• 06-18-2011
    therollex
    Commuting Tyres question, size?
    Hi

    I am about to start a 25k commute trip each way.
    Bike will be a hardtail mtb 26
    it will be 17k on a concrete cycle path and 8km on a hardpacked 3m wide path
    The 25ks are completely flat
    I weigh around 95kg
    bike is set up with rigid forks, and 1x9 gearing
    rims Mavic 618


    The commute will probably be about 60mins each way (until i drop 10kg then it should as well)!


    I can get Schwalbe Marathon Plus at a good price, question is what size should I go for?

    26 x 1.35 -
    26 x 1.50 -
    26 x 1.75 -

    thanks
  • 06-19-2011
    mtbxplorer
    I would choose the narrower (and lighter) ones, unless the surfaces are in really bad shape or you are jumping curbs and stuff. It looks like they are all rated for at least100kg load. If you're planning to carry a lot of stuff, the widest ones are rated for 125kg.

    26 x 1.35
    SmartGuard Reflex Allround 55-95 830 g 67 100 kg 12A $58.85


    26 x 1.50
    SmartGuard Reflex Allround 50-85 860 g 67 100 kg 13, 14 $58.85

    26 x 1.75
    SmartGuard Reflex Allround 45-70 980 g 67 125 kg 13 $58.85

    26 x 1 3/8
    SmartGuard Reflex Allround 50-85 860 g 67 100 kg 12 $58.85
  • 06-19-2011
    KnifeKnut
    Take this with a teaspoon of salt since I am relatively new to bicycling, but that does not change good understanding of basic physics.
    If it were me on that setup, would go with the narrowest on the front and the widest on the rear. Light weight and lowered air friction at the front, and the best gearing for speed at the rear with so few gears at your disposal. Next time you are messing with tires, compare the outer diameters of the largest and smallest width tires, to see what I mean. The wider rear tires will also provide a more comfortable ride than narrower tires.
  • 06-19-2011
    nickboers
    Go narrow. I've found 23mm slick road tires to work pretty good on hardpack. If the soil contains a lot of clay, be careful when it gets wet. Good luck.
  • 06-20-2011
    jeffscott
    Go narrow ride hard...becareful of gravel patchs.....Slicks work fine on hardpack.....muddy could be a bit more of a problem...

    If you get alot of mud consider to wheel and tire sets.
  • 06-20-2011
    therollex
    thanks guys will give the 1.35s a go
  • 06-22-2011
    KnifeKnut
    To put it another way, with narrow tires you may run out of gears at the top end with the narrower/smaller diameter tires.
  • 06-22-2011
    jeffscott
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by KnifeKnut View Post
    Take this with a teaspoon of salt since I am relatively new to bicycling, but that does not change good understanding of basic physics.
    If it were me on that setup, would go with the narrowest on the front and the widest on the rear. Light weight and lowered air friction at the front, and the best gearing for speed at the rear with so few gears at your disposal.Normally about two gears higher Next time you are messing with tires, compare the outer diameters of the largest and smallest width tires, to see what I mean. The wider rear tires will also provide a more comfortable ride than narrower tires.

    Typically the other way around works out best....

    The bulk of the weight is carried by the rear wheel, so it dominates the rolling resistance.

    A narrow hard tire will perform much better on pavement and hardpack in this area.

    The front tire can be larger and softer to absorb the bumps better...(less impact on rolling resistance).....this is commonly done an rigid bikes.

    With a front suspension bike there is little need for a larger front tire and the air and rolling resistance can then be minimized as well....

    So go narrow ride hard, stands.
  • 06-22-2011
    KnifeKnut
    "Normally about two gears higher" was not in my original post; I resent you putting words in my mouth. I understand what you are saying, but since he has no front chainrings, he needs all of the help with gearing he can get.
  • 06-22-2011
    jeffscott
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by KnifeKnut View Post
    "Normally about two gears higher"That is why I put it in red so you could understand my comment was not in my original post; I resent you putting words in my mouthEnjoy your resentment fully. I understand what you are saying, but since he has no front chainrings, he needs all of the help with gearing he can get.

    Normally two higher refers to the two sprockets smaller on the rear cassette...so regardless of his front set up....if he normally rides at least two gears bigger than his smallest rear sprocket he will be "okay"

    If not he should consider a large front chain ring with up to 17/13= 1.30 times more teeth in the front..
  • 06-22-2011
    craigsj
    It's a flat route; he shouldn't have a problem with 1x9 gearing much less need "all of the help with gearing he can get". The difference between a 1.35 and 1.75 on a 559 rim is only about 3% anyway, or a small fraction of a single gear. It's meaningless.

    If the 1.35 size makes sense, the Kojak will be a faster tire than any Marathon. Marathons are durable but not fast.
  • 06-25-2011
    Normbilt

    Fat Tire Day 03 by normbilt, on Flickr
  • 07-03-2011
    InvictaS1
    i wouldnt go too narrow. i usually commute on my 26" hardtail and i have been using 1.95" wtb allterrainasaurus tires. my commute is about half road and half hard pack rail trail. i was using 1.5" slicks which do feel quick on road but on the hardpack they felt too slow. the bigger tires feel like they roll a lot easier.

    i have 700x32mm panaracer ribmo tires on my cross bike which work very well on road/hardpack, they make a 26" 2.0 version of the same tire, i think that would be the ideal commuting tire. the ribmos roll fast and are a lot lighter than most commuter/city tires.
  • 07-04-2011
    markaitch
    until i finally smartened up & bought a roadish bike for commuting, i spent several years riding a rockhopper to work.

    i liked the kind of tires that were smooth in the center & had knobs on the sides so i could also use that bike for light-duty trail riding without changing tires.
    my favorite "commuter tire" then was the specialed borough xc pros which were only 1.75" wide so street rolling resistance resistance was pretty low & they were really light too. but they were pretty expensive & kinda fragile.
    spec also offers a less expensive borough xc sport in the same size but it's heavier than the pro

    in the end, to save money i began using kenda kross which are similar to boroughs (slick centerline, side knobs) but wider (1.95) & a lot heavier but also a lot cheaper.
    could find them in local shops for $15-20 & amazingly, they worked pretty decent off-road too.

    have fun & good luck...

    btw...Normbilt, think you could make that pic a little bigger?
  • 07-07-2011
    BigE610
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Normbilt View Post

    Fat Tire Day 03 by normbilt, on Flickr

    were is this taken. I live in lake county and would love to know what they have that is steep?