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  1. #1
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    campus commuter

    hey everyone,

    So back to school for me and I have realized how decrepit my hardtail has become since building up my new bike. I only bring my hardtail to school because the fear of having my expensive bike stolen/beaten up from racks and stuff.

    So I'm here to ask a few questions about making my hardtail into a campus commuter that can take a little offroad at the same time. The bike I have to work with is a trek 3700.

    The biggest change im looking at currently is a fork. The one on it currently took some serious abuse in the past 2 years, is now stiff 90% of the time, and travels maybe half of what it is supposed to. Ive looked for info on how to rebuild it, but since its so low end i dont think it is worth it at all if its even possible. So here I am wondering the benefits of a rigid or low end 100mm fork I found :

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...o+Fork+10.aspx

    I have already changed my bars to flat bars and stem to a lower rise to put myself a little more forward. I know some slick tires may be on the list eventually, but the ones I have have low rolling resist. and can handle some dirt too.

    So back to the main question, rigid or not? Pros/Cons please

  2. #2
    nobody
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    Quote Originally Posted by futurerocker1
    hey everyone,

    So back to school for me and I have realized how decrepit my hardtail has become since building up my new bike. I only bring my hardtail to school because the fear of having my expensive bike stolen/beaten up from racks and stuff.

    So I'm here to ask a few questions about making my hardtail into a campus commuter that can take a little offroad at the same time. The bike I have to work with is a trek 3700.

    The biggest change im looking at currently is a fork. The one on it currently took some serious abuse in the past 2 years, is now stiff 90% of the time, and travels maybe half of what it is supposed to. Ive looked for info on how to rebuild it, but since its so low end i dont think it is worth it at all if its even possible. So here I am wondering the benefits of a rigid or low end 100mm fork I found :

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...o+Fork+10.aspx

    I have already changed my bars to flat bars and stem to a lower rise to put myself a little more forward. I know some slick tires may be on the list eventually, but the ones I have have low rolling resist. and can handle some dirt too.

    So back to the main question, rigid or not? Pros/Cons please
    I'd ditch the suspension and go rigid especially with the bar/stem changes you describe and if you're looking at putting slicks on. To me this means you're looking at more on than off road riding.

    A good rigid fork will be cheaper and lighter than a suspension fork and won't make your ride stand out in the bike rack while you're in class.

    I put together a rigid, steel SS for school from an early 90's mid-end Giant frame I found in the junk pile behind my lbs (they let me take it for $10). I opted for risers and semi-slicks and that thing worked great anywhere I needed to go. I even did a little light MTBing on occasion.

    Good luck, post up your bike when you're finished.
    I'm what Willis was talkin' about

  3. #3
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    Yeah, my fork is currently at the point where it is a 6 pound rigid lol. But my reasoning for considering buying the fork I linked was that then I could leave my full sus'er at home and hit the trails with the trek. All my friends want me to bring my other bike but my parents convinced me not to for now.

  4. #4
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I don't know the Marzocchi specifically, but a lot of suspension forks at that pricepoint give a worse ride than a rigid. Riding a rigid off-road is not that bad, especially with the big tires available now. If you're living off-campus and your house/apartment is reasonably secure, bring them both.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch
    I don't know the Marzocchi specifically, but a lot of suspension forks at that pricepoint give a worse ride than a rigid. Riding a rigid off-road is not that bad, especially with the big tires available now. If you're living off-campus and your house/apartment is reasonably secure, bring them both.
    I take both I have a single speed built up with cheap parts for riding campus, and my dualy for when I go mountain biking.

  6. #6
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    I think bringing both is the best option for me. I've lofted my bed so that there is enough room for two maybe even 3 bikes there.

    So I guess that means I will try to make my trek into a commuting machine..
    What would be your suggestions for other upgrades or changes to it?

    I suppose first on the list would be go rigid, then get slicks/semi slicks. I do like the simplicity of single speed, but I do find myself shifting around campus even though its relatively flat, so maybe it isn't for me?

    Any other suggestions?

  7. #7
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    How long is your commute?

    My experience of using bikes to get around town is that as long as the bike goes and stops and doesn't have excessive drivetrain friction or rolling resistance, it's not worth spending a lot of time or money on tuning or upgrades. A rack can be really nice, though, if you need to haul stuff and panniers make sense for you.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  8. #8
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    commute isnt long at all, I kinda just like tricking out my bikes but if I did it then I could use it to commute next summer to work as well, which would be about 10 miles both ways

  9. #9
    nobody
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    Quote Originally Posted by futurerocker1
    I think bringing both is the best option for me. I've lofted my bed so that there is enough room for two maybe even 3 bikes there.

    So I guess that means I will try to make my trek into a commuting machine..
    What would be your suggestions for other upgrades or changes to it?

    I suppose first on the list would be go rigid, then get slicks/semi slicks. I do like the simplicity of single speed, but I do find myself shifting around campus even though its relatively flat, so maybe it isn't for me?

    Any other suggestions?
    Even with your bikes inside, get some good locks espeically if you have roommates. Not that they would jack your bike but with friends of friends in and out all day long you never know.
    I'm what Willis was talkin' about

  10. #10
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    yeah, im going to have to pick up another lock, thats a good idea

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