Commuting via mountain bike- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Commuting via mountain bike

    I am going to be commuting to work by use of my fs trail bike and I was wondering how many other people do this. I have gotten to the point where spending 3.25 / gallon of gas is getting to be a bit much. I dont have the budget right now for a commuting specific bike. My ride is only going to be about 5 miles mostly main roads.
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  2. #2
    veldrijder
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    You've been spending gas money up to this point - financing a cheap commute friendly bike at that rate should take no time at all (i.e. a month or two of gas money, maybe). I'd hate to commute with any sort of suspension or knobby tires.

  3. #3
    All That is Man
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    Goo! I wouldn't enjoy that much, but I have been riding on a rigid Trek mtn bike with road tires and it's tolerable for my hour commute. How long is your ride? At least throw some road tires on there. Right now I'm looking at buying a single speed road/track bike for about $700 which will pay for itself in about 4 months at the current gas prices.
    John

  4. #4

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    I would think about changing the tires. Congrats on making the switch!

  5. #5
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    I just installed some road type tires on my full ridgig MTB. I got them for $9 ea at performance bike and there kevlar lined, works for getting into it and I didnt have to change tubes (there a 1.75 width). Im gettin ready to bust the commute to work on my MTB too, hope it goes well. Keep your eye on Craigslist and you could snap you up a good bike that noone is using!

  6. #6
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    For a 5 mile ride MTB tires do not bother me, it would bug me more switching them back when I wanted to go play in the dirt.

    My worry would be commuting on an expensive FS bike and where I would have to lock it up, for me I would rather ride a real cheap used bike for commuting if I had to have it locked up outside at work.

    Ray


    Quote Originally Posted by Idriver
    I am going to be commuting to work by use of my fs trail bike and I was wondering how many other people do this. I have gotten to the point where spending 3.25 / gallon of gas is getting to be a bit much. I dont have the budget right now for a commuting specific bike. My ride is only going to be about 5 miles mostly main roads.

  7. #7
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    Just ride, knobbies whatever... I ride my FS MTB with knobbies about 20 mins in and 45 minutes back...

    It is all just training weight for the trails anyway.

    Great fun passing a roadie on an MTB.

  8. #8
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    Ive been looking around and came across an older Gary Fisher hardtail with road tires on it for real cheap. Im going to look at it tonight to see if it will serve the purpose. My total commute time is going to be probably about half an hour +/- .
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  9. #9
    is buachail foighneach me
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    for 5 miles, knobbies wont be a problem. i usually prefer to commute with knobby tires anyway, so that i have the option of hitting up trails on the way home.

  10. #10
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    I love commuting on my SS rigid MTB! I think it is one of the better tools for the job. Didn't even have to go with slicks; the Specialized Armadillo Crossroad tires are great all arounders, as they're slick on the pavement part, but knobby on the sides, for dirt. Think it'd kinda suck with a FS and full knobbies, but with this configuration I'm ready for whatever comes.

  11. #11
    I'm SUCH a square....
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    i've been a MTB commuter for nearly 8 yrs., for a couple reasons -- can only afford 1 bike, and roads around here can be a gnarly as a trail! the commute now is only a couple miles, basically just a warmup, but it used to be (1st 6 yrs) 9 miles one way. got it down to 33 min. on knobbies (and some people say pushing 50 is exercise enough -- HAH!) i don't think much about making the commute easier w/ slicks or anything like that -- keeping the HR up is what you need to grow old w/ vigor!
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  12. #12

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    Slicks are for wimps I love commuting on my new Stumpjumper FSR Comp with knobblies. Mostly its roadies on their skinny tyres that overtake me, but I'm getting a better workout And I can jump gutters and go through parks and rough bits

  13. #13
    EXORCIZE
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    Be sure to tell your car insurance company you're commuting - probably save you some $$. Unless you're sure you're gonna do it every day, you might just tell them you use the bike 3 times/week.

    Also, if you stick with knobbies, I'd jack up the air pressure for commutes, then let it out for trail riding.

  14. #14
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    For 5 miles just ride what you have. I ride my 08 Trek EX8 to work everyday, about 8 miles each way. A little extra air and off I go.

  15. #15
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    I commute with a Kona Dawg, full squish and knobby tires. I only have a 3.5 mile commute one way with a big climb. I also have a road bike but prefer the Dawg for the commute. It usually takes me about 30 minutes with the Dawg or 20 with my roadie. Like Sean said, I can hit the trails on the way home if I want to.

  16. #16
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    Knobbies vs slicks does make a difference when you commute every day, even if it's just 10miles rt. I can't wait to replace my knobby studded tires with the slick 1.5" tires I run in summer. I have tried both, my mtb has Panaracer Cinder 2.25s and the winter tires on the commuter are Nokian W160s. I can still jump all the curbs I want with the 1.5" slicks.
    More importantly, I wouldn't like to expose my nice mtb to the hardship of daily commuting. My maintenance standard for it is way different than the standard for the beater commuter. Also the commuter has fenders and crap I don't want on the trail but do want on the commute. I'd buy a cheap beater hardtail, just make sure it fits. Run it on whatever tires it comes with, providing they're safe, and then get slicks when they're worn.
    I just feel that the commuter and the mtb are different beasts and can't really imagine using the same bike for both, unless it was just for the occasional commute. Unless you commute on ice or snow I'd even consider getting a road bike for the commute I use a mtb but that's mostly because I have a better selection of studded tires that way. Plus it was sitting around after I upgraded the mtb.

  17. #17
    Double-metric mtb man
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    Sure, if you'd like to cut some time off and ride just road, switching to slicks on the mtb will speed things up. I commute on my fs mtb on a regular basis. Main reason is that I have to option of dropping on to multi-use trails (MUT's) and singletrack on the way home that are a lot easier with knobby tires.

    For long distance road stuff (like a Century if you're psycho enough to want to try it on a mtb), slicks are definitely the way to go.

    FWIW, during the summer, I have a SS converted roadie that will see more time as a commuter bike. In the winter, mtb is the only way to go in Alberta
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  18. #18
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    I commuted for over a year on my Blur, with full knobbies. The only difference was that I bumped the pressure in the tires up to the max. Worked 100% fine for my 20 mile round trip. I tried the commute to my current job a few times on the blur, 40 mile round trip. It did the job 100% fine too. If you can handle riding for hours in the dirt, riding in the street is only easier. The only think a road bike will do for you is allow you to go faster. For reference, my fastest commute home (10 mile ride) on the mtb was 29mins and change, road bike was 26mins an change. 3 mins in a race is a big deal, on a commute, not so much.

    BM
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  19. #19
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    I'm commuting my 2007 Moment 10 miles a day. Don't need slicks, don't need a separate bike for the road. I pedal as hard and as fast as I can and hit everything I see.

  20. #20
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    I picked up the Gary Fisher for 75 bucks. The bikes in pretty good shape everything works it has 1.5 slicks on it now and the guy threw in a set of used 2.1 nevegals to boot. Now I just need to pick up some pedals and I am good to go.
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  21. #21
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    That's perfect, congrats.

  22. #22
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    I've done everything from run up to the local KFC for some snackers (a little under a mile the way I go, I think), to commuting to school (1.5 miles each way, there abouts), to riding to the local trails about 2 miles away, to riding up to some of the bike shops between 3 and 4 miles away and yaking at the shop peeps for a bit. I haven't made any post-office runs or random errands on the bike yet, but it wouldn't be that much different from what I do now anyway
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  23. #23
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    I commuted 20miles round trip on my GF cake. Bought cheapy Performance 1.5 slicks. I only had to buy three tires total over those 5 months. Lost one to a biggish cut.

  24. #24
    Don't skid
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    Quote Originally Posted by Idriver
    I picked up the Gary Fisher for 75 bucks. The bikes in pretty good shape everything works it has 1.5 slicks on it now and the guy threw in a set of used 2.1 nevegals to boot. Now I just need to pick up some pedals and I am good to go.
    Nice find. Slicks make a big difference. If you are carrying any gear at all (like a rain jacket/wind breaker, lights, lock, pump, tube) I would suggest investing in a rear rack and some panniers. It nice not to have to ride with a backpack everywhere (especially if you sweat like a pig like i do). Plus I have a Jandd trunk bag http://www.jandd.com/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=FRRPE

    that sits on top of the rear rack. It holds a 6-pack of double IPA just fine (and yes it ONLY holds double IPA).


    Oh, i like your avatar.
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  25. #25
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    I commute on my....

    MTB and have been for years. Living in the midwest and great plains areas all my life, we have winter! And winter means pot holes, cracked pavement etc. Riding a roadie, hybrid or other "skinny tired" bike is a big no go! I use a 2.0 lightly treaded tire, not a slick or a baldy. Something with just enough tread to provide traction when it rains, the weather man ain't always right around here! If I had the oportunity to take dirt on my route I'd commute on knobbies too. But something with tead is a MUST. A slick or a baldy is just too sketchy if things turn wet.

    The suggestions of the other posters are spot on for the most part. If you have a place to change wear cycling clothing. Keeps your work clothes fresh and is more comfortable when it gets hot out. Panniers or a "trunk rack" of some kind is also and excellent suggestion. Back packs or messenger bags are okay, but they do raise the center of gravity a bit and can be a nusiance if you have to ride much over 20 minutes or so. The straps etc. can chafe and having the weight on your shoulders and upper body can become tiresome. Also at least carry lights! Especially if you may end up working overtime to the point that it may be dark on the ride home. You don't need anything fancy, just a good battery operated red LED rear and a strong front light so you can see are all that is needed. The front is more important though. Even with street lights etc. visibility is still very limited. So a good strong front light that lets you see for some distance is a good idea.

    Other than that, go for it! Commuting on an MTB is often much more comfortable. Not as efficient as a road or hybrid. But you don't run near the risk of crashing due to pot holes or cracks in the pavement. I've seen guys on road bikes tossed to the pavement by stuff I just roll over and don't even know is there. Commuting on a mountain bike is fun and a smidge safer IMHO.

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  26. #26
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    Aside from safety features, like lights, reflective tape, bell and such, the biggest thing for a commuter is good, full, fenders. Something like the PlanetBike Freddy Fenders, the Hardcore or Arcadia would be great. Not something you'd want on a trail bike obviously. Having a dry butt and dry feet on rainy days makes all the difference. Really makes any day a rideable day.
    Unless you are lucky enough to have dirt trails on your commute, slick tires will be best. For asphalt use any thread is unnecessary, even in the rain. That's not just my opinion, the late, great Sheldon Brown gave us the definite truth of this matter. RIP Sheldon Brown.
    A rack and panniers can also be good to have. The bell (the louder the better) is good to alert pedestrians.
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  27. #27
    The plough
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    True that. MTB is very good for commuting, but something you wrote is not entirely correct:

    Quote Originally Posted by Squash
    But something with tead is a MUST. A slick or a baldy is just too sketchy if things turn wet.
    Knobby tires or tires with tread are far WORSE in wet than slicks... on bicycles. Bicycles do not aquaplane - narrow tire width combined with slow rotational speed does not allow it. Cars and motorbikes do, otherwise they would also only use slicks as slick tires provide the most contact with the road surface. Observe the car or motorbike races. The treaded tires only come on when its wet to channel the water away, not to increase grip through some other means.

    V.

  28. #28
    ballbuster
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    Dunno about you....

    Quote Originally Posted by Idriver
    I am going to be commuting to work by use of my fs trail bike and I was wondering how many other people do this. I have gotten to the point where spending 3.25 / gallon of gas is getting to be a bit much. I dont have the budget right now for a commuting specific bike. My ride is only going to be about 5 miles mostly main roads.

    ... but I kinda hated riding on pavement with dirt knobs. It's not so much the slow roll (training resistance) but it was the squirm when you lay it in a turn at speed. Slicks are great for this. You can hear them start to sizzle when you get close to the limits of traction. I kinda liked riding my CX bike to work with the beefy CX rims and Kenda Kwick 30c CX light knob tires. I liked the cush, and I would hit the 500 feet of singletrack on my route to work.

    Dunno if the price (in dollars) of gas is putting me off driving, but the lack of cycling miles. Of course as we all know, there is the REAL price of gas....

  29. #29
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    been commuting on my full suspension going on three years now, 3 miles each way...you need to buy some cheap lights...
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  30. #30
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    Ride what you've got

    I say just give it a shot with what you've got. You'll figure out pretty quick what you want to improve/change about your ride and what works as-is. I do have a commuter specific hardtail but I also use it on light sigletrack. The biggest plus of a commuter specific bike are fenders, lights and tires. My favorite tire for situations where I want to ride the streets but might want to hit a singletrack or two on the way home are WTB "All Terrainasaurus" tires. They work well on dry singletrack and don't slow you down much on the streets. Bottom line, just start riding I'll bet you'll love it.

  31. #31
    is buachail foighneach me
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    Quote Originally Posted by vmajor
    True that. MTB is very good for commuting, but something you wrote is not entirely correct:



    Knobby tires or tires with tread are far WORSE in wet than slicks... on bicycles. Bicycles do not aquaplane - narrow tire width combined with slow rotational speed does not allow it. Cars and motorbikes do, otherwise they would also only use slicks as slick tires provide the most contact with the road surface. Observe the car or motorbike races. The treaded tires only come on when its wet to channel the water away, not to increase grip through some other means.

    V.
    i completely disagree based on personal experience. slicks have far less braking traction in the rain than semislicks or knobbies. especially on oily city streets(like where i have lived), but even on rural roads(like where i live now). having multiple, smaller contact patches will increase the amount of pressure on each contact patch, which will increase the amount that the rubber is able to conform to the surface of the road for grip. a slick tire is far, far more likely to spin while standing climbing, and slip while turning or braking in the rain than a tire with tread because it disperses the riders weight over a greater surface area and conforms to the surface of the road less, providing less rolling resistance, and subsequently, less traction in wet conditions. a knobby tire also has a greater likely hood of recatching on one set of knobs if another set slips. a slick tire slips and it will just keep slipping till the surface changes.

  32. #32
    All That is Man
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    It really comes down to what you want your ride to be like. With knobbies, I could only pace at about 13-14mph. With the slicks, I will pace at 17-19mph on flat ground. This is for a 17 mile commute ea/way. If you're doing 5 miles or less, you're only talking about 15 minutes of riding at a hard pace on a mtn bike with road tires.

    I do agree that you should do the ride a few times and start figuring out what you want to change & spend money on to make it easier/quicker/more enjoyable.
    John

  33. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Idriver
    I picked up the Gary Fisher for 75 bucks. The bikes in pretty good shape everything works it has 1.5 slicks on it now and the guy threw in a set of used 2.1 nevegals to boot. Now I just need to pick up some pedals and I am good to go.
    Good job. I think you'll love commuting by bike. I started last year and I don't know why I waited this long. Best change I ever did for myself. I would HIGHLY suggest a rack and pannier (arkel commuter) is what I have. I just got them both about 2 months ago and have been loving them. A good set of lights from your LBS and your good to go. I have a road mountain bike and FS. Once the salt is cleaned up, the FS comes out. I lock the rear shock and i'm good to go!!!!

  34. #34
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    don't waste your knobby tires on the road, get some dece semi slicks or slicks.

  35. #35

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    Late to this thread, but to chime in: as per others, just get going with what you've got, then work out what you want.
    FWIW, I've been a 3+ season commuter (every day) by mtb since '02, when I took up cycling again for health reasons (I'm old, etc!). Now averaging about 5000kms/year (commute + occasional light trail rides). I started with a (cheap) mtb, and have stayed with it; now using a pretty nice h/t with lots 'o upgraded bits, discs (love 'em) etc. My experience:
    1. like another poster above, we have WINTER >> the roads here (and the river-side mup) are pretty much like tech. singletrack. I've tried (three times now) to 'talk' myself into a road, 'cross or fast hybrid (Oh, I'll be soooo much faster etc.) -- uh uh. Each time (thanks to my lbs) I've been able to undo a potential mistake. Mtb's make a LOT of sense for commuting in traffic/on bad roads.
    2. Knobbies v. road tires: fwiw, you will not corner or brake on-road as well on knobbies as on a slick or touring-tread tire. Simple physics. Off-road is of course different. My preference is for the classic 'touring' tires, e.g. Panaracer Pasela TG 1.75". These are great on the road, and work very well on dry hardpack trails.
    3. Full-suspension is perhaps too much, but if you have it, who cares. OTOH, I like (good) front suspension, again -- given our road conditions. Can't count the number of times it's helped me avoid damage to bike or self from an unavoidable pothole hit (this will happen if you ride in heavy traffic). Rigid fork is more efficient and lighter, but I'll take the trade-off.
    4. Again, fwiw, discs if possible. Saves on rim wear, cleaning-type maintenance -- just all around easier/more efficient in the wet, etc.
    5. But above all, just get started!!

  36. #36
    i like rocks
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    this has been my daily commuter for the last year. hop on and go. dress for the conditions.


  37. #37
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    I ride 3.5 miles one way on road and I picked up a cheap 4300 trek from the LBS for $350. I figure with my jeep wrangler, not driving to class each day would pay for the bike pretty quickly. I added a front mud flap and rear mud flap, and some cheapo LED's for the rear and the front and a nice reflective coat so the red necks here in southeastern Ohio can see me when they are flying at 65 mph on route 50 in the mornings.

    I ride with the knobbies that came on my 4300 stock. I have had no problems and I like the ride. I have two routes to get to college; route 50 along the highway on the berm (scary as **** sometimes!) or I can ride the back country roads. It is an uphill climb for about 2.3 miles, then a downhill around a twisty, winding road, then old brick and gravel roads for another 1 mile or so, then side walk.

    The back way is scary too because the cars drive in the middle of the road because the roads are narrow, but I enjoy getting some riding time in and it's hard to get that time in with having clinic and work all day, class in the evenings, and trying to get homework done.

  38. #38
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    I'm late to the party, but the commuter bike was a nice find. Congrats! I would love to find a commuter bike like that someday. I may have to turn my Giant Yukon into a commuter in the future.

  39. #39
    GAME ON!
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    i commute on my mkiii setup for trail. only 9 miles total, but it gets me there.
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  40. #40

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    I would say, it would depend on your geography, and fitness, i live in Reno, NV and started commuting on a 35 lb (tricked out) mountain bike, that winter i spent 10 days in the hospital with pneumonia, i then bought a 24 lb Kona Jake and No problems the next winter.

  41. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zero Signal
    It really comes down to what you want your ride to be like. With knobbies, I could only pace at about 13-14mph. With the slicks, I will pace at 17-19mph on flat ground. This is for a 17 mile commute ea/way. If you're doing 5 miles or less, you're only talking about 15 minutes of riding at a hard pace on a mtn bike with road tires.

    I do agree that you should do the ride a few times and start figuring out what you want to change & spend money on to make it easier/quicker/more enjoyable.
    Did you change your tires size on your computer?

  42. #42
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    Ordered some Bontrager invert K tires to put on my 29er so I can leave the Madone safe at home.

  43. #43
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    Just picked up a couple new comuters for me and the wife Kona smoke 29r for me comes with fenders and its only 350 new and a Kona dew for the wife. The smoke it awesome just for the sole fact that it come with the fenders

  44. #44
    PM Me for Wood Fenders
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    When I commuted on my MTB I went for a semi-slick on the rear, bontrager revolt and a hutch python on the front. Plenty of traction when it was needed but very low rolling resistance.
    The wood is being bent! Let me know what you need!

  45. #45
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    UK pays roughly $8 a gallon and the streets are still packed with cars
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  46. #46
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    Im about to start doing the same thing. MTB about 5 miles to work. I am putting on the Maxxis Holly Roller tires, a good cross between knobby and slick.

    I thought about getting a road bike but what about when you have to hop up on curbs or go around someones dog taking a dump? MTB is a little more versitile but we will see...

    I just gotta get a thing for the back to put a bag on w/ my work clothes/shoes

  47. #47
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    For people who are both commuters and "sport bikers" I strongly believe in getting a separate commuter. There's all sorts of stuff on my commuter I just don't want on my mountain bike (or my road bikes either), such as a rack, fenders, bell, lights etc. I also find that my standard of maintenance is much higher for the bikes I ride for fun than for the commuter. The work needed to keep the commuter up to fun bike standards would simply be prohibitive. Being a year round commuter probably has something to do with that, I would not want to expose my nice bikes to what I expose the commuter to. It's just that maintaining bikes is not my hobby, even if I do all my own work. The commuter gets its chain oiled regularly and washed a couple of times a year. Otherwise I don't really touch it unless something breaks. The fun bikes are kept pretty immaculate, although I'm not religious about washing the mountain bike after every ride.
    My commuter is a mountain bike, to be able to fit good studs in winter and hop curbs in summer. I run W160s or W240s in winter and 1.5 slicks in summer. The road bikes are faster in summer but I haven't managed to justify separate commuters for winter and summer yet

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Idriver
    I am going to be commuting to work by use of my fs trail bike and I was wondering how many other people do this. I have gotten to the point where spending 3.25 / gallon of gas is getting to be a bit much. I dont have the budget right now for a commuting specific bike. My ride is only going to be about 5 miles mostly main roads.
    Yeah...only mine is a hardtail beater I tossed slicks on.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by arnijr
    For people who are both commuters and "sport bikers" I strongly believe in getting a separate commuter. There's all sorts of stuff on my commuter I just don't want on my mountain bike (or my road bikes either), such as a rack, fenders, bell, lights etc. I also find that my standard of maintenance is much higher for the bikes I ride for fun than for the commuter. The work needed to keep the commuter up to fun bike standards would simply be prohibitive. Being a year round commuter probably has something to do with that, I would not want to expose my nice bikes to what I expose the commuter to. It's just that maintaining bikes is not my hobby, even if I do all my own work. The commuter gets its chain oiled regularly and washed a couple of times a year. Otherwise I don't really touch it unless something breaks. The fun bikes are kept pretty immaculate, although I'm not religious about washing the mountain bike after every ride.
    My commuter is a mountain bike, to be able to fit good studs in winter and hop curbs in summer. I run W160s or W240s in winter and 1.5 slicks in summer. The road bikes are faster in summer but I haven't managed to justify separate commuters for winter and summer yet

    The best for BOTH worlds is a Cross bike. If you are looking for a do it all, check out Surly Cross Check.
    The wood is being bent! Let me know what you need!

  50. #50
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    fs mtb's arent very terrific for riding position, but, i also ride about 5-6 kms (3mi) to my local dh trails. eats up tires, but, if you like xc riding, a shock with lockout helps a heck of a lot, i dont like riding rigid on bumpy singletrack.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Idriver
    I am going to be commuting to work by use of my fs trail bike and I was wondering how many other people do this. I have gotten to the point where spending 3.25 / gallon of gas is getting to be a bit much. I dont have the budget right now for a commuting specific bike. My ride is only going to be about 5 miles mostly main roads.
    3.25 a gallon would be extremely cheap where i am. our going rate is around 3.70

  52. #52
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    Like Pucstopr30, I have a 2007 Fuel EX8 and ride it twice a week to work. I had a '97 S-Works hardtail before but gave it to my cousin so he could use it for college. Sometimes, I wish I still had the S-Works... Anyway, commuting on the EX8 has not been bad at all since it has a lockout feature for the fork and rear shock. A little extra air in the tires and I'm good to go. Besides, commuting 10 miles each way with a FS mtb and knobbies is good training for me. Like many others have said, give it a try and go from there... Good luck!

  53. #53
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    I Just got a FS mountain bike too, that i plan to try to commute on from time to time.

    I think if i get intp regular commuting, i might set up a whole extra set of wheels for road use, then a set for the trails.

    I figure if i can find a really cheap wheelset I'll do it, the biggest problem, is that they need to be disc compatable, and i'll have to pick up an extra cassette and rotors. I guess all that would still be cheaper than a new commuter bike.

  54. #54
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    I'm planning on getting a second wheelset and road tires (Schwalbe Big Apple) soon. Then I don't have to worry about wearing out my MTB tires when I ride roads, as I hate road bikes, but enjoy road rides too. When I ride roads with knobbies, I just look at it as extra exercise. My bike is also a hardtail, which helps on road, as FS sucks up more pedal power.

  55. #55

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    MTB commuter, Specialized Hardrock Comp Disc, and believe me, my commute is tougher on the bike than any local trails. Where I am now, it is apparent that city planners had no idea that bicycles exist, so I am constantly transitioning from road to dirt/grass to sidewalk. I am an all season commuter; when the slosh is flying @ 27 degrees, the wind is howling @ 17 degrees or the sun is beating down @ 90 my MTB gets all it needs and then some.

    Pot holes, busted sidewalks, insane/ignorant motorists... Yeah, I've also been hit this years as well. Wear your protection like it's your religion, because it will save you when praying won't.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by euroford
    this has been my daily commuter for the last year. hop on and go. dress for the conditions.



    I just bought these tires, gonna get them on this weekend hopefully!!!!!
    they look pretty cool, hopefully will roll better

  57. #57
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    Those look like they would roll better. can you use em on the trail too?

  58. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandontw
    Those look like they would roll better. can you use em on the trail too?
    If you're asking about the HRCD... then yes, they hold their own on every trail that I've ridden, and are very recommended here on the boards.

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by WrenchDevil6
    If you're asking about the HRCD... then yes, they hold their own on every trail that I've ridden, and are very recommended here on the boards.
    I was talking about those tires...

  60. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandontw
    I was talking about those tires...
    Tires on the HRCD are awesome and yes.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by ohannon7
    Im about to start doing the same thing. MTB about 5 miles to work. I am putting on the Maxxis Holly Roller tires, a good cross between knobby and slick.
    Great tire - I have them in a 2.4. They are SUPER fast compared to the 2.35 nevegal DTC that I have run on my other bike, and feel even faster than any knobby tire i have run. They work well for hardpack and pavement. Great compromise, provide some cushion, not entirely slick.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by CharacterZero
    Great tire - I have them in a 2.4. They are SUPER fast compared to the 2.35 nevegal DTC that I have run on my other bike, and feel even faster than any knobby tire i have run. They work well for hardpack and pavement. Great compromise, provide some cushion, not entirely slick.
    so what tires are they? maxxis what?

  63. #63
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    Yeah, those are Maxxis (holy roller). Also at similar price-point, check the kenda short tracker and k-rad, both available in multiple sizes. they won't be as light as a 1.9 slick, but will provide a bit of cushion.
    I run my Holy rollers at 60psi fwiw on the road.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by CharacterZero
    Yeah, those are Maxxis (holy roller). Also at similar price-point, check the kenda short tracker and k-rad, both available in multiple sizes. they won't be as light as a 1.9 slick, but will provide a bit of cushion.
    I run my Holy rollers at 60psi fwiw on the road.
    sweet thanks for the info.

    these k-rads look pretty sweet! and the price is right too!

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...-Rad+Tire.aspx

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    I ride my spesh enduro sl as a commuter switching back and forth between knobs and slicks (as time allows after riding in the dirt). My only concern is the wear and tear on the pivots, components etc from the road grime. I usually give the frame a quick rinse with the hose upon returning home. I would like a commuter specific bike if only to prevent my baby from getting abused by the evils of road riding. I certainly feel safer on the knobbies, and looking at the enduro with skinnies is comical enough to amke you crash from laughing too much.

    The only issue I have had with riding a full squishy bike is finding a front fender that works for my talas 36. I ended up using my rear fender mounted to the stem to block the blinding spray, leaving my backside exposed to the ugly brown stripe from the rear wheel.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by CharacterZero
    Great tire - I have them in a 2.4. They are SUPER fast compared to the 2.35 nevegal DTC that I have run on my other bike, and feel even faster than any knobby tire i have run. They work well for hardpack and pavement. Great compromise, provide some cushion, not entirely slick.
    Just started commuting today and got the tires on over the weekend, I am really happy w/ them. Treking w/ the knobby's on would really suck. I have the 2.4's too, they feel great, very stable

  67. #67
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    depends entirely on the length of your commute.

    0-3 miles, mountain bike with knobbies
    3-10, mountain bike with road wheelset
    10+, get a separate bike.

    just my opinion, of course. i currently commute 1.3 miles on my mountain bike w/ knobbies. the tiny amount of wear and increased rolling resistance isn't worth getting a 2nd wheelset, adjusting my derailleur, etc.

  68. #68
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    ^valid point. I have about a 10 mile round trip. I had to get some semi-slicks on there (BMX tread)

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    excellent, glad they are working out for you.
    it was that difference that sold me on the whole "rolling resistance is more important than weight" idea - cuz I know the 2.4 steel beaded holy rollers are not leightweight, but they are fast!

  70. #70
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    Do you think the K-rads or the Holy rollers would be better for a 50/50 mix of trail and street?

    I'll be riding to work every day, but strictly trail on the weekends. I'm going to get a set of one of these tires.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandontw
    Do you think the K-rads or the Holy rollers would be better for a 50/50 mix of trail and street?

    I'll be riding to work every day, but strictly trail on the weekends. I'm going to get a set of one of these tires.
    I think if you are riding hardpack, sure. I think if it was loose over hardpack you would probably want knobs on the sidewals to dig in - something more like the short tracker

  72. #72
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    I've been using the Holy Rollers on my commuter for almost a year and I am totally happy with them, a great tire, low rolling resistance and in the folding version, not too heavy either. I have used them also for light trail riding and I havent noticed that they slide or anything, mud gets them a little sketchy but hey, its no mud tire.

  73. #73
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    Get a $80 bike on craigslist. If it happens to get stolen, you'd only be out $80 rather than your main ride.

    At 5miles, a push scooter shouldn't break a sweat on a rider.

  74. #74
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    I just found and old road bike with new tires and seat for 40$

    I plan to strip the gears off and make it a single speed, uglify it with some stickers and duct tape, and it should ride fine, and be so ugly that the probability of it getting stolen will be slim to none.

    Its got slightly rusty everything, so i think maximum ugliness will be pretty easily achieved. I'm pretty excited about it actually. Should be a fun project, and fun bike to ride.

  75. #75
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    I just got this - 2007 Giant Rincon a couple of weeks ago. I didn't think I was going to like the tires, not really a knobby - mountain tire. But I've ridden it on the road and xc trails - so far I like them. In fact I was thinking about using it to commute to work - the roads here are nasty and would probably hold up better - but with a 35 mile round trip - the road bike will be faster.
    IMG_0058a_edited-1.jpg

    IMG_0063a.jpg

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by trek7100
    I just got this - 2007 Giant Rincon a couple of weeks ago. I didn't think I was going to like the tires, not really a knobby - mountain tire. But I've ridden it on the road and xc trails - so far I like them. In fact I was thinking about using it to commute to work - the roads here are nasty and would probably hold up better - but with a 35 mile round trip - the road bike will be faster.
    IMG_0058a_edited-1.jpg

    IMG_0063a.jpg
    I am running maxxis holy roller, very similar to those...really like them on the road - don't feel anything like a knobby.

  77. #77
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    OP here, I took the slicks off. It just doesnt feel right to me and besides there are a few dirt paths on the way home with a couple small jumps that are allitle sketchy on slicks.

    Besides it's only a 25 minute ride anyway.
    LIVE TO RIDE - RIDE TO LIVE

  78. #78
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    If you're starting off to set up a commuting bike, a hardtail MTB is a really good start. You want to be able to add a rear cargo rack so you can put any cargo load on the bike and not so much on your back. It's hard to do that with a full suspension bike. (If The Bike You Have is already FS, then you can still easily carry your stuff in a backpack or messenger bag). Your rack can be used to strap stuff directly to it, to support a rack trunk, or panniers of various sorts.

    As for tires, it's up to you. If your route is all paved, put on slick tires for less rolling resistance. If you've got dirt road or single track on the route, leave on the knobbies.

    My route is about 6 miles of pavement and a mile of lightly graveled double or single track. I started off last year commuting with my FS 29er, and a backpack. I switched over to a regular city commuter with 700x38 slicks, which is great for the paved part of the route, but when I hit that last stretch of track, I miss my knobbies... I've taken to going a little longer way around (another two miles) to avoid that stretch when I'm using the city bike. The MTBs are still in standby mode for rainy days, winter, and high water. I added a rear rack to my Rockhopper specifically to tote stuff around and ultimately do a little MTB touring, the FS 29er pretty well requires that I use a backpack or messenger bag. (Yes, I tried a seatpost-mounted rack, which works provided that I lock out the rear suspension or stay on clean pavement...)

  79. #79

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    I do 10 mile round trips everyday with my giant stp, a dirt jumping bike...it has 2.4" knobby tires, and weighs ~35-40 lbs...my legs have been complaining, but it definitely has gotten stronger, so just go for it.

  80. #80
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    leave the knobbies on it'll save you some money and the look on a roadies face when you come up on him then pass him is priceless.

  81. #81
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    I've done single speed road bikes and fs Mountain bike commuting over the years, both are awesomely fun. When I ride my road bike, I get made when I can't ride on trails I pass by, and when I ride my mountain bike, I get frustrated when passed by roadies.

    Either way, high pressure rules! Have fun.
    Just Ride!

  82. #82
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    I posted up earlier, that both skinny and full knobs are fun, but I've found that once I started riding my singlespeed road bike, I never want to commute with my mountain bike any more. I think the time savings and ease of pedaling must weigh in subonciously somehow.
    Just Ride!

  83. #83
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    If I only had a 5 mile ride I'd be commuting every day on my mountain bike, knobby tires and all. My ride to work is 42km's one way up and down lots of steep hills. I already made that trip twice just to see if I could do it, but since I just got into biking again and I'm not in shape yet i'm definitely not up to it. Not to mention it takes at least 2hrs and this time of year its still pitch black when I start work at 7am. Riding through dark wooded areas at night is kind of spooky when your not used to it lol.

  84. #84
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    It's great to see so many other folks commuting on MTBs. I've been riding them exclusively, on and off for years so they are always my choice for any situation. MTBs are adaptable to almost any type of riding situation. I prefer their narrow wheelbase, high clearance and maneuverability over any so-called commuter/comfort bike and I doubt that will ever change.

    I don't see any problem with commuting on a FS bike, just set the pre-load higher! I love my Trek rigid that I ride now, but I'd love to have a bike with suspension. Even on well-maintained streets, you still have potholes, bumps, cracks, dips, grates, manhole covers, tar strips, dirt, gravel, debris from accidents, duff from trees and other roadway hazards. It can be annoying sometimes, but it also makes riding interesting.

    There are a lot of different schools of thought on tires, I say do whatever you're most comfortable with! Knobbies (and extra weight from suspension, disc brakes, etc) really do make pedaling harder, but think of it as "resistance training." And if you're riding an older bike that you're not going to be taking off-road much, wear probably won't be much of a concern. I'd like to get some road tires for my bike, but for now I need to build my strength and stamnina back up as soon as possible.

    Keep pedaling!
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  85. #85
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    Why not some road biased mtb tires? Swapping tires only takes a few minutes. Ritchey Tom Slicks are like $17 each. http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...e.cfm?SKU=1443

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    I've been commuting to work for about 6 months now ever since moving a little a mile away from my workplace. I love it! My old Rockhopper is at the bike shop right now getting some tires a little more friendly to the commute (not full blown slicks but something similiar to the tires in the above post) as well as a new set of shifters. Been riding the new 29er to work the past couple of weeks but looking forward to going back to the 26 rockhopper to see how it works out on the commutes.

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScareyH22A
    Why not some road biased mtb tires? Swapping tires only takes a few minutes. Ritchey Tom Slicks are like $17 each. http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...e.cfm?SKU=1443
    Thanks for the tip Scarey. I get paid this Friday, so I probably am going to invest in some road tires (and maybe some better grips).
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

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    I have a 10-mile commute each way. I don't mind the weight and resistance as much as the speed.

    Sorry, but I use my road bike for transportation and my new MTB for fun.

  89. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by nattybohfiend
    I have a 10-mile commute each way. I don't mind the weight and resistance as much as the speed.

    Sorry, but I use my road bike for transportation and my new MTB for fun.
    Hey, as long as you're biking it, that's all that matters.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

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    As for grips... that's really up to you. But I recently bought some Ergon GP1-L and they're probably the single most comfort enhancing bit on my bike besides a soft saddle.



    They're $28 https://www.rei.com/product/722554

    The instruction says to mount it horizontal to the floor but I find that angling it down a little bit makes a whole world of difference. To find the sweet spot, lightly tighten the allen bolt and pedal around and slowly angle as desired. Then tighten it down when you've got it comfortable.

    Apparently there's a pretty big following on these because they're so comfortable. They come in a smaller size and even different styles with bar ends and such. https://www.ergon-bike.com/us/grips/...4u071ubb61qud5

  91. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScareyH22A
    As for grips... that's really up to you. But I recently bought some Ergon GP1-L and they're probably the single most comfort enhancing bit on my bike besides a soft saddle.



    They're $28 https://www.rei.com/product/722554

    The instruction says to mount it horizontal to the floor but I find that angling it down a little bit makes a whole world of difference. To find the sweet spot, lightly tighten the allen bolt and pedal around and slowly angle as desired. Then tighten it down when you've got it comfortable.

    Apparently there's a pretty big following on these because they're so comfortable. They come in a smaller size and even different styles with bar ends and such. https://www.ergon-bike.com/us/grips/...4u071ubb61qud5
    I've seen those, and they're quite tempting! I have read though that people complain that you can't get a tight grip on the handlebars with them when climbing a steep hills and I do have a few of those on my ride home.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

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    About the Ergon mounting angle: someone said the flats should be parallel to your forearm. That works best for me.

    I guess if you are standing up and mashing on the uphills the Ergons would not be as good as a cylindrical grip.

  93. #93
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    BTW, if you pick up a set of Ritchey Tom Slicks, you'll immediately notice how much faster they are on the road than any dirt tire, especially because you can inflate them to 85lbs. Also, if the bead doesn't seat properly, use a little soap water along the edge and it'll bead fine.

  94. #94
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    Cool thread.

    I commute on my FS mountain bike - threw a set of Hookworms @ 60 psi on, I'm flying. Relatively flat commute, about 5 miles.

    Good times.
    Quote Originally Posted by azdog View Post
    I think he was born around the time of the Chernobyl fallout which would explain a lot.

  95. #95
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    I just tried my first commute on a mountain bike and nearly killed myself. My regular commute (10 miles) is typically done on my Trek Soho rigid frame "urban" bike. I can generally knock down the 5.3 mile commute in about 18 minutes or so one way with a couple pretty steep hills along the way. Today I attempted it on my full suspension Gary Fisher F4, which I have been prepping for winter commuting duty. Although I have some 1.5 slicks on the way they arent here yet. Let me just say that my commute was about 5 minutes longer and I was miserable on the climbs with the MTB. I had the rear shock locked out, but the long travel front Judy C shocks were absorbing a BUNCH of my pedal stroke (they probably have weak springs). Combine that with the extra weight of the Joshua, and the big knobby tires and it wasnt a fun experience.

    I recently scooped up a very nice shape Nishiki hard tail frame to replace it with and hopefully that along with the 1.5 slicks will help commuting matters a great deal. I love the concept of MTB commuting, but I am still working out the bugs in my personal program.

  96. #96
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    I've been commuting for several months now, and recently went from a rigid frame and fork, to a rigid with front suspension, to a FS Gary Fisher HiFi 29, and would never go back to any of the rigid choices. I switch out the knobbies for a set of 700x42 Conti Borough street tires during the week and I can keep with most other cyclists. The suspension is nice as I have to ride the sidewalks and other less forgiving areas. With both front and rear suspension set to firm I'm not having any appreciable suspension movement while pedaling, so it's like a hardtail until I hit some of the rough stuff. At least from my seat, I don't miss the hardtail for any reason.

  97. #97
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    Hmmph.. I will see how it goes. I just swapped my fisher full suspension frame out for a solid frame Nishiki. I really enjoy it much more so far, but then I do a bunch of road riding and no sidewalk or off road commuting. I also have some pretty aggressive hills and supplement my MTB commuting with a road bike. I think a non-suspended, light MTB will fit the bill for my specific purpose, but as you mentioned there may be good reasons to go FS as well.

  98. #98
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    i use my mountain bike for my 28 mile roundtrip work commute and i love it. i ride a 29er ti indyfab fully rigid 8 speed and i use it for all of my offroad and racing as well. i don't bother to change wheels or tires for the commute. the michelin xc at 2.0 29er tire is the most durable out there and i only went through 2 sets in over 5000 miles of commuting, riding and racing last year. if i raced road, i'd ride a road bike, but since i don't, i won't.
    enjoy the commute!
    rog

  99. #99

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    I have the best commuter mountain bike ever!

    http://www.velocycle.com

    This canadian manufacturer is rocking out with their unique concept of a alacarte bicycles!

    Buy direct! Each bike is built according to each customer. We can choose what ever component to be built to our bike & we pay dealer cost price on the complete assembly, no labor charge for assembly!

    I am very happy that this shop moved from being a canadian suspension service center, to the best hybrid manufacturer, this meets my needs like there is no tomorow!

    Being there customer for a long time now, I can tell they still do some "push industries" style services for about half the price, but according to my last visit to the shop, serious business change is going on over there, & can't know exactly for now, but something is going on for sure, something big.

    No susrprise, YR is the record holder of 15000+ Fox suspension rebuilds for Canada, & Velocycle is not any more offering any fox suspensions on their bikes. Is something need to be understood here?, maybe. For my part, there is no question I will use a fox suspension any more. This shop is my unique guide to cycling satisfaction. There before & aftersale service has never been equaled by any other shop I dealt with, from any fields of activity.

    My best advice: get to know one of the gods of cycling: Velocycle!

    I put 700C on my bike for winter & commuting, swap to 26" for mountain & swap for 24" for urban assault! Never seen any other bike like this in the world. It is just perfect for me!

    Yellowboy, master of commuting since 32 years.

    mutantxc belvedere.jpg

  100. #100
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    I commute on my MTB just for fun, or if I plan on hitting some trails after work. It's a long commute so it takes a lot longer, but it's still enjoyable. I can bomb off curbs and get dirty, whereas my roadie cannot


  101. #101
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    The main reason I prefer slicks to knobbies is that slicks are much cheaper than knobbies, and knobbies wear faster on the road. I mean, c'mon.....it only takes a couple of minutes to switch out 2 tires (well, it does for my old-school tube using a$$ is tubeless not worth the hassle/mess of swapping as needed ??? I truly have no idea, as tubes have served me fine all my ridin' life....that'd be, mmmmmmmmmmm.....45 years, at least, of 2 wheelin' goodness with tubed tires...LOL))

  102. #102
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    I'm in the same boat as the OP. I ride a Rocky Mountain fusion for mountain biking. I've ridden it to work a few times but want to start commuting all the time. I bought a Gary Fisher Hi Fi Deluxe and my wife says i need to commute to work now to make up for the cost. I could probably afford a commuter but i live in an apartment. I dont have room for 3 bikes of my own plus my wifes. I barely have room for 2.

    So I want to turn my Rocky Mountain into a commuter. I'm thinking of getting some different tires. But I might just leave them for now. I have kenda nevegals 2.1 on there right now and i've ridden them all season and they are a bit worn down. I might just ride them until they are totally worn down and then get new ones. I have to commute about 6 km and about 4-5 is paved and 1-2 is dirt and gravel doubletrack. But like i said sometimes i like to take a longer way home through singletrack just for fun. So i might keep the knobbies. I don't think i'll used my new fs fisher though. I think i'll save that just for trails.

    Anyone know of some good hybrid tires that aren't knobby like the nevegals but aren't totally slick? this seem to be problem a lot of people have. I don't want to kill my legs and tires riding the pavement but i also don't want to kill myself on the dirt/gravel section.

  103. #103
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    I just quickly skimmed through the post but 'm surprised at how many people commute with knobbies. I don't commute to work, impossible as I have a bout 700 lbs of tools to transport. The one thing I do though is ride from my house to the trail head. It is about a 4 km one way ride on pavement and it eats my tires like it's an all you can eat buffet. I would say spend the 20-30 dollars and some street tires and save money that way.

  104. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by CharacterZero
    I am running maxxis holy roller, very similar to those...really like them on the road - don't feel anything like a knobby.
    Anyone tried Kenda SB8? Which is better? Holly Roller or SB8? Thanks.

  105. #105
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    I currently have a dedicated commuter bike. It is a bridgestone mb-3 with a 1" slick rear and a 1.5 semi-slick front. There is a noticeable difference between it and my Ventana with full suspension and knobby tires. My commute is 17.5 miles each way. However, I will just grab which ever bike is ready at the time. The bike makes about 5 min difference on my ride.
    Oh sh!+ just force upgraded to cat1. Now what?
    Best thing about an ultra marathon? I just get to ride my bike for X hours!

  106. #106
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    Im planning to commute with my MTB, anyone tried Kend K-Rad or Maxxix Holly Roller? Which is better?

  107. #107
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    I've used both Holy Rollers and K-Rads for my freestyle MTB and currently have K-Rads on my 26" BMX cruiser I use for good weather commuting.
    In my experience, Holy Rollers last longer and have deeper tread but I've tried Holy Rollers in the snow and the square tread just gets packed in snow and you basically end up with slicks. I also seemed to get a lot of pinch flats with the HRs but if your not leaving the ground or you're a better rider, it shouldn't be an issue.
    K-Rads are cheaper and I like them for commuting. You can find them in crazy colors too.

  108. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by roel
    Im planning to commute with my MTB, anyone tried Kend K-Rad or Maxxix Holly Roller? Which is better?
    I don't know about either of those. I commute on WTB Nanoraptors. They're crazy cheap online and are pretty decent.

    Although this thread is old, I might as well mention that I commute on my mountain bike. It's not too far to work, and I have found a nice section that drops to a train track I get to ride every day. It only lasts a few seconds, but it's enough to make me a little happier on the way home.

  109. #109
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    I have one tubless SB 8 on the back of my commuter. I think its got about 1500 miles on it and its showing some wear down the center. The outside knobs looks brand new. It rolls fine when pumped to 60 psi. I have never tried the holy roller.

    -Simon
    Whiskey

  110. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by s0ckeyeus
    I have found a nice section that drops to a train track I get to ride every day. It only lasts a few seconds, but it's enough to make me a little happier on the way home.
    Any stretch where you can get off of pavement, not matter how short is refreshing.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  111. #111

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary the No-Trash Cougar
    I've seen those, and they're quite tempting! I have read though that people complain that you can't get a tight grip on the handlebars with them when climbing a steep hills and I do have a few of those on my ride home.

    I have these on my Cannondale. Ergon GC2



    comfy, and tight grip on the sides if you want it.

  112. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Audiofyl
    I have these on my Cannondale. Ergon GC2



    comfy, and tight grip on the sides if you want it.
    I eventually ended up with those grips as well. They are great for commuting and recreational rides. I do wish the bar-ends we a bit longer, though Ergon does now make a similar model with full size bar ends. I also have a pair on my 29er, without bar ends. They are a smaller size which makes them functional as a "technical" grip but still offer support for the heel of your hand.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  113. #113
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    Hi all! I have been commuting on my MTB since Nov. & really enjoying it It is 3.5 mi downhill to the closest busstop, or 7 additional flatter miles if I don't want to change buses (they have bike racks on the front). On the way home I take both buses & just go the 3.5 mi uphill. I was going to fix up my old bike for commuting but cannot bear to give up the disc brakes on front on the way downhill (about 1000' elevation drop), especially in the ice/snow where rimbrakes get sketchier -I'm finding I need the brakes a lot more than in good weather! My road turns to dirt the last 1.5 miles, but we call that "ice pavement" now, smoother than any other time of year. Super slick, studs 100% necessary, and if you stop on the hill you risk either wiping out because your shoes aren't studded, or having trouble starting uphill again on the ice. I use a Nokian studded on the rear & a homemade studded tire on the front. I bought a box of 1000 car tire studs (the shortest ones I could find) years ago, and mount them in any mtb tire that has beefy enough lugs to drill a 3/16" hole thru. You push them thru from the inside. They have amazing traction (carbide tips?), and wear great, being designed to hold up for miles on cars, but you do have more risk of flats than with the commercial snow tires - you need a tire liner of some sort to keep the flange on the back of the studs from eventually rubbing the tube & causing a flat. Not for the weight concious but I figure I'll feel like I'm flying when spring comes & I can take them, a few layers of clothes, and a few pounds of batteries off. Found a great pair of Kore lobster gloves with big gauntlets on ebay for $9.00 - really warm & super easy on/off if you need to do something. I think they were made for snowmobiling or motorcycles or something, not cycling. Coldest so far -6F, used the balaclava, facemask, skigoggles, & toe/handwarmer packets that day & was toasty - took that closer bus though!. With the uphill ride home I ditch a few layers in a pack after the wait at the busstop, unzip a few, and sometimes switch to a earwarmer band instead of hat, and cool weather MTB downhiller type gloves instead of the insulated lobstahs. I use a helmet lite from turbocat I had bought for night trailrides and lots of blinkies. I just received a replacement battery for my old vistalite nightstick handlebar lites from batteryspace.com; if you have a dead one, keep it, only $30 to get my 10watts back on, I hope, alot more lite than I can get anywhere else for $30 My luxury is a small thermos for coffee or cocoa on the a.m. bus - everyone is jealous! Liquid solutions has 1 that fits in the bottle cage, got mine @ EMS but have also seen it since at the local outdoor/bike/ski store. The most interesting thing I have found about commuting is that the same people willing to sit on a ski lift in howling winds in the cold think you are nuts to ride a bike if it is below 60 degrees.

  114. #114
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    Sounds like you have quite an excited "bobsled run" commute. Nice job rigging up the homemade studded tires! Any pics?
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  115. #115

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    This is the thread I've been looking for.

    I'm currently looking to purchase a new mountain bike for commuting and mess around on trails on the side. I live in a fairly suburban area with some access to trails not too far away, and I live about 2 miles from work. I figure, why drive when I can bike and get the exercise?

    Through advice from a friend of mine and some scouting of LBS and I want to stick with a brand that's been faithful to my friends and I through years of riding, Gary Fisher, I've come to a conclusion of a bike I'd like to purchase: an '09 GF Tass. I was going to go with a Wahoo, then a Marlin, then Piranha, and now with a sweet deal through some new-found friends at a LBS, they are going to factory direct get me an 09 GF Tass w hydro disc for like $700 and some change. I'm going to ride the guts out of the stock tires and definitely get some new ones eventually. I figure this is a decent investment in a bike, and I can afford it plus it'll save on gas in the long run.. Any tips? Advice?

  116. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by MK_04
    This is the thread I've been looking for.

    I'm currently looking to purchase a new mountain bike for commuting and mess around on trails on the side. I live in a fairly suburban area with some access to trails not too far away, and I live about 2 miles from work. I figure, why drive when I can bike and get the exercise?

    Through advice from a friend of mine and some scouting of LBS and I want to stick with a brand that's been faithful to my friends and I through years of riding, Gary Fisher, I've come to a conclusion of a bike I'd like to purchase: an '09 GF Tass. I was going to go with a Wahoo, then a Marlin, then Piranha, and now with a sweet deal through some new-found friends at a LBS, they are going to factory direct get me an 09 GF Tass w hydro disc for like $700 and some change. I'm going to ride the guts out of the stock tires and definitely get some new ones eventually. I figure this is a decent investment in a bike, and I can afford it plus it'll save on gas in the long run.. Any tips? Advice?
    Nice! If you're going to be riding in the rain, I'd definitely recommend fenders. Maybe something easily removable if you aren't going to need them on the trails. Also lights and maybe some reflective stuff. If your commute is only 2 miles, you will probably be fine with the knobbies, but you could also prossible go with a faster rolling tire like a Kenda Smallblock 8.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  117. #117
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    Pix of Studz

    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer
    .... I use a Nokian studded on the rear & a homemade studded tire on the front. I bought a box of 1000 car tire studs (the shortest ones I could find) years ago, and mount them in any mtb tire that has beefy enough lugs to drill a 3/16" hole thru. You push them thru from the inside. They have amazing traction (carbide tips?), and wear great, being designed to hold up for miles on cars, but you do have more risk of flats than with the commercial snow tires - you need a tire liner of some sort to keep the flange on the back of the studs from eventually rubbing the tube & causing a flat.
    Here's some photos of my studded tire made last wknd...showing the studs before install, shoe goo coated stud flanges (view inside tire), & some tire liners I've collected to go between tube & studs. I skimped on the outer studs this time & focused on tire centerline because the pic of my old homemade one shows the center ones shiny from the ice on my route, but the outer ones are a little rusty instead of shiny. Since you stay more upright on winter "cornering", I don't think I use the outside studs much, maybe just to help get out of a rut or something. Easier to add more later if needed. So far they work great on the commute & are quieter than my old one because they don't stick out as much (lugs less worn or just taller). If the fotos aren't below I messed up on my first try!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Commuting via mountain bike-p1010039-small-.jpg  

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    Commuting via mountain bike-p1010049-small-.jpg  

    Commuting via mountain bike-p1010062-small-.jpg  

    Commuting via mountain bike-p1010059-small-.jpg  


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