Companies getting on board with bikecommuting- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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  2. #2
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    Excellent and encouraging news. I would love to see more of the folks who hold the levers of power cycling into work.

  3. #3
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    They probably understand the costs of fat, sedentary employees and the cost of providing a spot for that employee to store their vehicle during work hours.

    I like it because as a "regular" person who bike commutes, the constant focus on the hipster barista or bike shop owner as a bike commuter makes us look like a fringe group. Its nice to see more "mainstream" people coming on board.

  4. #4
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    Its a good thing to encourage. The added fitness is great for company productivity, not to mention the other benefits. However its not an option for all due to distance or coming to work all sweaty without shower facilities, and unsecured places to lock up your ride.

    It would be nice if companies gave X $$$ for each day commuted at the end of the year. Or I myself would be even happier with X $$$ for each day I commuted to work to a charity, this way I would know each pedal stroke might help cure a disease or help a cause.

  5. #5
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    My company has offered bikes for commuting for a few years. I believe some are E-bikes as well as regular cruisers. They also offer several secure areas to lock the bikes up as well as normal outdoor racks.

    When I decided to commute once in a while on my Trance I had to get additional badge in rights to get access into the secure bike area. So to get in you have to badge in which obviously identifies who goes in and out along with cameras and guards. Still, I was asking the guard why they don't have a way to lock the bikes. She was like, some people leave their $2,000 bikes in here so you shouldn't have a problem. I didn't even bother to argue that wonderful logic nor let her know my bike cost 3x more than that.

    But it's nice and they have small monetary rewards for biking to work and the amount goes up the more you bike. I figured out that if you bike every day you can get up to $200 a month. That's not a bad deal when the bikes are supplied for you so there's no wear a a tear on your bike and it's truly free to bike to work.
    '08 Hardrock HRXC
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    ^^Wow, that's pretty cool, BuickGN.

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    That is amazing, by 2025 they call for a 10% cycling modal share in London. So by the time London has a Mediterranean climate and large parts of it become the river Thames, the Atlantic Ocean, plus new swamp land, maybe they can set the high target of a 15-20% modal share!

    I am so chuffed that finally some corporations have such unambitious environmental concerns and make such tepid goals...

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by BuickGN View Post
    My company has offered bikes for commuting for a few years. I believe some are E-bikes as well as regular cruisers. They also offer several secure areas to lock the bikes up as well as normal outdoor racks.

    When I decided to commute once in a while on my Trance I had to get additional badge in rights to get access into the secure bike area. So to get in you have to badge in which obviously identifies who goes in and out along with cameras and guards. Still, I was asking the guard why they don't have a way to lock the bikes. She was like, some people leave their $2,000 bikes in here so you shouldn't have a problem. I didn't even bother to argue that wonderful logic nor let her know my bike cost 3x more than that.

    But it's nice and they have small monetary rewards for biking to work and the amount goes up the more you bike. I figured out that if you bike every day you can get up to $200 a month. That's not a bad deal when the bikes are supplied for you so there's no wear a a tear on your bike and it's truly free to bike to work.
    I already commute to work on my own bike on most days, for free. If they paid me up to $200 a month for that, I would do it exclusively.
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

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