The Comoutant is up and running...- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    132

    The Comoutant is up and running...

    After many many hours of trade-off's and tinkering, choices, waiting for parts, assembling, and waiting for parts even longer. And of course the mandatory internet reading, a great part of it on mtbr (thanks for the wealth of information!).
    Followed by the first 500 kilometres and the inevitable adjustments...

    I finally declare my newly built commuter fully operational.

    As the topic title implies, 'Comoutant', this bike is based on the Moots Comooter. Which represented my absolute dreambike for my daily ride to and from crèche (for my son), school (for my daughter) and work. With the main part, up to school, trailing a rear carrier for the kids.
    But financially, the original version was out of reach for me. And I was of the opinion that, for my needs, the build could be even further refined.

    My first goal with this bike was to build an absolutely trouble free, maintenance free and comfortable bike. Not to mention fun.

    Riding my bike every day and having kids means I do not have the time to perform a lot of maintenance on my daily bike. Add to that the tons and tons of salt that are sprayed on the roads here in Brussels, Belgium, every winter and you have the ideal recipe for drivetrain failure. And indeed, my previous bike needed a new drivetrain after every winter due to this combination. Hence the exchange of the chain and dérailleur for a belt and internal gear hub.
    Because of the need for absolute corrosion proofness, as well as because this bike is after all based on the Moots, as much parts as possible had to be in Titanium of course .

    The no maintenance requirement also ment no suspension fork.

    And the comfort is being taken care of by the well known Scwalbe Big Apple tires. As well as by the rack and panniers. Which mean I can finally stop hauling all needed stuff (locks, food, working cloths, rain cloths, tools,...) around on my back.

    After these first 500 kilometres I must say I am extremely happy with this bike. Which has surpassed my expectations. To be honest, I consider it better than the Comooter, for my needs of course. But I am sure many of that is due also to the personal satisfaction of having puzzled this bike together from scratch.

    Long live bike commuting!!

    the resulting puzzle..


    a close-up and even more puzzling..


    all packed up and ready to (rock and) roll
    Last edited by SurfHenk; 09-20-2009 at 12:29 PM.

  2. #2
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    6,223
    Oooh- Edelux and Seculite! And I assume that`s a Schmidt hub in front? How about the rear hub- must be Rohlhoff, but I didn`t know they could be belt driven. Wee need more pictures of that bike! And a few pictures of your commute would be nice, too.

  3. #3
    Ovaries on the Outside
    Reputation: umarth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,419
    That dropout is such a cluster fuk. But the bike looks absolutely fantastic and I would say that the bike is better than the Moots. It looks really sharp.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    132
    Thank you both for the kind comments.

    I think clicking on the pictures should bring you to Picasa and therefore to the coresponding album.

    But if not, here is the link to the album directly

    While the cost of the "real" Comooter was way above my charts, the bike indeed has been built up with what I consider are some of the finest components for it's particular application.
    And so yes, an Edelux and Seculite it are.
    And a Schmidt front hub.
    A Rohlof as well
    ...
    ...


    I will certainly admit the rear dropout area being a huge cluster of nuts, bolts and whatever else. It was the price and complexity to pay for the combination of sliding dropouts, a rear rack, fenders, a mount for the children's carrier,...
    Making sure all of this would fit by judging the 2D drawings of the frame and fork was probably the hardest, as well as riskiest, part of the project. I sure am glad everything fits together exactly as intended, often with little to no clearance. Or even some occasional filing here and there.
    All of these bolts being steel still shows some sanity of mind though (I at least like to believe so), since I am very proud having resisted the "need" to replace these by their Titanium counter parts. At least for now. And Tomorrow. Maybe aftertomorrow... must resist....
    The goal after all was not to build the lightest bike in the world. All commuting accessories indeed come at a rather heavy weight penalty. But when towing my two kids and their strawler, I do not think Titanium bolts would feel that much lighter
    Last edited by SurfHenk; 09-20-2009 at 01:51 PM.

  5. #5
    No-Brakes Cougar
    Reputation: Gary the No-Trash Cougar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,143
    NICE! That's beautiful man. I love the camel back frame and wide fenders, it's like a cruiser that's 100% functional and versatile as a commuter, utility bike, etc... I'd say you did far better than the Comooter with this one.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 – May 16, 2010

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    132
    Quote Originally Posted by Gary the No-Trash Cougar
    NICE! That's beautiful man. I love the camel back frame and wide fenders, it's like a cruiser that's 100% functional and versatile as a commuter, utility bike, etc... I'd say you did far better than the Comooter with this one.
    Thank you Gary for this very nice comment!

    I also really like the curved top tube, which is a purely esthetic choice, but some people are against this because of the greater stand-over height. It has not bothered me one bit to be honest.
    And yes, the goal was to have a fully functional and relatively quick bike while still having some cruiser style.

  7. #7
    Bedwards Of The West
    Reputation: CommuterBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    5,451
    I love it! That really is sharp.
    Nice work. I was already itching to start building another bike, and now I'm totally screwed. I need to find something to sell...
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    33
    Super nice bike!

  9. #9
    No-Brakes Cougar
    Reputation: Gary the No-Trash Cougar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,143
    Quote Originally Posted by SurfHenk
    Thank you Gary for this very nice comment!

    I also really like the curved top tube, which is a purely esthetic choice, but some people are against this because of the greater stand-over height. It has not bothered me one bit to be honest.
    And yes, the goal was to have a fully functional and relatively quick bike while still having some cruiser style.
    Stand-over height is only really a major concern if you are mountain biking with it. Otherwise, if you can touch the ground at a stop it should be fine. Again, totally awesome!
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 – May 16, 2010

  10. #10

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    22
    Love it - love the color and the seatpost angle blends in well with the curves of the frame

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    632
    That is a beautiful commuter.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    49
    WOAH!!! im floored!! that is BADDASS!!

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.