• 07-02-2018
    RacerLex
    Commute with tubeless? What type of pump do you carry?
    Any mini-pump recommendations for tubeless tires? My tires are Maxxis Re-Fuse 700x40. Currently I'm carrying a pump from two decades ago and a tube. I'll always carry a tube but it would be nice to find a pump that puts out enough air to seat a tubeless tire for road side repairs.

    Wishful thinking?
  • 07-02-2018
    J.B. Weld
    My tubeless experience is limited to mtb tires but with those I've yet to have one come unseated. If the puncture won't seal I've always had to break the bead to install a tube.

    So personally I think any pump is fine. Co2 is good too (maybe better) and would seat a tire if you ever found it necessary.
  • 07-02-2018
    RacerLex
    I've read that using CO2 isn't recommend with sealant, though I've never tried it.
  • 07-02-2018
    NYrr496
    I have a Dahon with 20" wheels as a commuter bike since I take it on the railroad and a folder is the only bike allowed during peak rush hour.
    It originally came with Schwalbe Marathon Supremes that never got flats. Once, the rear tire was worn to the nub so I put a regular 20" tire on it which I got a flat on the first day. I decided to make it tubeless. I taped the rims, added sealant and effortlessly seated the tire. When I got the pressure up to about 55 psi, the sealant failed and shot sealant all over the place. I realized this was not going to work and there was no way I wanted to be the a hole spraying sealant all over the inside of the train so I went back to Schwalbe tires with the protective layer and have been fine since.
    I use a Lezyne Pressure Drive pump. It's excellent.
  • 07-02-2018
    twodownzero
    I use a Lezyne micro floor drive for all my mountain biking needs.
  • 07-02-2018
    cyclingdutchman
    I have 2 lezyne high volume drive pumps that can get most tires upto 3,5 bar. Thats enough for me to get home or to the next gas station (I got car vents on all my bikes).
    For road bike you better take the lezyne high pressure drive.

    The lezyne pumps are quite costly but also the best I have ever had. Overhere in europe the minipumps are like 50-60, the micro floor is even 70, but worth it. And I got mine both used for 25, so that might be an option too.
  • 07-03-2018
    ghettocruiser
    While CO2 isn't recommended for sealant, you just need it to seat the bead and get home.... you can drain it out and reinflate with a floor pump, which is what I used to do with thinwall tubes anyways since it leaked faster than regular air.

    But my roadside repairs always consist of putting in a tube as well. Which can be a problem, if the tubeless tire has a year's worth of sharp things stuck in it, that have been previously fixed by the sealant. I put three immediate holes in a brand new tube this way once. Double check.
  • 07-03-2018
    J.B. Weld
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    While CO2 isn't recommended for sealant, you just need it to seat the bead and get home.... you can drain it out and reinflate with a floor pump, which is what I used to do with thinwall tubes anyways since it leaked faster than regular air.

    But my roadside repairs always consist of putting in a tube as well. Which can be a problem, if the tubeless tire has a year's worth of sharp things stuck in it, that have been previously fixed by the sealant. I put three immediate holes in a brand new tube this way once. Double check.


    x2

    I used to prefer mini-pumps over co2, mainly due to the expense, environmental cost and hassle of replacing cartridges every time I flatted. Since converting to tubeless flats are now rare enough that I can justify springing for a $3 cartridge every other year or so.


    As far as seating the bead is concerned I'm guessing that's something you may never have to do on the road or trail.
  • 07-05-2018
    root
    I don't think there is a minipump that can seat a bead. CO2 is best chance. You could carry around a pressure chamber, but CO2 would be faster. If the bead breaks, youll either need to find a gas station or put a tube in. For punctures, weve used the tubeless repair strip things and they work.
    The other posters experience with tubeless spraying sealant, not really a failure of the sealant. Getting non tubeless rated tires and rims to work tubeless will meet with mixed results. Friend had a tubeless rated rim that he tried using cheap GEAX tires with, he repeatedly blew the tire off the rim spooging everywhere. Yes he had fun explaining what that milky white gooey stuff all over his shorts was.