cold climate urban commuters: are you going to do studded tires?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    cold climate urban commuters: are you going to do studded tires?

    This will be my first winter commuting. I'm in Pittsburgh, PA. When it's really bad and snowy I can take the bus but I don't want to rely on it. So, I was thinking the nokian A10's might be a good tire in cinders and give me a little protection in black ice and super light snow. They can be had in a 700c x 32 which is the most narrow i've found. my fixie has 28's on it now.

    Is this overkill? Actually I like overkill. Been putting 4 dedicated snow tires on AWD cars as long as I've been driving.

    cheers to peterwhite for the pic!

  2. #2
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    Get em' and ride slower - with confidence.

    I use Schwalbe Marathon winter tires. There have been a couple of occasions where I assumed the ambient temperature would mean no ice, so I'd take the standard tire bike only to find out otherwise. No harm, just a seriously elevated heart rate.

    Like yourself, I use an AWD car with snow tires. They're 'orrible on dry roads - but when it snows.. Well, you know how it is. That's not overkill - that's preventing unecessary stress and potentially preventing collisions. Of course, with all the traction of 4 snow tires you may tend to drive a bit faster than necessary. Always a counterpoint to these things.

    Also - I am in RI - similar temps and precipitation. If anything PA may be more conducive to developing ice as the temp hovers nearer to raining then freezing. Prime conditions for good carbide studded tires.

  3. #3
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    I'm in the frozen north of Edmonton, Canada. I commuted through the winter for the first time last year, and used the Nokian 26x1.9 Mount and Ground. I thought they were great, and they're barely showing any wear after 6 months of daily use (sections of trail were still icy into April).

    They're pretty narrow for a 1.9, so when the snow is deep they can get bogged down. But on ice and hardpacked snow they were amazing. Basically, the cookie-dough snow that cars churn up right after a snowfall is a challenge, but there's probably no way around that. For the rest of the time I was jumping off icy ruts and generally having a blast. I would say it's definitely worth it because winter cycling can be great fun.

  4. #4
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    I haven't tried those particular tires, but one thing I noticed last winter is that the center studs get more use than the ones on the edge. I used a homemade one on the front and a nokian extreme on the rear. The center studs are nice and shiny, because they are always getting polished on the ice, but the edge ones get a little rust. This leads me to believe that I don't want studded tires without some studs closer to the center line. I want grip for going straight ahead too! Yes, they will be louder and more work on dry pavement, but the tradeoff for traction is OK with me. Even on the corners, for safety, you tend to stay more upright on ice rather than lean into them, so the outer studs may not get a chance to grip even then. I do agree with Peter W that the outer ones can help you get out of an icy rut, etc. Of course other factors like the profile of the tire, & tire pressure, make a difference too, so I may be over-generalizing.

    I am in VT, urban would be a stretch.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer
    This leads me to believe that I don't want studded tires without some studs closer to the center line.
    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer
    I am in VT, urban would be a stretch.
    I agree on both counts The Marathons I run have 240 studs - plenty in the center so there is no waiting for the right angle to gain traction.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled
    I'm in the frozen north of Edmonton, Canada. I commuted through the winter for the first time last year, and used the Nokian 26x1.9 Mount and Ground. I thought they were great, and they're barely showing any wear after 6 months of daily use (sections of trail were still icy into April).

    They're pretty narrow for a 1.9, so when the snow is deep they can get bogged down. But on ice and hardpacked snow they were amazing. Basically, the cookie-dough snow that cars churn up right after a snowfall is a challenge, but there's probably no way around that. For the rest of the time I was jumping off icy ruts and generally having a blast. I would say it's definitely worth it because winter cycling can be great fun.
    Nice to see another crazy person who rides here...

    Am running self studded tyres (Fire XC's) and they make a huge difference in traction on ice and the 2.1 floats over the snow really well, rocks on hardpack, and ride beautifully as the roads can also be really rough.



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  7. #7
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    Edmonton, Alaska, the Yukon, yeah, now THAT's a REAL winter commuting situation. Have a brother there, lived in Ottawa two years so have an inkling. We got some snow pack covered with snot here last winter because they can't justify the equiment to remove it and we stayed below freezing with out a melt to fix it for weeks (rare event here). Side streets in Edmonton, I understand are solid snow pack a goodly piece of the winter. It would be studs, or face plant. Helmet doff to you in salute!

    Peter White gives mounted sizes for most of his snows. The Nokian A10 in 700-32 is about 30 on a Dyad width rim, the 40 is closer to a 36, and the 650-38 is a 35mm tire on 22 mm Synergy. I am asking Santa for a pair of 700-40 A10s. I rode only twice during our cold snap because I doubled my lifetime total for near-spills in the first and tripled the old count after the second. Trainers are not my favorite. I figure if I get them, I won't need them until they rot from ozone. Which is OK by me.

  8. #8
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    I'm in Toronto, probably pretty similar weather wise to Pittsburgh. I run studs all winter, even if the roads are dry. It's amazing how often water, either melt off or someone washing a car or the like, will run into the side of the road where I am and freeze up solid. I've used Nokians, a cheap brand that I can't for the life of me recall the name of, and right now I'm on the second season on a pair of Schwalbes. The Nokians and the Shwalbes were/are both nice. The Nokians were lasting about three seasons and I expect the same from the Schwalbes.
    Cheers, Dave

  9. #9
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    My set of Schwalbe Snow Stud 26" x 1.9" arrived yesterday. I'll install them tonight. Last winter, I was able to go until mid January in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada on regular 26" knobby tires. At that point, things iced over and it got a bit scary. I think the Snow Studs will be enough to get me through that period of this winter.

  10. #10
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    The A10's are ok for "it's cold enough for there to be ice, but I don't see much of it, or I'm careful when I see it", but if I could fit them, I'd go with the Schwalbe Marathon winters (which I have on my bike). They're more expensive, but can handle any sort of ice at all, including biking on an ice skating rink. From what I've read from other people, rolling resistance should be similar between the Marathon Winters and the A10's. I lose about 1mph versus non-studded tires on the same bike (and that's 28c non-studded tires) in dry conditions with either tire. They're not great once you get more than a few inches of snow, but the A10's are probably even worse.

    The A10's are not a terrible choice or anything, there's no doubt they're better than a non-studded tire or the cheap Innova tires that everyone says are total crap (the studs wear down fairly quick, and suddenly and without warning you don't have studs any more). Nokian tires are quality.

    It's just my personal preference - I would lean towards the Marathon Winters. Though to be fair, I have not used the A10's just read about them. (I know they don't work the best when there's a lot of ice.)

  11. #11
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    Marathon

    The marathons are great on packed to ice roads. Like above poster these are horrible in any deep snow. Too thin. 2 full winter commute seasons and they still got life in them. Make sure you wear them in before you use on the bad stuff. I have lost 2 studs but the tread is great. Bad stuff you drop the pressure down and raise it when it's nice. Fun to zip by bikes without studs.

  12. #12
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    I'm using Nokian W240s. They're awesome.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schmucker
    I'm using Nokian W240s. They're awesome.
    ...and slow.

  14. #14
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    The snow removal and driver experience here means any appreciable snow is suicide in anything less than a Hummer or jacked up 4WD. That is fairly rare. Patches of snow skiff over ice, frozen snow pack with slime, are the culprits that gave me issues last winter, but the winter before I rode every day but when snow was falling/blowing making people nuts.

    Sounds like the cheaper Nokian A10 would do for me on one bike. If conditions are too bad for them, I don't likely want to be dealing with the nut cases in cages, unless I am caged, too. Also rim brakes even cool stops are a bit too exciting with melting/refreezing snow.

  15. #15
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    I've only used my new Nokians WXC's two times, but already got to check on a motorist who slid off the road. It's also fun to have peds hear the studs coming. I am a little sad to give up on my homemade front studded tire, it had ultimate grip,but heavier and more prone to flats since the stud flange wore on the tube eventually, even with tire liners. I have daily "ice pavement" on my dirt road, and whatever the weather brings on top of that.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by datalore
    My set of Schwalbe Snow Stud 26" x 1.9" arrived yesterday. I'll install them tonight. Last winter, I was able to go until mid January in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada on regular 26" knobby tires. At that point, things iced over and it got a bit scary. I think the Snow Studs will be enough to get me through that period of this winter.
    Did a couple of rides on the Schwalbes this week. At max pressure, they run as well as the knobbies that they replaced. At low pressure, they are slow but super grippy. For me, they ought to do the trick when things ice over in January.

  17. #17
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    I`m new to the stud game, but liking it so far for the most part. Last year I made chains that worked well, but wore out way too fast. This year I was on the fence about studs and thought I`d probably try again with (sturdier) chains when I happened into a deal I couldn`t pass up for Winter Marathons. I wish the A10s came in 26- they would probably be better for my route than the Marathons.
    Recalculating....

  18. #18
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    I went all last winter with self studded tires just north of Kansas City MO. I have some 700C Marathon Winter and A10 coming for my new Trek 520. Schwalbe for the front and A10 rear. We'll see if the rear is enough. I went without rear studs last year until I was waiting at a light and the bike just spun when the light changed. It was fun to learn how to get around even after an ice storm. The cages were having a hard time as I sauntered on past them. Try studs if you want to go. I like being able to get on the bike and get to work before the neighbor has the ice off his windshield. Safe ridin' to you. Mud Flap

  19. #19
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    Are these price-overkill: Continental Spike Claw 240 Studded Tire

    They're made in Finland and run $89 a tire .

    Versus: Innova Ice Husky Studded Snow Tire at $44.99 a tire. Made in China.


    I'm concerned about QA: Finland vs China/quality vs cheap POS

    Continental Spike Claw 240 Studded Tire:
    240 spikes embedded in the knobs for traction on ice. Aggressive yet well spaced knob structure has excellent traction yet resists packing up with mud and snow. Ample volume keeps tire from sinking easily. 3 plies/84 TPI. 65 PSI Max. Wire bead. 26 x 2.1 Inch (54-559 ISO). 900 grams.
    Innova Ice Husky Studded Snow Tire:
    The best value in studded mountain bike tires. The Ice Husky has 268 carbon steel studs and an aggressive tread for great traction on snow and ice. 26x2.1" (56-559). 35-65 psi. 1270 grams.

    Made in China.

    NOTE: It is normal for some studs to fall out of these tires from regular use. Studs can be replaced using the Innova replacement studs.

    So my question:

    Is it worth it to get the more expensive tires or will the Chinese tires be good enough?

  20. #20
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    ^^^I haven't tried either brand, but I'm guessing some of the price difference is carbon steel in the cheaper ones and carbide steel tipped studs on the expensive ones. Carbon steel is what many older kitchen knives are made out of - it is softer, so it is easier to sharpen,but it rusts and dulls up quick too. Carbide steel is much harder than regular steel, so the studs last longer. Whether or not it's worth the price difference probably depends on how much you'll use them, especialy on pavement.

  21. #21
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    double post

  22. #22
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    ^^^What he said^^^
    Last edited by cda 455; 11-29-2010 at 12:13 AM. Reason: Double post

  23. #23
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    Cda, I don`r have any more than hearsay info about any of those tires, but I`m sure Xplorer is right about the Innovas having soft studs. FWIW, there are high quality carbide studded tires available for a good bit less than those Contis. For example, you can get Nokian Mount&Ground with carbide studs for US$45 from Peter White, maybe less somewhere else if you look around. I bought my tires locally, but I have bought lighting stuff from him before- no problems at all. Take a gander at his website for some good info on studs even if you don`t end up buying.

    http://peterwhitecycles.com/studdedtires.asp
    Recalculating....

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by cda 455
    Are these price-overkill: Continental Spike Claw 240 Studded Tire

    They're made in Finland and run $89 a tire .

    Versus: Innova Ice Husky Studded Snow Tire at $44.99 a tire. Made in China.


    I'm concerned about QA: Finland vs China/quality vs cheap POS






    So my question:

    Is it worth it to get the more expensive tires or will the Chinese tires be good enough?
    No, as the other person mentioned, Innova tires (I know I've read about Innova tires specifically for this issue) use cheaper studs that will wear out if you ride much on pavement. One day they will work, then one day they will wear flush with the rubber tire and suddenly you won't have any studs any more. I'd rather ride with no studs (and I wouldn't ride with no studs, frankly) because at least then you know your tire isn't going to grip the ice, rather than being surprised by it when it suddenly happens.

    I've also heard of a couple of stories about Innova tires being defective in more traditional ways like the casing coming apart, but I don't really know how common that is.

    Nokian and Schwalbe studs (and perhaps Continental, but I don't know) are made out of tougher steel called carbide that from numerous accounts will last longer than than the rubber casing on the tire does.

    The only way I would consider Innova tires is if I was doing pure mountain biking in the woods where the tire would never come into contact with hard pavement, or perhaps in theory for an occasional 2nd winter bike for heavy snowstorms where, again, the tire would only contact ice and snow and almost never pavement. Though even there, I would personally buy the more expensive versions from Nokian or Schwalbe because I don't like to worry about it, and while they cost twice as much, they'll also likely last 2-3 times as long as well.

  25. #25
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    I know of three types of studs.

    Type 1 Steel studs whole thing made of an alloy steel...

    Type 2 Steel studs with carbide insert...stud made of steel....carbide tit inserts into end of stud to reduce wear.

    Type 3 Aluminium studs with carbide insert...stud made of aluminium...carbide tit inserts into end of stud to reduce wear...

    Type 1 garbage, Type 2 excellent but heavy, Type 3 excellent and light.

    However Type 3 studs will pullout of the tire easier than type 1 or 2.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar
    Cda, I don`r have any more than hearsay info about any of those tires, but I`m sure Xplorer is right about the Innovas having soft studs. FWIW, there are high quality carbide studded tires available for a good bit less than those Contis. For example, you can get Nokian Mount&Ground with carbide studs for US$45 from Peter White, maybe less somewhere else if you look around. I bought my tires locally, but I have bought lighting stuff from him before- no problems at all. Take a gander at his website for some good info on studs even if you don`t end up buying.

    http://peterwhitecycles.com/studdedtires.asp

    Thanks for the link !

    I've been to his website before looking at headlights powered by a hub generator.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    I know of three types of studs.

    Type 1 Steel studs whole thing made of an alloy steel...

    Type 2 Steel studs with carbide insert...stud made of steel....carbide tit inserts into end of stud to reduce wear.

    Type 3 Aluminium studs with carbide insert...stud made of aluminium...carbide tit inserts into end of stud to reduce wear...

    Type 1 garbage, Type 2 excellent but heavy, Type 3 excellent and light.

    However Type 3 studs will pullout of the tire easier than type 1 or 2.
    No, as the other person mentioned, Innova tires (I know I've read about Innova tires specifically for this issue) use cheaper studs that will wear out if you ride much on pavement. One day they will work, then one day they will wear flush with the rubber tire and suddenly you won't have any studs any more. I'd rather ride with no studs (and I wouldn't ride with no studs, frankly) because at least then you know your tire isn't going to grip the ice, rather than being surprised by it when it suddenly happens.

    I've also heard of a couple of stories about Innova tires being defective in more traditional ways like the casing coming apart, but I don't really know how common that is.

    Nokian and Schwalbe studs (and perhaps Continental, but I don't know) are made out of tougher steel called carbide that from numerous accounts will last longer than than the rubber casing on the tire does.

    The only way I would consider Innova tires is if I was doing pure mountain biking in the woods where the tire would never come into contact with hard pavement, or perhaps in theory for an occasional 2nd winter bike for heavy snowstorms where, again, the tire would only contact ice and snow and almost never pavement. Though even there, I would personally buy the more expensive versions from Nokian or Schwalbe because I don't like to worry about it, and while they cost twice as much, they'll also likely last 2-3 times as long as well.
    Excellent points to ponder.

  28. #28
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    I had a set of the cheap innovas, and they stunk.

    Rode them on pavement for a couple of weeks waiting for the snow. Then it snowed. Rode them once, was amazed at how utterly useless they were, and tossed them. Picked up a set of mount&ground which were infinitely better.

    The innovas might have soft studs, but I think the bigger problem is the overall stud design. Once the studs have "set" they are basically flush with the tread. On the nokians and schwalbes the carbide tips protrude a little bit, and they are what do a lot of the gripping. The innovas don't have that, and from my limited use I think that the recessed studs actually "skated" over ice more than than a plain knobby would.

    The innovas might be okay snow tires, but even in that situation I think most knobbies would work just as well.

  29. #29
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    I got the W240's last year. We had many early season snows and one killer ice storm. The side streets had 3" of ice for two months. I went down three times in two weeks. Third time put my ice riding to an end for the year. Right now we have about 8-10" of snow. Once it gets packed down a little I will try it again. What was the most treacherous for me are the grooves in the snow in the direction of travel. The tire is riding a side hill at that point. I'll try less PSI also. I hate riding the trainer inside. Been off the bike for 2 weeks now. had 10 days of 0f and below, add a north wind and it is down right rotten.
    Have fun! More studs the better!

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by WMBigs
    I got the W240's last year. We had many early season snows and one killer ice storm. The side streets had 3" of ice for two months. I went down three times in two weeks. Third time put my ice riding to an end for the year. Right now we have about 8-10" of snow. Once it gets packed down a little I will try it again. What was the most treacherous for me are the grooves in the snow in the direction of travel. The tire is riding a side hill at that point. I'll try less PSI also. I hate riding the trainer inside. Been off the bike for 2 weeks now. had 10 days of 0f and below, add a north wind and it is down right rotten.
    Have fun! More studs the better!
    What PSI were you running them?

    For Clydesdale's like me, 40 to 45PSI is the range for said tires.


  31. #31
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    If memory serves, they had about 50psi or so. 65 is suggested max.

  32. #32
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    I haven't ridden the 240's, but I'm 200 pounds and run my Schwalbe Marathon Winters at 30psi when conditions get sketchy out at all, one time when conditions were really really bad I ran them lower and it worked well (20psi? not sure, just let some air out).

    The 240 is a slightly wider tire, so it should be able to do at least 30psi. 50psi definitely sounds to much for less-than-ideal conditions - that outer row of studs might not even come into contact with the ground on ice at higher psi's.

    I wasn't riding in your conditions so I'm really not saying I know what would have or wouldn't have worked, but I haven't had any problems with going down in sheer ice, but when there's some significant snow that becomes the real problem - snow shifts and gives way under your wheel, there's just no fast way to get through it, and when there's a lot of snow or really uneven consistency it's just plain difficult to get through it without it being a little touchy. :-( Ice...ice can be dealt with with studs. Snow...not as easy to deal with.

  33. #33
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    I have a spare wheelset with 700x40 Kenda Klondikes mounted.
    I use them only if its Snowing when I leave or Snow is in the forecast for the commute home.

    I rode home last year in 12" of snow with the Klondikes on and 30psi. They work very good!

  34. #34
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    OK, I mounted the 240's. this will be my second season on them. Tried them out at40psi at first. OK in the front, could feel the rear bottom on the rim about 5-6 times in 7 miles. got to work ok, when it was time to leave the tire was flat. Filled it and rode straight home. Pinch flatted at 40. running 60 now and feels fine. The ice and snow is very rough.
    Hope we get a Chinook soon. Indian name for "snow eater".

  35. #35
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    Pinch flatting at 40psi on a 40c tire sounds very strange.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulRivers
    Nokian and Schwalbe studs (and perhaps Continental, but I don't know) are made out of tougher steel called carbide that from numerous accounts will last longer than than the rubber casing on the tire does.
    My wife has a pair of the 700c Continental Nordic Spike 240 on her commuting bike. They made it through their first winter with no notable stud wear, so they area definitely carbide. The bead and sidewall look identical to Nokians, between that and the "Made in Finland" on the sidewall, I am pretty sure Nokian makes them for Continental. So I'm guessing the same is the case for the 26" Continental Spike Claws.

    Personally, I'm interested in the Top Contact Winter II. They would roll a LOT faster than studded tires, and though they wouldn't be as good for very slick ice, I would think they'd be fine for most conditions. Just my assumptions though. Might be a little fat for the OP's needs: http://www.conti-online.com/generato...Winter_en.html
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  37. #37
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    That was 40 psi inside nice and warm. Outside at 20f, not sure what it drops to. The frozen ice and snow is very rough. My concentration is aimed more at not crashing than avoiding the bumps. Out of the saddle, no problem.
    Went for a ride last night to the bike shop. 12f when I left- cheeks feeling close to freezing. 8f when I got home- thats about my limit unless I can find a way to keep my face and nose warm.

  38. #38
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    Yeah, it's a Carhardt belaklava for me below about 10-15 F, 20 F if the wind is up. Above that I roll it up to cover the neck but face open, and have it just in case. Nothing says it's cold out there quite like prying the mustache-hair-reinforced matrix of frozen breath/snot off the belaklava at the end of the ride!

  39. #39
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    just got some marathon winters.
    waiting...

    (reviewing this thread I find the juxtaposition between the timing of this post yesterday, and the snow on the ground this morning, highly ironic)
    Last edited by byknuts; 12-06-2010 at 08:07 AM.
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  40. #40
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    Santa just ordered the 700-32 Nokian studded tires. Should have bough them in August and saved $16!

  41. #41
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    I'm undecided if I am going to run studded tires or not........

  42. #42
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    Reputation: langford's Avatar
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    I have Nokian Mount and Grounds on a spare set of wheels. They are the best when it's icy, but I don't like the extra effort required in riding them on bare pavement. It's not a big job to change wheels.
    I also have a pair of steel Schwalbe Marathons, they're easier on bare pavement, but I know they're wearing out quickly on bare pavement - I have these on another set of rims, I just use them for riding on icy trails.

  43. #43
    viva la v-brakes!
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    Quote Originally Posted by WMBigs
    Went for a ride last night to the bike shop. 12f when I left- cheeks feeling close to freezing. 8f when I got home- thats about my limit unless I can find a way to keep my face and nose warm.
    Balaclavas are great, I wear one any time its below 20 F. Also head to your local outdoor store and get some ideas in the ski gear section. There are some neoprene face masks out there that cover the whole face, excluding the eyes. They work really well, allowing me to be comfortable down to at least (most?) -12... haven't had to ride in anything colder recently. A thin, short scarf might work too. I wear mine with a very thin smartwool cap. That way when I arrive at my destination I can just take off my helmet and face mask and look "normal" pretty quickly. With the balaclava, I roll it up so it looks like a hat when I am on foot or indoors.
    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
    I have a car. I made a choice. I ride my bike.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by WMBigs
    I got the W240's last year. We had many early season snows and one killer ice storm. The side streets had 3" of ice for two months. I went down three times in two weeks. Third time put my ice riding to an end for the year. Right now we have about 8-10" of snow. Once it gets packed down a little I will try it again. What was the most treacherous for me are the grooves in the snow in the direction of travel. The tire is riding a side hill at that point. I'll try less PSI also. I hate riding the trainer inside. Been off the bike for 2 weeks now. had 10 days of 0f and below, add a north wind and it is down right rotten.
    Have fun! More studs the better!

    My W240 were shipped Monday! They should be here on the 28th.

    I'm going to start riding at 40PSI and see what happens.

  45. #45
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    I"ve been on the studs now about 3 weeks. A change from last year- put the platform pedals on. Not being clipped in is the only way to go. The ride home tonight had my front tire pushing out a few times- just rode through it. 6" new snow this past weekend. News said we were at 31" of snow for the season on the first day of winter. Still needing something for the face. The high during riding time last two days was 4f, low of 0.
    Keep warm!

  46. #46
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    Nice going, bigs, thats a lot of snow already. I did the same switch to flats & another thing I like about them is your feet stay warmer without that metal cleat on your feet. I have 2 face options....for the super-cold, a windbloc fleece face mask (velcroes in back), plus goggles. I had a neoprene one but it got more icky. A less restrictive feeling option I use for when its cold but not every mm has to be covered is a fleece neck tube warmer. You can pull it up for the colder downhills and push it down so you dont overheat or fog on the uphills. Mine has a half-zip, which is nice if you get warmer you can really get it out of the way without taking off your helmet.

    I needed the studs tonight too, snow accumulating fast.

  47. #47
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    2.3x 26" tires for snow

    I've been commuting for 3 winters now in montreal, i have 3 bikes that i set up for winter, one is my "snow bike", one my "ice" bike and the other my "easy weather" bike...the two first are studded, and the snow bike is my preffered choice: 2.3 x26" homebuilt studs on the sides (they just barely hit the asphalt on a straight when i run 25 psi).

    These a true floating tires, which is a LOT faster for me (I weight 150lbs) than to break through everything, which is what happens with my "ice bike" and it's 700x38 schwalbe snow studs. Also a lot of times when you cut through snow you hit ice underneath

    As for the cold, my record was -24C/-11F and ths is what I wear:
    -windproof jacket and pants
    -headband to cover my ears +forehead
    -dual lens non tinted ski goggles
    -neoprene face shield, the ones that follow the contour of the goggle and have an opening for nose and holes for mouth (I cut a larger hole for the mouth)
    -low-end shimano spd moutain bike shoes
    -lobster gloves

    I only have a 6 km per way commute, and for longer ride the only thing i would change would be foot covers...

    Also wouldn't ever consider not going clipless: so much more power in the thick snow, more even power throughout the pedal strokes and the ability to continue pedaling one-footed with the other ready to catch a fall...
    Last edited by damrtn; 12-22-2010 at 07:47 PM.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by damrtn
    ....Also wouldn't ever consider not going clipless: so much more power in the thick snow, more even power throughout the pedal strokes and the ability to continue pedaling one-footed with the other ready to catch a fall...
    That sounds worthy of a video!

  49. #49
    weirdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by cda 455
    I'm going to start riding at 40PSI and see what happens.
    Cool- I`m interrested to see how your pressures end up. My Marathons are super heavy to push if I don`t have them up pretty high, but if I get a little too much they try to rattle my teeth out.
    Recalculating....

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