expensive I`ve come across yet.
    Weather resistance- very well enclosed and with the actual intention being an all weather (English for "allewedder", I believe) commuter and shopper. Based in the PNW, I assume they have rain in mind, too.

    The price includes electric assist, minus battery and charger (figure another $800 or so). Paraphrasing from a BROL poster, the design is from a different angle compared to most other VMs on the current market. The others are made for cyclists and must incorporate more "sporty" feel in order to appeal. The Tripod has greensters or budget minded commuters in mind, so it doesn`t cater much to the sporty side of pedaling life. The result is that it isn`t as light or sleek as a FAW/Mango/Quest and won`t have the high speed handling. But for $3850 and no intercontinental shipping? Hmmm...

    https://columbiacycleworks.com/
    https://www.bentrideronline.com/mess...ghlight=tripod
    Recalculating....

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bernard Odum
    Nice.

    What's the..., I guess we'd call it "beltline" with that IGH (Alfine 8?)

    What light are you driving with the hubgen?
    thanks,

    Beltline
    Front light B&M Cyo, lbs noname rear light.

  64. #64
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    Swobo already designed my perfect commuter. It's called the Folsom. It's cheap, simple, single speed, coaster brake, and light weight. Plus nothing blows off steam better then a 40ft coaster brake skid down a hill after a bad day at work.

    Childish...sure and I wouldn't have it any other way.



  65. #65
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    What's with all the slow bikes for commuters?
    Fat tires, single speeds and Upright positions are just too slow for a fast commute.
    Most of these look like Townies or Bar bikes to me.
    The purpose of a commuter is to get to work and back.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    This one is interresting for two reasons:
    Price- at $3850 complete, it`s the least expensive I`ve come across yet.
    Weather resistance- very well enclosed and with the actual intention being an all weather (English for "allewedder", I believe) commuter and shopper. Based in the PNW, I assume they have rain in mind, too.

    The price includes electric assist, minus battery and charger (figure another $800 or so). Paraphrasing from a BROL poster, the design is from a different angle compared to most other VMs on the current market. The others are made for cyclists and must incorporate more "sporty" feel in order to appeal. The Tripod has greensters or budget minded commuters in mind, so it doesn`t cater much to the sporty side of pedaling life. The result is that it isn`t as light or sleek as a FAW/Mango/Quest and won`t have the high speed handling. But for $3850 and no intercontinental shipping? Hmmm...

    https://columbiacycleworks.com/
    https://www.bentrideronline.com/mess...ghlight=tripod
    oooooooooooooooooooh... *runs off to read the site

  67. #67
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by isahnisahn
    Plus nothing blows off steam better then a 40ft coaster brake skid down a hill after a bad day at work.
    I haven`t single speeded since I got my first 3-speed, and I don`t forsee tasting that particular Kool Aid any time soon, but the prospect of leaving big old snakey skidmarks down the sidewalk is ALMOST enough temptation to push me over the edge
    Recalculating....

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbeer
    What's with all the slow bikes for commuters?
    Fat tires, single speeds and Upright positions are just too slow for a fast commute.
    Most of these look like Townies or Bar bikes to me.
    The purpose of a commuter is to get to work and back.
    I was definitely in your camp when I was under 40 riding less than 5 miles round trip on some very good pavement with almost no grades. Riding with traffic was a healthy high! Perfect SS situation but 12 speeds were just out and the SS craze was in the future. If I could I likely would still.

    I am not criticizing or looking down on your choices. I respectfully ask you for equal treatment of others here.

    I ride more like 25 miles or the errand bike with a large front load. I have learned that you can get some pretty light fat tires (312 g 32 mm, 700C is what I am running on one bike). They are NOT slow. The semi aero Deep Vee rims make up for the extra windage and a bit more over the old classic profile rims. I still have drops, but even though I've lost the 50 pound 'spare tire' I do not enjoy the same low aero position, anymore. My hands go numb even with the fat tires, padded bars, and padded gloves if I go too low. Getting there and back maybe a bit slower and still having a working back and being able to write is a worthy goal. Also a more vertical posture puts more reflective vest area in view. For me the purpose of any riding includes having fun, which means avoiding pain.

    Coaster brake slides...Hmmmm. Bit expensive on the tires I like. Tempting, though.

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    I haven`t single speeded since I got my first 3-speed, and I don`t forsee tasting that particular Kool Aid any time soon, but the prospect of leaving big old snakey skidmarks down the sidewalk is ALMOST enough temptation to push me over the edge

    Oh it's so much fun, it really is.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbeer
    What's with all the slow bikes for commuters?
    Fat tires, single speeds and Upright positions are just too slow for a fast commute.
    Most of these look like Townies or Bar bikes to me.
    The purpose of a commuter is to get to work and back.

    Not everybody's commute is smooth road. I've had several flats on my road bike commuting and it's such a pain in the ass changing a tube at 4:30 am in the dark. I have yet to have a flat on a "fat" tire.

    On my commute, with the short cuts that larger tires afford me, I can save 2 minutes or so each way on my fat tire bike. If I ride the fat tire bike on the same path as my road bike, it takes about 2 minutes longer on average. Not a huge difference for my commute.

  71. #71
    One Colorful Rider
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    For me:
    Summer Bike
    Aluminum frame, CarbonFork
    Specialized Toupe Saddle
    Full fenders (aluminum or heavy plastic).
    Rear rack .
    Fixed Singlespeed
    Caliper Brakes
    Hand-built wheels
    Shimano clipless.
    Anything but black paint.
    Specialied All Condition Tires
    All Silver Rims, H-Bars, Seatpost Stem so if a headlight hits it Reflect the light
    Kind a like this
    <a href="https://s498.photobucket.com/albums/rr349/Normbilt/?action=view&current=Backyard018.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="https://i498.photobucket.com/albums/rr349/Normbilt/Backyard018.jpg" border="0" alt="Summer Bike"></a>


    For My Winter Bike
    Steel frame and fork.
    Specialized Avatar saddle.
    SKS Full fenders
    .Fixed Singlespeed
    V-brakes
    Hand-built wheelsets
    Shimano clipless.
    Anything but black paint.
    700 X 32 tires with reflective Sidewalls
    spare set of wheels with Kenda Klondike Studded tire on them
    kind of like this
    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/4255882430/" title="Going to Work 1/7/10 by normbilt, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm5.static.flickr.com/4059/4255882430_d92af48b68_b.jpg" width="1024" height="768" alt="Going to Work 1/7/10" /></a>

  72. #72
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    You don't have a problem with snow packing the fenders? I noticed a lot of if built up on my MTB when I rode it in the snow a couple winters ago.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch
    You don't have a problem with snow packing the fenders? I noticed a lot of if built up on my MTB when I rode it in the snow a couple winters ago.
    Most of the time it's been well below freezing and the snow is dry and fluffy
    if warm enough snow melts on street and studded tires not needed

  74. #74
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    My 11 mile commute is 95% bike paths. It's not the most direct route, but if I'm riding fast enough (at 6am) it feels like a roller coster with the smooth hills and tight turns. For this reason I wanted a quick handling bike with an upright position and fat tires. Also durable because of my 240 lbs.

    I was lucky enough to build my dream bike last year for this type of riding. I owe the success of this build to the people on this form. I lurked for about a year. Lots of great ideas here.

    Surly Karate Monkey
    Dyad rims / Alfine hub / 40x700 Maxxis Overdrive Tires
    Carbon riser handlebar
    WTB Rocket V saddle with Ti rails
    OMM rack

    When I ride this bike I feel pretty damn lucky!

  75. #75
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    Here's mine...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Design your Perfect Commuter-fender-strong.jpg  


  76. #76
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    That's a really attractive bike. I'm envious.

    What kind of a crank is that?

    Could you put a rack on it?
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by singlecross
    Here's mine...
    650B -38mm ?

    12-36 cassette?

    50-34 chainwheels?

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by markaitch
    Killroy...
    i can't believe this is not your "perfect commuter"

    https://www.nirve.com/mens.asp?cat=cruiser

    'Cool

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch
    That's a really attractive bike. I'm envious.

    What kind of a crank is that?

    Could you put a rack on it?
    The crank is a Suntour XC pro.

    Yes there is a colormatched rear rack when I need it. This winter I'm having a custom front rack and light bar made for a handlebar bag and dynamo lighting system.

    Thanks...

    singlecross

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMc
    650B -38mm ?

    12-36 cassette?

    50-34 chainwheels?
    26" x 1.25 currently, but the bike will take 26"x2.1/ 650B x 42/ 700c x 25 as the upper limit. The best part of the disc brakes are these wheel size swaps are a flip of the quick releases away.

    11-32 cassette.

    26-36-46 Suntour XC Pro cranks.

  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by singlecross
    26" x 1.25 currently, but the bike will take 26"x2.1/ 650B x 42/ 700c x 25 as the upper limit. The best part of the disc brakes are these wheel size swaps are a flip of the quick releases away.
    Now THAT`s versatility! And to top it off, friction mode on the shifters, I assume
    Recalculating....

  82. #82
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    Around here the perfect commuter needs to look super ugly(thief-ville), but function mechanically perfect, and be at least semi-efficient. Cue 1986 mint green and pink stumpjumper with slick tires and fenders. Most of the bikes I've seen in this thread are too nice to leave locked outside for eight hours a day IMO.

  83. #83
    Still want a fat bike....
    Reputation: Dalton's Avatar
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    Mine would probably just be a 1x8 or 9 or 11 with a belt drive due to the possibility of snow riding. Needs fenders for snow and rain. Probably a steelie because it absorbs some of the shock of the horrible MI roads. I'm thinking a midge or moustache bar. Not sure what else I would want on there.....

  84. #84
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    I like the sound of that Swobo Falsom a number of posts back, bone simple, "Please dont steal me, steal the other guys" bike color (for those that have to lock up out of sight).

    I've recently been peepin a pair of Torker commuters..(even tho I dont commute), they just seem like great simple, cheap, urban-living bikes (even tho I dont live in the city).. cant explain why I want one tho...dont really need either.

    The KB2 I really like..2-speed IGH (single-speed with 'hill climb' option..lol and coaster brake). ($400 MSRP)



    and the Graduate that might be more year round friendly and just more "sensible and practical". 5-speed IGH, f/r drum brakes, full fenders. ($500 MSRP)


  85. #85
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    My Jamis Aurora is the first daily commuter and touring bike that I've kept in a single configuration for more than 6 months without wanting to change or replace it. Here's the current configuration:

    -Stock chromoly frame set and Alex rims AIC-19 wheel set
    -Vittoria Randonneur 32c tires
    -Brooks Team Professional saddle
    -Easton EA70 alloy seat post
    -Salsa alloy stem and bars
    -Dura-Ace bar-end shifters (all friction, all the time)
    -Stock FSA/Tiagra 9-speed drive train
    -Voyager alloy rear rack
    -Ortlieb Backroller Classic panniers (I usually run one for commuting)

  86. #86
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    Normbilt - why alu in the summer but steel in the winter?

  87. #87
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    Hi All - why brooks saddles? wont leather suffer in the winter?

  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimK2010
    Hi All - why brooks saddles? wont leather suffer in the winter?
    What would be the issue? The cold doesn't seem to affect the leather (it might if I stored my bike outside, but I don't). If it is snowing or raining, I cover the saddle with a plastic bag. You can also buy elasticized waterproof covers that stow neatly under the saddle, but I've been using the same thick plastic bag for 6 months with no issues.

  89. #89
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    Hi datalore - ive never ridden Brooks so sorry for my nievety. Are they that superior to more conventional saddles?

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimK2010
    Hi datalore - ive never ridden Brooks so sorry for my nievety. Are they that superior to more conventional saddles?
    As with so many things, in cycling there is no "superior". There is only what works better for you and your goals. For certain applications, Brooks saddles tend to possess certain advantages for some people. If you race and/or want to ride as light a bike as possible, a Brooks saddle is probably too heavy to meet your needs. If, however, you value comfort and durability over weight (as many commuters do), a Brooks saddle may offer some advantages. First, a good leather saddle conforms to the shape of your body over time, like an old pair of leather shoes. As with leather shoes, there can be some discomfort during the initial break-in period, but after a while, you'll notice that nothing else feels as good. Second, good leather saddles tend to last longer and treat the skin better than synthetic materials. It is worth noting that Brooks produces a variety of different saddle shapes designed for different body types and different applications. You may need to try a few to know what best suits your riding position and physical characteristics. In my case, the Team Professional is wide enough to support my sit bones (mine are widely spaced for my size) but has a small enough profile to accommodate a reasonably vigorous riding position.
    Last edited by datalore; 10-29-2010 at 03:29 PM.

  91. #91
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    Something sexy like this:
    Quote Originally Posted by anthonys
    Its still just the push of a button away...
    I am no longer a hardtailkid. 2012 Trek Remedy 9!

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by Killroy
    Is there adjustment of the seat hight? If not, I hope the rider likes the seat and petal combo. Sexy though.
    why else do you think they sell cranks in 2.5mm increments.
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by frankenmike
    Around here the perfect commuter needs to look super ugly ... function mechanically perfect, and be at least semi-efficient. .... Most of the bikes I've seen in this thread are too nice to leave locked outside for eight hours a day IMO.
    This got me thinking about 'dressing down' the bike. I have the advantage that they don't know when I will be where or for how long, but I hope that will change. Oh, and it is already an old classic era frame, good, but not collectable.

    So I have been thinking about building on this. There is an adage that all bikes including their locks weigh 50 pounds. So a 17 pound bike needs a 33 pound lock, a 25 pound bike a 25 pound lock, and a 50 pound or more bike needs no locks. Not quite true, but more than a grain of truth in there. Long Johns and Surly Dummies are not high on thieves lists.

    If I could guarantee the same rack so I could leave a big ol' motorcycle lock, that would be a big step to the 'too heavy to bother stealing bike'. Maybe sabotage the weight more. The soon to be retired Brooks saddle (38 years) could be loosened so it's sway backed, mounted on a long solid steel bar (rusty, of course), and swap it for the good saddle at work with a QR seat post clamp. If I can bring the front wheel into my office/cube, I could leave it front wheelless, or sub one with bent rim, broken spokes, and flat tire mostly filled with an antifreeze solution to add that certain. "je ne sai quoi" (Potential thief, if they STILL try for the POS: "This thing's a TANK! Howzanywun ride the dang thang?" Can you spell hernia? )

    It needs a good protective paint job. No one said it had to look like one!. I thought maybe a simulated blistered, faded and corroded look, complete with cracks and rust-throughs at the BB Shell. All stainless and alloy rims bits painted to look like peeling and pock marked chrome and rusting painted steel mismatched to the frame color. Clever treatment of the bar tape to make it look decrepit. Paint the cluster rust, and don't clean it over thoroughly. I wonder if KMC includes 'rust' in their painted chain? Original logos replaced with faded scratched and partly flaked off "Huffy" logos. Talk about 'murdered out'.

    Of course, making the bike that repulsive to thieves may take a bit of pride out of ownership. It may even make it hard to keep breakfast down. But can you imagine passing or just keeping up with someone riding a new 17 pound carbon bike?!

    Priceless!

  94. #94
    weirdo
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    I don`t have to camoflage quality for anywhere that I ride/park my bike, but I`ve gotten to like the idea of a Barney or Dora paint job. Maybe I`ll do it anyway.
    Recalculating....

  95. #95
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    Yes, Barney or Dora is a must-do! I always thought the black tape over the decals method screamed "look I'm expensive, they had to cover up the make and model".

  96. #96
    a lazy pedaler
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    RUST!

    not KMC...powder from powderbuythepound

  97. #97
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    Idea for Scotch Reflective tape Bike Div.: a clear at the edges (so it blends with frame), rust/chipped to steel paint look with a letter kit to apply your own 'psuedo' brand and model names in optional fonts. That way, everyone's fake is different and 'Hufy' with one 'f' is not a give away to the product. Have it shine as reflective tape at night: Presto: anti-theft and safety product in one!.

    Another version: the really bad rattle-can three-fade covering logos, with glitter of course. Or Barney and Dora versions. Saw one bike with a fabric applique. It went to PLAID! (Sorry, check out Space Balls, if you did not get that.) Imagine different conflicting fabrics as tape for each blade, tube, and stay. Maybe a Police Bike treatment with a small disclaimer in the bottom of the down tube to keep it legal: "This is NOT and unmarked Police Bike!" Mess with their brains (what little they haven't fried, anyway.) Oh, and how about tape that simulates brushed on semi gloss latex including show through and stains on the paint? Nothing says this bike is pure crap like a nice flat white paint job with greasy hand prints and coffee stains (at least I HOPE that's coffee before elimination).

    The rust coating won't have to be perfect on the chain, so can you just degrease the sides of the chain and bake the powdercoat on without ruining the grease in the links? Shame to lose the best lube a chain ever has.

  98. #98
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    The Raleigh Soujurn is what my ideal commuter would look like but with a IGH. I have ridden the bike before around my LBS, it is a heavy pig but I don't see it flexing under load.

    I am currently building up a Fisticuff and hoping this becomes my dream commuter with 38c 1x8/9.
    Mr. Krabs: Is it true, Squidward? Is it hilarious?

  99. #99
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pink57
    The Raleigh Soujurn is what my ideal commuter would look like but with a IGH. I have ridden the bike before around my LBS, it is a heavy pig but I don't see it flexing under load.

    I am currently building up a Fisticuff and hoping this becomes my dream commuter with 38c 1x8/9.
    Since I like offering up dumb advice, have you thought of running a 2x5? You could set the bike up for a wider range of gears, have less chain drag (which is fairly minimal in any case) at the low cost of having to set up a front derailer....

  100. #100
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    I would but I am also planning on this bike doing trail use so I would appreciate the extra gears, I do ride SS most of the year minus winter though.

    But it is not a terrible idea and am curious about a cheap shifter for the rear. I already have a shimano (Nashbar brand) rear der for this setup.
    Mr. Krabs: Is it true, Squidward? Is it hilarious?

  101. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by hardtailkid
    Something sexy like this:


    There's an exact same frameset of one of those Dogma on Realcyclist for a mere $5800 .


    I want to build this frameset and it's only going for a measly $5500.


  102. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by cda 455


    There's an exact same frameset of one of those Dogma on Realcyclist for a mere $5800 .


    I want to build this frameset and it's only going for a measly $5500.

    *snip*
    Pinarello offers the best looking road bikes, in my hardly-humble opinion. If only I had the money. Haha
    Quote Originally Posted by anthonys
    Its still just the push of a button away...
    I am no longer a hardtailkid. 2012 Trek Remedy 9!

  103. #103
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    I went with a Dew Drop that was dolled up with full fenders and lights. Aluminum frame, steel fork, 8 speed mountain drivetrain, BB7 road brakes. I hate the Sora levers. I hated the tires until I put something better on.

    Since a lot of commuting is a compromise I'm pretty happy where I ended up.

  104. #104
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    perfect

    2009 GF cobia
    schwalbe 700x38c marathon plus
    m540 pedals
    topeak tourist dx rack
    torunk mxp or something bag
    upside down stem
    water bottle mp3
    xt rear gears

    want list:
    commuter cat eye cpu
    more time to ride
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Design your Perfect Commuter-imgp0474.jpg  

    Last edited by AntiNSA; 12-04-2010 at 08:52 PM. Reason: fixed imgs

  105. #105
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    The rope around your seatpost is to tie up your escort should you have to run into the bar for a quick one?

    Recalculating....

  106. #106
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    Yes, In china it is good to tie everything to your bike. I never know what I need to tie up next. Besides, bunjie chords are cool. They should belong to every bike. Like duck tape. Electrical tape. Seems like they need to go with you everywhere.

  107. #107
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    I´m thinking in a new project of a conmuter and waht I have in mind is next:

    - Titanium CX frame with a bit of sloping.
    - Avid BB7 Road brakes (140 mm rotors).
    - Road handlebar (maybe carbon).
    - Shimano Alfine 11 (I have no money for a Rohloff).
    - Carbon fork with disc brakes and fender mounts.
    - Brooks saddle and bar tape in honey colour.
    - Clearance in frame and fork for 700 x 44 tires.

  108. #108
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    Moots Psychlo-X YBB frame, standard geometry, but with bent top tube.. Disc brake tabs only. Hooded slider dropouts. Upper & lower fender eyelets. Eyelets for rear rack (Tubus). All Moots decals except downtube in envelopè!!!

    Brakes: Magura Marta SL, 180 mm./160 mm. Upgrade to titanium bolts.
    Headset: Chris King Ti No Thread Set, 1 1/8”.
    Hub set: Chris King 32h Single Speed Disc Hub Set, front and rear in mango.
    Freewheel: White Industries Eno DOS freewheel.
    Seatpost: Moots 27.2 mm. X 340 mm straight Ti Cinch post, Silver faceplate.
    Handlebars: Used Moots Ti Riser Bar,if it can be found refinished by Moots
    Stem: Moots Open Trail 31.8 mm stem silver faceplate.
    Saddle: Brooks Green B17 with titanium rails.
    Bar Grips: ESI Racer’s Edge in Black.
    Handlebar Caps: Zipp Carbon Fiber caps.
    Bottom Bracket: Phil Wood Titanium Spindle Square Taper BB and cups
    Crankset: Middleburn square taper RS8 silver crank arms.
    Chainring: Homebrewed Components 32T, 3/32” Middleburn compatible in titanum.
    Chain: Connex Wippermann 9s1, 100% stainless steel hollow pin.
    Fork: Black Sheep Unicrown Ti Fork. Disc brake tabs and fender eyelets.
    Rims: Mavic TN 719 32h 29er Disc.
    Tires: Marathon Extreme HS 402 folding bead 700 X 35 mm.
    Spokes: DT Swiss double butted stainless steel spokes.
    Nipples: Titan Wheel Technologies Titanium nipples --.anodize green
    Fenders: Planet Bike Cascadia 29er. Remove logo from mudflaps.
    Rear Rack: Titanium Tubus Airy
    Skewers: None -- Chris King FunBolts front and rear.
    Water Bottle Cages: King in titanum
    Bell: Titanium MKS bell.
    Front Light: Black Serfas TSL-250 rechargeable TRUE LIGHT.
    Rear Light: Hella RL ONE battery powered seatpost mounted rear light.
    Pedals: Twenty6 Prerunner, black color, titanium spindle.

    It would look nice to be sure...

  109. #109
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    to much detail?

  110. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntiNSA
    to much detail?
    Au contraire! The more details attributed to the objects of your desire, the more the likelihood that the object in question will manifest.

  111. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drdan
    Au contraire! The more details attributed to the objects of your desire, the more the likelihood that the object in question will manifest.
    Amen

  112. #112
    I'm SUCH a square....
    Reputation: bigpedaler's Avatar
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    I ride one bike for everything, and the one I have ('05 Dakar XLT 1.0) rocks!

    But I will presuppose that I can own and use different bikes for special purposes.

    - Ibis Silk Ti
    - Manitou 120mm fork
    - SRAM XX group
    - Maxxis 310 tires on Mavic 819 rims (tubeless) and King hubs.
    - Selle SMP TRK saddle
    - Truvativ Race carbon bar, Tektro carbon levers mated to 185 BB7's, and white carbon bar ends.

    Ride that to work, and play on a SC Nomad with X.0 and RaceFace.

  113. #113
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    It would be nice if you gys could post pics of your dream frames at least

  114. #114
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    He's mine...

  115. #115
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    26" wheeled mtn bike frame. Steeper head tube geometry, 71-72, don't know if I would notice this or not. Single speed. 1.5 - 2.0 wide tires. Rack and fender mounts. Was bidding on a Jamis frame that would build into what I want, didn't bid high enough.
    My favorite bike for commuting is the Eighth" Scrambler. Have 700-35's with fenders and a rack. Simple and fun. Not exactly hi-perf though.

  116. #116
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    How about something with natural assist:


  117. #117
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    A commuter using the Whike in the Netherlands:

    http://translate.google.nl/translate...erkWhiken.html

    As I read it, those are km/h. I rarely get to ride with winds below 16 kph, gusting to 20. So half the 'canvas', maybe 2/3 could be furled most of the time. Can't imagine keeping it on a safe and steady course as you catch the wind coming out from behind a stand of wind-breaking trees or when passed by a semi.

  118. #118
    weirdo
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    I don`t think the author worries much about being passed by that semi while riding the dike. Must be a lot of fun in a large empty parking lot, but I`m with you- I won`t be riding it on the shoulder of any major road.

  119. #119
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    My perfect commuter currently is a 1989 Schwinn Prelude! Brooks saddle and cloth bar tape, only way to go! OR my Raleigh XXIX...even more fun when the wind is with you...

  120. #120
    weirdo
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    BassBiker, do you have a Prelude, or that`s just what you wish for? We need pics if you`ve got one! My daily driver is a Japanese Schwinn, but mtb frame.

  121. #121
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    I have one! And what a sweet ride it is! It's currently setup as a 1x9...so much fun!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Design your Perfect Commuter-img_0101.jpg  


  122. #122
    M8 M12 M15 deez nuts
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    Must have features:
    • Gates belt-drive
    • Shimano Alfine (or Rohloff)
    • Disc brakes (Avid BB7s are JUST FINE, don’t need any fancy pants hydraulics just for a commuter bike)
    • 26" x 2.5" Maxxis Hookworm tires
    Don’t frail and blow if you’re going to Braille and Flow.

  123. #123
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    My "Perfect Commuter" is in the works. However, I rarely get to commute to work as I have to be in a vehicle most of the time. I ride our local greenways very often and take off-trail excursions from the greenway on a regular basis. What has worked the best for me is a 29'er mountain bike frame with skinny tires. A group of area folks meet up most Wednesday evenings in the winter and we do a Pub sprint at a typically spirited pace. People show-up with all kinds of bikes from full carbon road racers to 26" wheeled beaters. I have tried road bikes and CX bikes but a mountain bike suits me best. My new project is a Lynskey Ridgeline with rack and fender mounts. Gonna be a while before I get it together. Still need a fork and head set and the items I'm looking at are very pricey.


  124. #124
    weirdo
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    Tasty, Bassbike!
    Are those aero routed brakes? It looks like you somehow "aero-ized" non aero levers. Suntour Cyclone for the remaining drivetrain?

  125. #125
    Bedwards Of The West
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    Aluminum frame/steel fork drop bar rigid 29er, Schwalbe Big Apple 2.35's, full fenders, bar end shifters. no front derailleur at the moment (compact road double front crankset that I shift with my toe), BB7's. The shifters are selectable 8 speed/friction, so I can throw the 9 speed mountain bike (also 29er) wheelset on there (same size brake rotors), and the friction shifters handle the 9 speed nicely, even with the 8 speed chain. For my dirt/pavement/trail option commute, it was the best I could come up with. No complaints.

    Here it is in road mode:



    and with the mtn wheels:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Design your Perfect Commuter-picture2.jpg  

    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  126. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasevr4
    Van Dessel WTF, BB7 brakes, Alfine rear hub, WTB dirt drops, Versa VRS-8 shifters.
    Are you my long lost twin? I'm building this exact bike up at the moment, except with Salsa woodchippers. This will be my first IGH foray.

  127. #127
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    AMEX gift card = changes coming.

  128. #128
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    Which bars are those

    Quote Originally Posted by irrah
    I just finished my almost* perfect commuter build.

    Steel frame
    Full coverage fenders
    Room for 37mm tire (and fenders)
    Belt-drive ( homemade conversion )
    IGH
    Hubdynamo & Led lights
    Hydraulic brakes
    Brooks

    * still waiting Alfine 11...

    Very nice irrah, what bars are those?

  129. #129
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    I'll second that, Jamis Aurora

    Quote Originally Posted by datalore
    My Jamis Aurora is the first daily commuter and touring bike that I've kept in a single configuration for more than 6 months without wanting to change or replace it. Here's the current configuration:

    -Stock chromoly frame set and Alex rims AIC-19 wheel set
    -Vittoria Randonneur 32c tires
    -Brooks Team Professional saddle
    -Easton EA70 alloy seat post
    -Salsa alloy stem and bars
    -Dura-Ace bar-end shifters (all friction, all the time)
    -Stock FSA/Tiagra 9-speed drive train
    -Voyager alloy rear rack
    -Ortlieb Backroller Classic panniers (I usually run one for commuting)
    Picked mine up new off of ebay, frame, fork and headset for a $100. What a great versatile 520 cromo frame. Braze-ons galore, plenty of tire clearance. I originally had it set up with flat MTB bars, but the Soma Sparrows with ergons are absolutely dreamy. I just don't want to get off and frequently my 20 minute mostly downhill commute home turns into an hour or more. It is set up with a 50-34 compact crank and 11-32 cassette on the back for wide gearing and loaded up hill slogs. The Nashbar Euro panniers are also a great deal for $40 and perfect commute size. The only weak link are the caliper only breaks, which would probably be a bit sketchy on a fully loaded tour.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Design your Perfect Commuter-jamis-commuter-small.jpg  


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