Camping

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  • 05-05-2010
    locobaylor
    Camping
    This might be in the wrong forum, but I'll try anyways. Does anyone know of any good bags that can be used for mountain biking camping? I saw this dealer in another forum:
    http://carouseldesignworks.com/main.html
    I didn't know if anyone else had any other ideas or suggestions. Hopefully I'll do at least one overnight trip this summer, as it seems like it would be super fun.
    Thanks.
  • 05-06-2010
    maelgwn
    Try epic designs : http://www.epicdesignsalaska.com/ - shorter lead time and better communication, standard of the product is equally high.

    Have a look at bikepacking.net
  • 05-06-2010
    CommuterBoy
    Anything that is down and not synthetic will pack a little smaller and be a little lighter...same rules apply as backpacking in terms of size and weight being critical factors. The downside to down is that it does not insulate when it it gets wet. If your trip will be wet, synthetic would be better. I've had bags from The North Face and Sierra Designs, and currently I have a Marmot 15 degree bag (and I've never wanted a warmer one temperature wise), even on top of Mt. Whitney and Mt. Shasta (and I doubt you're riding higher than that)... don't go for a crazy warm bag that would be overkill.... Ed Viesturs (mountaineering superhero) uses a 15 degree bag on Everest if that gives you an idea... a zero degree bag for a summer bike trip would probably be silly overkill (especially if your username refers to Texas).
  • 05-06-2010
    martinsillo
  • 05-06-2010
    rodar y rodar
    I`ve never used them (or even seen them in person), but Epic and Carousel are both very well talked up by the hardcore multi-day mtb guys. If that`s what you`re comtemplating, give a wander through bikepacking.net After giving their methods some consideration (it looks like tons of fun), I finally had to admit to myself that I`m too much of a pansy to tour that way, but they have some really innovative ideas and I`ve borrowed a few of them for my own style of touring. You might also do a search on "bikepacking" over in the Passion subforum- a lot of the same characters from bp.net hang out there and post up some amazing ride reports. If you mean touring on paved or unpaved roads, as opposed to gnarly ST, panniers or a trailer would probably be more suitable. Easier to pack larger loads, arguably cheaper, but they do have a definite weight problem compared to frame bags and don`t like to bash through alder and manzanita.
  • 05-06-2010
    Surly29
    www.jandd.com

    Jandd also has some nice things on the cheaper side. I put a handlebar bag, frame bag, and seat bag on my bike for around $100. The Mtn. Wedge III seat bag is big enough for a 40^ bag, or in my case cooking pots, stove and food and the vertical straps really help prevent swaying.

    I would prefer an Epic handlebar harness, though, as I think it would secure the front load much better.
  • 05-06-2010
    umarth
    Bikepacking is good fun, but I'd prefer to camp out somewhere and hit trails from a base camp so you can ride without all the crap.

    If you are not going out for more than one night, I've found that tying compression sacks with velcro straps on the handlebars and under the saddle to the rails works well. Just make sure it doesn't hit your legs under the rails. I had a crappy frame wedge and a packpack too, but the backpack was mostly food and water. Good luck.
  • 05-06-2010
    CommuterBoy
    Ha. Are you talking about frame bags or sleeping bags? Becuase I am apparently an idiot and I rarely click on links. If I see 'camping' and 'bags' in the same post, I'm going to assume it's sleepy time.
  • 05-07-2010
    locobaylor
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by CommuterBoy
    Ha. Are you talking about frame bags or sleeping bags? Becuase I am apparently an idiot and I rarely click on links. If I see 'camping' and 'bags' in the same post, I'm going to assume it's sleepy time.

    haha, i'm talking frame bags. I was kind of wondering where you were going with all of your helpful info on sleeping bags. and no, my name isn't in reference to texas, fyi :thumbsup:
  • 05-07-2010
    rodar y rodar
    Yeah, but those down frame bags are incredibly light.
  • 05-07-2010
    PscyclePath
    I put a Delta rack on my 26" hardtail so that I can use regular panniers or a rack trunk...

    You might also check the publications archive at Adventure Cycling Assn. (http://www.adventurecycling.org) and look for the articles by Aaron Teasdale on his ultralight MTB tours and extended rides... some really good suggestions there. I use light panniers instead of the backpack, and carry about the same sort of gear...