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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by bedwards1000 View Post
    By all accounts I'd say I was riding faster today.... Except I wasn't. When I got to work I had the same average speed as the steel horse.
    Weird or not, keep the real truth in mind:
    Being fast is good. Feeling like you`re fast is even better

    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Basically, what you do is compare your mechanical energy at a standstill and at your cruising speed. If you know your power output, it's pretty easy to estimate the change in time taken if all you do is change the bike weight.

    It's even better for climbing. You can compare your potential energy at the bottom and top of the hill, and figure out how many extra seconds it takes to put out the extra energy for the heavier bike at your climbing power output.
    Huh?

  2. #102
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    Thanks Andrew. It's refreshing to have a non-weight weenie. When I decided I should get a nice light modern bike I had come to the conclusion that it was really not going to make that much difference. The relentless articles in Bicycling Magazine that made it sound like the new bikes would ride up the hills for you won me over. I'm glad I got one but it isn't night and day like some people would make you think.

    The flip side in layman's terms. It decelerates faster and has less mass going down hills, things that aren't as noticeable. The bars on the Scott are slightly wider so I'm probably catching a little more air.

    I know intellectually that the difference is small but the bike does feel much snappier. The reason people buy new bikes. If I kept impeccable records I might see 1-2% better performance from the Scott, but I don't.

  3. #103
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    Some of my MTB componants costs more than my whole commuter road bike, Bianchi Pista fixie.

    Depends on how many stairs you can ride down (and up) and get away with not receiving a misdeameanor citation.
    “Everyday is a good day,” from the Blue Cliff Records, Yun-men (864-949 AD).

  4. #104
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    I have a road and mountain bike. I rides whatever I wants to on my commute. Ocassional flats or technical issues often determines which I ride. I love them both, so I can't say I have a preference. Though for fun riding, I will alomost always choose the mountain bike.

  5. #105
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    rodar - sorry, I was dragging out a physics approach to the problem of predicting changes in performance from a lighter bike. So you need to flash back to whenever you last took physics. For me, only a couple years and I keep using that stuff every day.

    We all know it takes more work to get a heavier thing to a higher elevation. It's pretty easy to quantify as a change in potential energy. It's also more work to accelerate a heavier thing, again pretty easy to quantify as a change in kinetic energy. And something that's moving in the real world, where there's air and hysteresis, loses energy as air drag and rolling resistance perform work on that thing. That's a little harder to quantify because most of us can't get a direct measurement and it's a third-order equation, but you can look it up and take it on faith. Since both bikes are road bikes and I'm lazy, I neglected it.

    Power is just a rate at which work is performed. So if a cyclist knows his power output, he can predict how fast he can ride pieces of different courses, accelerate a bike, ride on the flats at a steady pace, etc. For road cyclists, the agreement between theoretical speeds and recorded speeds can actually be pretty good, and the agreement between theoretical changes in speed and actual changes in speed, at least where a trained athlete with a very consistent power output is concerned, is good enough to be usable. I think most of us don't train enough to be that consistent, so we have enough "fast" we're not using to go significantly faster, at least the first couple times, on a new toy. Humans can be pretty crappy engineering systems. A hill that someone truly struggles to climb might be a little better, since people probably already reach their own max. power for that duration during those climbs.

    Anyway, if one is nerdy and cynical about equipment, like someone I know , you can calculate the difference a new piece of equipment should make, as long as non-linear effects from better handling are left out. It becomes abundantly clear that unless the amount of weight coming off a bike is quite a lot, like 10 lb, it really doesn't make a difference to people who pay for their own equipment.

    "Better handling" is the excuse I used on my MTB wheels and fancy tubes. I don't expect to see a change in how long it takes me to climb a fire road, but since I do try to get stronger during the season, I wouldn't necessarily know, anyway. But when I'm on singletrack, lately, the bike definitely feels more flickable.

    I should find out what my locks weigh. It's a huge amount of weight that I add to one of my road bikes, and while I can feel the difference in handling, I don't think it effects my steady-state speeds. Since I'm in the city and have to accelerate a lot, I at least feel like I'm going faster when I'm on my racing/training road bike.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  6. #106
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    My go-to bike (recently built replacing a similarly equipped 08 alum se stout) for pretty much everything. About 23lbs and commute to work every day with it about 30mi a day over road, bike path, dirt roads and single-track. Typical commuting gear is 34/16. Turn it up on the weekends with 34/18 or 34/19, run a race and start all over again on Monday.


  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    rodar - sorry, I was dragging out a physics approach to the problem of predicting changes in performance from a lighter bike. So you need to flash back to whenever you last took physics. For me, only a couple years and I keep using that stuff every day...
    Andrw, you need to help this guy out, he failed to break his own 118mph cycling speed record - check out the video:
    Extreme cyclist looks to science in speed record bid | Video | Reuters.com

  8. #108
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    Crazy stuff. Narrower handlebars, more aero position. Of course, that could make it harder for him not to kill himself.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    rodar - sorry, I was dragging out a physics approach to the problem of predicting changes in performance from a lighter bike. So you need to flash back to whenever you last took physics.
    Physics? I hated that class. Sucked when they made us play football, baseball was worse, and basketball was the worst of all . The only times I liked it were when the coach would get pissed off and make us run for the whole period.

    just kidding Nothing to be sorry about, Andrew- I gotcha, it`s just miles over my printing press mechanic and general checkbook balancing math.

    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Andrw, you need to help this guy out, he failed to break his own 118mph cycling speed record - check out the video:
    Whooo, did they say 75% down hill? I`m shooting for a double nickle one of these days, and anything around 20% gives me hope. I don`t hink I`d care to try that one, at least not withoug a Depends chamois. Yeah, I would expect narrower bars, too. And the HPV guys who pedal up their cigar-looking shells to incredible speeds (current record a little over 82 MPH) do a lot of that high tech wind tunnel and computer modeling stuff, at least the teams who can afford it.

  10. #110
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    I have ridden a lot of different styles of bikes on the streets and I recently resurrected a 1992 Trek 400 as a commuter. it quickly replaced the hybrid I was riding to work. there's something a lot more aggressive, agile, and comfortable about drop bars and skinny tires. I feel like I am flying to work on the same effort as I put into my hybrid commute.

  11. #111
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    fight fight fight!!!

    gear ratio x rotating mass + road-crushing wheels/handling finesse - drivetrain efficiency losses= fastest commuter bike.

    trust me, the bike doesn't care what label it has, it only cares whether you've got the legs to keep the coals burning, the riding chops to cut between immovable objects, and a good lock to make sure it's still yours at the end of the day.

    (and if you don't have the first two, then it stops caring wheterh you have the latter)
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  12. #112
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    2011 hard rock sport disc

    Id like to make my bike more road worthy... to be honest i would like to have a spare wheel set to fit str8 on this by a quick change out ..i dont like to change tires..... what am i looking for? i dont want to change brake set up or gearing at this time .. can this happen? what will be the thinnest tire ill be able to come up with???

  13. #113
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    Get a set of these.
    Road - Hybrid/Comfort/City Rear=135 - Mavic CXP22 Custom for Hybrid/City Touring/Comfort Bicycles - Bicycle Wheel Warehouse

    You can use any relatively narrow 700C road slick. If you have a 26" bike, you'll start having problems with fatter tires, so things above around 35mm. But you said you wanted thinnest.

    You'll also want a cassette to match what you've got now. You may need to tweak your brake alignment and derailleur cable tension if the rear hubs don't match. I haven't had too much trouble with this in practice, but you should be aware it's a potential problem.

    Also consider spending the $350 dollars on an old road bike. Think mid-90s.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  14. #114
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    When i got new wheels for my ride and swapped over the same cassette....the rear der was way out of whack I was wanting to do the quick swap different tires but it seems like I want identical rear wheel now

  15. #115
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    I have been commuting on a mountain bike for some time now without too much trouble.
    .
    I tried it out with some smoother tires (Schwalbe marathon supremes) which was a definite improvement even over my not-so-aggressive off road tires.


    However my bike is heavy (28lbs without bags, lights and fenders) and I can't help but think how nice it would be to start with a bike that is only 15-20 lbs.

    If I strip my bike down and just carry a few things in my backpack for my 6 mile commute it makes it way easier to ride.
    I think lighter would be better so my new commuter (an old road bike) is being built with that in mind without sacrificing too much reliability.

  16. #116
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    Just put wide kenda k838 slicks on my '95 Stumpy. Commuted 25 miles in to work today. Loved it. The silence and lack of resistance was magical, yet the shock absorption was still there. No worries about curbs and potholes or the occasional small piece of "off-road" riding.

    Had a great ride. Would not sacrifice comfort/versatility for more efficiency.
    '95 M2 StumpJumper FS
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  17. #117
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    I did the commute thing with a '90s Garry Fisher MTN bike switched to a new Cannondale CX1. The 10 miles to work is not so bad any more.

  18. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by zephxiii View Post
    When i got new wheels for my ride and swapped over the same cassette....the rear der was way out of whack I was wanting to do the quick swap different tires but it seems like I want identical rear wheel now
    Depends on the type of wheel...but if it has adjustable cones on either side it can be asjusted to match the other wheel...

    Second a slightly bent RD sould also be part of the problem.

  19. #119
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    I ride a skinny tired road bike until the snow comes, usually November/December - March/April. It was a dry winter this year for us, so lots of clear road days, but my beater MTB still got kind of trashed by the road salt. It's funny, even though my 1992 Nishiki Bombardier with big studded tires is a size too small with relatively small gearing and has some other "issues", my commute time from summer to winter only varies by about 5 minutes. I guess I'm either fast on the MTB or slow on the road bike.

  20. #120
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    Mountain Bike!!! Although road bike is faster, cheaper to run?(suspension system maintenance), efficiency and so on so on......mountain bike can go wherever you want due to the much higher mobility.
    Meanwhile, since i am only commuting to somewhere, i don't want to be quite fast but super bumpy

  21. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    I don't mean to be whoring out this picture (again ) but my mountain bike and commuter/tourer are the same frame. I love the feel on the mountain bike, and compensated for the drop bars with a short, downhill stem on the tourer. Riding position is very comfortable on both bikes for me.

    I commute on my pothole bike (a road bike with wide slick tires).

    Before

    After

  22. #122
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    Hey Medi,

    I think it all depends on how rugged your terrain is and how fast you want to go. A road bike will still be a little faster and lighter than a mountain bike with slick tires. Also, if you use a steel-frame road bike, you'll get some natural shock-absorption (compared to an aluminum mtn bike frame). I've weighed out all the pros and cons here: Road Bike vs Mountain Bike for Commuting. Personally, I like using a road bike with cyclo-cross tires, some of my friends prefer a hard tail mtn bike with slicks.

  23. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by vwhammer View Post
    I have been commuting on a mountain bike for some time now without too much trouble.
    .
    I tried it out with some smoother tires (Schwalbe marathon supremes) which was a definite improvement even over my not-so-aggressive off road tires.


    However my bike is heavy (28lbs without bags, lights and fenders) and I can't help but think how nice it would be to start with a bike that is only 15-20 lbs.

    If I strip my bike down and just carry a few things in my backpack for my 6 mile commute it makes it way easier to ride.
    I think lighter would be better so my new commuter (an old road bike) is being built with that in mind without sacrificing too much reliability.
    What fender set is that? I like how the front floats...

  24. #124
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    If you are young and care about speed....road bike.

    If you are older and just want to ride a bit more upright and can go anywhere on the same bike....mountain bike.

  25. #125
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    Commuting: Mountain Bike or Road Bike

    I run 2km of gravel in my 12 km commute, i also do a trail single track ride at lunch or did till it got overgrown and flooded mid summer.

    I run a 29er sport or trail style bike. The 2.2" continentals are cushy yet are rated for hard pack and pave and grip in the dirt. I can lock out fork for climbs, and its still fast.

    I was thinking of getting halo twin rail 700c tires for it to get more speed now that im not trail riding.
    Fatbike, XC bike, Gravel Bike....

  26. #126
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    I ride my hard tail mountain bike to and from work, I plan on getting slick tires and lighter rims for it.

  27. #127
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    Re: Commuting: Mountain Bike or Road Bike

    I've always wanted a roadie but unfortunately there's this really steep hill right after a sharp corner going to my house. I'd have to walk the bike up.

    The other side is muddy with big rocks. It's short but again, I'd have to walk the bike.

    Only option is making my MTB more street-worthy.


  28. #128
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    There is always the other hybrid form. Kona Rove, Surly Crosscheck, and Jamis Bosanova have broad gearing up to 3x10 and drop bars. Every maker seems to have a cyclocross option, a few still make touring bikes. Surly and Kona will even take fairly wide tires.

    We are now so spoiled for choice as to make choosing difficult at any reasonable price point. Lorsban, the three bikes above (and countless others) would probably handle your ride with a more roadie feel and look. If you love the bike you have, changing out tires is the best first step. Slicks on an mtb, however, might not be any better in mud than CX tires on a cyclocross type bike, though they will be softer on rough pavement.

    Kona, Jamis, Raleigh, and even Cannondale have several options for road/mtb hybrids. If brand loyalty is not the first consideration, we can now choose almost any combination and find it on a showroom floor. The combinations are nearly endless, which means we have an excuse for many more test rides before buying a bike.

    The bike that makes you smile most of the time is the best bike for you. Figuring out which bike that is gets harder every few weeks. N+1 reigns supreme.

  29. #129
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    Re: Commuting: Mountain Bike or Road Bike

    Quote Originally Posted by Rustedthrough View Post
    There is always the other hybrid form. Kona Rove, Surly Crosscheck, and Jamis Bosanova have broad gearing up to 3x10 and drop bars. Every maker seems to have a cyclocross option, a few still make touring bikes. Surly and Kona will even take fairly wide tires.

    We are now so spoiled for choice as to make choosing difficult at any reasonable price point. Lorsban, the three bikes above (and countless others) would probably handle your ride with a more roadie feel and look. If you love the bike you have, changing out tires is the best first step. Slicks on an mtb, however, might not be any better in mud than CX tires on a cyclocross type bike, though they will be softer on rough pavement.

    Kona, Jamis, Raleigh, and even Cannondale have several options for road/mtb hybrids. If brand loyalty is not the first consideration, we can now choose almost any combination and find it on a showroom floor. The combinations are nearly endless, which means we have an excuse for many more test rides before buying a bike.

    The bike that makes you smile most of the time is the best bike for you. Figuring out which bike that is gets harder every few weeks. N+1 reigns supreme.
    Hi Rustedthrough,

    I didn't know there were cyclocross bikes with 3x10. How wide are the tires? How much would it weigh with thicker tires?

    Anyway, I just put 1.5in Panaracer Tour tires and narrowed the bars a bit. I don't know if it's just the tires but it feels about 20% more effortless than before (used to have 1.95 maxxis crossmax). Climbing is way easier now and I have no problems on the rocky sections (dry).

    I also like that I can still move to the shoulder and keep going even if it's gravelly or rocky.

    Little by little I'm going to make this bike lighter. With shocks it was 24-25lbs, now it should be around 20lbs maybe less.

    Or maybe make it single speed? I used to have a ss bike and thought it was a lot of fun. Like bmx before.
    Last edited by lorsban; 09-06-2014 at 02:12 AM.

  30. #130
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    On my road bike I generally avg 30mph+ on the pan flat highway to work; even if I run slicks it's much harder work to get to and maintain 25mph on my hard tail. I really notice how much more efficient a road bike is on the flat, rather than where it is hilly.

  31. #131
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    Lorsban, the Rove and the Bosanova aren't quite cyclocross but some other road/ mtb hybrid. The Rove will take 700x40 tires. My Bosanova with puncture resistant 700x28 tires is about 28 pounds. Not light and not lightning, but a fairly versatile alternative and a pleasant ride.

  32. #132
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    Commuting: Mountain Bike or Road Bike

    I'd vote for a cyclocross bike with some less aggressive tread tires. I'm looking at adding Small Block 8's on mine for a road/gravel rider. But also have more aggressive knobbies to put on for more dirt riding. Love the cyclocross bike for all around usage. Fits great in the middle of my road and mtb and honestly gets the most riding time.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by pitbullandmtb; 09-06-2014 at 06:18 PM.

  33. #133
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    I was in tge same predicament and went with a cyclocross a little bit of both worlds.

  34. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by SimpleJon View Post
    On my road bike I generally avg 30mph+ on the pan flat highway to work; even if I run slicks it's much harder work to get to and maintain 25mph on my hard tail.
    I really notice how full of crap you are! How many Tour de Frances have you won, how many Giro D'Italias, etc.? On the flats pro cyclists average 25-28 mph. Source:
    Tour de France Riders vs. Regular Cyclists | Bicycling Magazine
    The best Tour De France average speed is by Lance Armstrong at 25.8 mph(41.56400 kilometers per hour). Source:
    Tour de France average speed | UCI Travel

    I have read alot of ridiculous crap on this forum, but you have really outdone the pack. Perhaps you are just simpletonJon and just entered a grossly incorrect tire size to your old non-GPS cycling computer...

  35. #135
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    Re: Commuting: Mountain Bike or Road Bike

    Quote Originally Posted by RoyFokker View Post
    I really notice how full of crap you are! How many Tour de Frances have you won, how many Giro D'Italias, etc.? On the flats pro cyclists average 25-28 mph. Source:
    Tour de France Riders vs. Regular Cyclists | Bicycling Magazine
    The best Tour De France average speed is by Lance Armstrong at 25.8 mph(41.56400 kilometers per hour). Source:
    Tour de France average speed | UCI Travel

    I have read alot of ridiculous crap on this forum, but you have really outdone the pack. Perhaps you are just simpletonJon and just entered a grossly incorrect tire size to your old non-GPS cycling computer...
    that had me dying.

  36. #136
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    The funniest part is to come when some of the ignorant userbase will give me negative reputation points for such brutal honesty in calling out a liar or total ignorant.

  37. #137
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    Re: Commuting: Mountain Bike or Road Bike

    Quote Originally Posted by RoyFokker View Post
    The funniest part is to come when some of the ignorant userbase will give me negative reputation points for such brutal honesty in calling out a liar or total ignorant.
    Hey I got your back, but what you said was true, dude was out of his mind to make a comment like that.

  38. #138
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    Re: Commuting: Mountain Bike or Road Bike

    Quote Originally Posted by Rustedthrough View Post
    Lorsban, the Rove and the Bosanova aren't quite cyclocross but some other road/ mtb hybrid. The Rove will take 700x40 tires. My Bosanova with puncture resistant 700x28 tires is about 28 pounds. Not light and not lightning, but a fairly versatile alternative and a pleasant ride.
    Those have a 3x10 drive train? What groupset? Is it with that combo brake/shifter?

    I always wondered how those worked.

  39. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by RoyFokker View Post
    I really notice how full of crap you are! How many Tour de Frances have you won, how many Giro D'Italias, etc.? On the flats pro cyclists average 25-28 mph. Source:
    Tour de France Riders vs. Regular Cyclists | Bicycling Magazine
    The best Tour De France average speed is by Lance Armstrong at 25.8 mph(41.56400 kilometers per hour). Source:
    Tour de France average speed | UCI Travel

    I have read alot of ridiculous crap on this forum, but you have really outdone the pack. Perhaps you are just simpletonJon and just entered a grossly incorrect tire size to your old non-GPS cycling computer...
    Or perhaps it was just a typo and I meant 30Kmph +, but you would never believe that would you.
    I certainly can't average 30mph+ that would be ridiculous.
    much better for you to start dishing out neg rep and calling people out as a BSer as you did rather than point out that they may have made a mistake.

  40. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by SimpleJon View Post
    Or perhaps it was just a typo and I meant 30Kmph +, but you would never believe that would you.
    I certainly can't average 30mph+ that would be ridiculous.
    much better for you to start dishing out neg rep and calling people out as a BSer as you did rather than point out that they may have made a mistake.
    I make that mistake often. For all of my schooling I use metric, and so I generally just use that unless I'm talking to someone, then I'm back in the SI system.

    I sold a guy some headphones at my job and he wanted to know the for length. The box said 1.6m and he looked really confused. I told him it's about five feet.

  41. #141
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    ^"for length " = cord length.

  42. #142
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    Yep, some of the biggest and most expensive engineering screw ups that I've seen in my job have come about because of unit conversion foul ups especially when we deal with the US.
    The UK is pretty much metric except for mph and antiquated crap like weight in Stones. I've lived in Asia for 15 years, now I am pretty much 100% metric but when I talk to Americans I still have to go back to US measurements, half of which are different to the UK Imperial measurements even though they have the same units.

  43. #143
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    Lorsban, the Bosanova has 3x10 with integrated shifters. I think it is Tiagra with an FSA crank. The Rove is a little more expensive, might be better grade component set. I don't recall whether the Rove is bar end or integrated shifting. I am still new to cycling with a destination, and not an authority on the technical stuff.

    I spend most of my time puttering in the lower chainrings with too much crap in my panniers. I did hit 20 mph on the flat today for about half a mile, my avg speed is closer to 13 mph.

    Lots of grass and gravel today dodging storm damage and road repairs, this odd cyclocross/ touring hybrid seems to be the perfect mix for me.

  44. #144
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    Re: Commuting: Mountain Bike or Road Bike

    Quote Originally Posted by Rustedthrough View Post
    Lorsban, the Bosanova has 3x10 with integrated shifters. I think it is Tiagra with an FSA crank. The Rove is a little more expensive, might be better grade component set. I don't recall whether the Rove is bar end or integrated shifting. I am still new to cycling with a destination, and not an authority on the technical stuff.

    I spend most of my time puttering in the lower chainrings with too much crap in my panniers. I did hit 20 mph on the flat today for about half a mile, my avg speed is closer to 13 mph.

    Lots of grass and gravel today dodging storm damage and road repairs, this odd cyclocross/ touring hybrid seems to be the perfect mix for me.
    That sounds really interesting!

    Thanks for all the info!

  45. #145
    Bicyclochondriac.
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    An mtb setup is a lot of fun to tool around on from time to time, but on a regular basis I refer a more road-oriented ride. I've got a rigid mid 90's mtb frame built up with narrow tires, fenders, racks, etc. But I am now looking for more of a touring bike frame to set up in a similar fashion.

    Commuting: Mountain Bike or Road Bike-017b3abf0662dfaafda7d8941179869e39c45210a9.jpg
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  46. #146
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    That's awesome - I have an almost identical setup and have a quick question. How are the Top Contact winter II's; I'm thinking about swapping to them for most of this winters commute?

    (If the weather gets any worse than that I have a ratbike with studded tires - I'm looking for the Contact's to get me through the odd bit of ice and generally slimey conditions).

    Thanks a bunch.

    Quote Originally Posted by cyclocommuter View Post
    Best of both worlds in my opinion is a cyclocross bike. It can accept tires up to 700x37c which means you can put anything from slicks, to knobbies to studded. I have different wheels for different seasons on my cyclocross.

    Here is a pic with non-studded Conti Top Contact Winter IIs:


    With studded Schwalbe Marathons:

  47. #147
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    Idea! I like road bikes but I need an ATB.

    I guess if you need to cover a lot of miles and and have reasonably smooth pavement for your path, then a road bike would be ideal.

    However, my commuting so far is mostly less than 10 miles each way, with varying road (path) conditions to deal with. So, I try to equip my bikes in a way that will give good zoom on pavement, but can handle the occasional rough patches.

    For me, this has meant riding the thickest road/slick slick tires
    that I can find, for 26" MTB/ATB bikes. For me, these types of tires handle everything except deep mud (which I avoid since I'm commuting and not off-roading):


    Kenda Kommuter K1045 26x2 (85 psi !!! )
    Kenda Kwick Roller Sport K1029 26 x 2 ( 80 psi !!! )

    Nomad Resist 26 x 2.25 ( 80 psi !!! )
    Freedom Thickslick 26 x 2 ( 80 psi !!! )

    Btw did I mention that the aforebabbled tires can run 80-85 psi?
    Most 26 x 2's seem to mostly be rated for only @ 65 psi max.

    Other good 26 road/commuting tires:
    Schwalbe Kojak 26 x 2 (70 psi)
    Hutchinson Gotham 26 x 1.7, 44-559 ( 86 psi )

    Btw, tires are not ranked for puncture protection. I will find or start another thread on that. For myself, using an internal puncture sealant, coupled with tire liners, allows me to use pretty much any tire
    I'd want to use.

    For commuting, I mainly ride:
    a '95 vintage red Schwinn Moab 3 MTB/ATB,
    a Dahon D7 26" folder, or

    for snow conditions, a Mongoose Dolomite
    (with 14-34 rear-cog, 175mm cranks,
    and either
    45NRTH HÜSKER DÜ tires, or VEE Mission Commander tires).

    Most all frames are covered in high-grade reflective tape
    (3m Diamond. Avery also makes a similar product).

    I think the most important thing you can do for cycle-commuting
    is to make sure you and your bike are as hi-vis reflective as possible.

  48. #148
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    steveh250,

    Just adding a vote for the Contact Winter IIs.
    I rode them last winter with no problems, great non-studded option for winter.
    This winter I'm also going to try CST's Sensamo Control tire. It has a similar tread/concept to the Conti's Contact Winter tire, but about a third of the price.
    I'm sure it's a less sophisticated tire quality/material wise, but I'm curious to see
    how it will perform in winter/snow.

  49. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2wTrekr View Post
    steveh250,

    Just adding a vote for the Contact Winter IIs.
    I rode them last winter with no problems, great non-studded option for winter.
    This winter I'm also going to try CST's Sensamo Control tire. It has a similar tread/concept to the Conti's Contact Winter tire, but about a third of the price.
    I'm sure it's a less sophisticated tire quality/material wise, but I'm curious to see
    how it will perform in winter/snow.
    Thanks for the feedback - that's great to hear. I went ahead and bought the Contact II's but the weather has been pretty good lately so I'll give it some time for the weather to worsen before fitting them. I'll be interested to hear about the CST's.

    Just took a look around the net at the CST's, if I'd known about these I would definitely have given them a try at that price - nice find!!

  50. #150
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    My commute is roughly 5.5 - 6 miles each way and consists of paved roads and a bit of gravel. I have a Surly Cross Check and started riding that, but quickly decided I didn't like the idea of leaving it outside, in the rain, at risk of being tampered with or stolen. So I decided to take the 90's Mtn bike approach and built a commuter. Something I'd enjoy riding, but wouldn't mind leaving outside. It's the best move I've made yet!

    Mid 90's Specialized HardRock steel frame
    Schwalbe Fat Frank 26x2.35" tires
    WTB wheel set
    Deore crankset with Surly 36T ring
    Fyxation Mesa pedals
    DMR SS spacer kit with 16T cog
    RaceFace flat bars
    Avid v-brakes
    Surly Singleator tentioner (for the odd Specialized dropouts)
    Evo seatpost
    Bontrager Nebula Eco saddle
    Origin8 stem and quill stem adapter

    Commuting: Mountain Bike or Road Bike-img_0684.jpg

    Commuting: Mountain Bike or Road Bike-img_0685.jpg

  51. #151
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    Surly 1x1 with a rigid fork.
    Alfine-8 IGH (though honestly I get by on 3 gears 95% of the time even with SF hills)
    Avid BB7 disk brakes
    Fenders & a rack.

    This combo is the most fun I've had commuting in the city. Its every bit as practical as my previous flat bar touring hybrid setup (less efficient for distance rides) but more durable and handles better in traffic.

  52. #152
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    My criteria was relatively cheap (under $2k), Ti or steel for comfort, disc brakes for the wet, reliability and durability over weight and nice to have rack/fender mounts.

    I ended up going with a Ti CX bike from bikesdirect. Ticked all the boxes above. I went with a seatpost mounted rack but it's kinda wobbly out of the saddle and I'll probably switch to panniers and fenders now that winter is coming.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Commuting: Mountain Bike or Road Bike-commuter.jpg  


  53. #153
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    For my commuting purpose usually i prefer a road bike.

  54. #154
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    Tastes great. Less filling.
    Baby, I want my face to be your quiver killer.

  55. #155
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    My commute is a fairly flat (strava says 300m total vert) 33km round trip, 99% on roads.

    Usually done on my single speed Cannondale Capo, as winter arrived i decided to build a dedicated wet weather bike/bunky.

    Ended up building a late 90s Sunn rigid MTB, running a 38/14 on 2.4 Holy Rollers. Train heavy, race light! Fat tires is so much fun/plush, i dont worry as much when rolling over debris, especially in the wet. Definitely need mudgaurds though as pleeenty of spray.

    Im probably 3/4 km/h avg and 7/10mins slower overall, but who cares, its a commute.

    The biggest take out is the comfort! just a more enjoyable ride because of the position, and being in the wet its great to have the extra visibility and also easy to jump obstacles and kerbs when needed, also mtb cleats are wayyy easier to clipin/out. I enjoy it so much i still ride when its not wet!

    went from this


    to this

  56. #156
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    I have been my hybrid bike to work everyday. It is always fun. I got my hybrid bike from Aurumania.

  57. #157
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    Get a steel road bike.

    $499 bikesdirect.com with Claris groupset.

  58. #158
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    I just replaced my Ti CX with a carbon hardtail MTB. Although I've also been commuting on my SS beach cruiser and rigid SS MTB. The road bike was faster but I just am not into the roadie position and skinnier tires.

  59. #159
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    I started doing my first commutes mostly on a mountain bike (sometimes on a fat bike) going through the woods, back dirt roads, bike paths, short distances on the road during the day a few times a week. Then I went to a road bike riding all paved roads during the day a few times a week.

    Then I got an ebike (used motor very little) riding day and night on all paved roads about 5-6 times a week. Distance for all these rides was 12.5 miles one way. Then I bought a Velomobile and to date ride day and night 5-6 times a week. For the Velo I travel 18 miles one way on all paved roads. In the Velo it only takes about 5 minutes longer than the 12.5 mile route as there are less hills and the Velo is very fast!

  60. #160
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    fixing my typing

    I started commuting on a steel Mongoose (1995) that was converted to strictly pavement use after a year; slicks, 12-25 cassette, both flat bar and drop bar at various times, and paniers. After the top tube broke (JRA, honest!) the Cannondale F9 frame I received as a warranty replacement from Pacific Cycles/Dorel was built up much the same: Specialized Fatboy 1.25" slicks at 110 psi, 44T LX drivetrain, Elixir 3 brakes, rigid Nashbar fork (same crown to axle measurement as 4" suspension fork). The narrow high-pressure slicks help it roll fast and quiet; I haven't commuted on knobbies, but the odd ride to a trailhead on my hardtail Zaskar or FS Rocky Element Race have taken longer than I would have expected to do on the commuter, so I would expect expect the knobbies (2.25" Michelin Wild Grip'r) to be 5-8 kmh slower than the slicks, as far as the speeds I can maintain.

    As far as road frame vs. MTB, I'd go MTB for commuting in traffic: more durable, upright position, sturdier wheels and tires (26 x 1.75 Specialized Borough now) more forgiving on our local pavement.
    Last edited by Northern dave2; 12-01-2018 at 02:22 PM. Reason: typos

  61. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    I prefer my mountain bike from November to April for a couple of reasons:

    -Disc brakes (from both a performance and rim-wear standpoint)
    -Accommodation of large studded tires for snowfall events
    -Slightly more upright position in traffic works better with winter clothing
    -Flat bar works better with my mirror and pogies.
    Not much to add to my 2012 answer, other than my new "road bike" is a gravel bike of sorts, so the tires are a bit wider and it has disc brakes, and with drop-bar mitts I can use it a few more weeks into the late fall before I switch to the mountain bike.

    Because even with new-school road tires, there are a lot more cracks in the road that a 30c tire will drop into vs a 2.3" mountain bike tire, at night, in the rain, with car headlights shining in my face, etc.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  62. #162
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    I like hybrids

  63. #163
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    I only own 1 bike a 2013 rockhopper
    It does everything including commuting. My ride to work is on roads but all down very steep hills with a stair case in the middle. I ride on gravel tracks home it doubles the ride back but is a lot less steep. I love the 29er it may not be the most efficient way to commute but it is the most fun.

  64. #164
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    Untitled by Sarah Connie

    Mtb for trail and one for road/city. Nice thing is the handling is so similar I can cross train very easily. The gearing on the trail one is a bit lower on the top end but a lot lower on the low end so it is nice on the super windy days or going for an after work trail ride.
    '93 Giant Sedona ATX custom
    '93 Giant Sedona AtX aero-edition
    '73 Schwinn Suburban
    '95 Fuji Suncrest

  65. #165
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    Not for commuting per se, but more of a canal cruiser.

    So, I have a friend who is in the midst of preparing for a kidney transplant after being off the mountain bike for a few years due to 3-4x per week dialysis. I told him once he got stable and cleared to get back to some exercise, I'd make sure to have something appropriate to go out and do some canal/path miles with him.

    Well, that time has come and after spending a bunch of time looking at hybrids or less expensive road bikes, I decided to re-purpose my '97 Rockhopper frame/fork that had been sitting in the attic with a bunch of my parts bin items. I do have it set up as a SS at the moment, but also have the parts to make it a 1x9 which I will most likely do this week, as well as putting the front brake back on. Tires for now are some Forte 2.2 somethings that have a pretty small knob and roll ok at 50psi, but I will most likely go a little skinnier with tires that are more purpose built.

    Enjoy!

    Commuting: Mountain Bike or Road Bike-img_3842.jpg
    MTBR: Your dad's online mountain bike forum.



  66. #166
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    What kind of roads/paths do you take for the commute? If its all stuff that can be ridden with a road bike, but you want a more comfortable ride, Id suggest maybe a road/cross/gravel-ish frame that can take wider tires that you can run a little lower on pressure (~40ish would be plenty). It also might be quicker than a mtb if you have a longer commute

  67. #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by blaklabl View Post
    So, I have a friend who is in the midst of preparing for a kidney transplant after being off the mountain bike for a few years due to 3-4x per week dialysis. I told him once he got stable and cleared to get back to some exercise, I'd make sure to have something appropriate to go out and do some canal/path miles with him.

    Well, that time has come and after spending a bunch of time looking at hybrids or less expensive road bikes, I decided to re-purpose my '97 Rockhopper frame/fork that had been sitting in the attic with a bunch of my parts bin items. I do have it set up as a SS at the moment, but also have the parts to make it a 1x9 which I will most likely do this week, as well as putting the front brake back on. Tires for now are some Forte 2.2 somethings that have a pretty small knob and roll ok at 50psi, but I will most likely go a little skinnier with tires that are more purpose built.

    Enjoy!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Nice, clean, simple. And cheap. Sounds like me.....

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