The best BMX commuter build you can imagine- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    The best BMX commuter build you can imagine

    First time poster here.

    I have a 2011 specialized RH 26 with newly installed SunWringle Charger Pros and a TK Recon Gold front fork. I had the front fork put on four days ago. I weigh 225 with a background in BMX. I use my bike to commute 20-30 miles a day over a very chunky concrete jungle of broken sidewalks and big curbs. I like to go big.

    Jumped the RH off of a five step with the fork locked out and pumped to 200PSI. I love the locked out fork with the high PSI because of the pogo effect on bunny hops. I've cleared some BIG dirty concrete with the method. Well, this is the first time I've had a decent front shock and it looks like I've managed to "blow it" in four days (LBS), which seems like total ******** in my opinion.

    Is there a shock out there that can handle 225 pounds of BMX city strength? I see these guys jumping off of ****ing the sides of mountains and I'm just confused about why I blew out a $400 shock in four days of street riding.

    "These shocks are made for downhill trails not aggro BMX" -LBS

    Are the streets really more hardcore than the mountain? What is the ultimate BMX commuter build?

  2. #2
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    I don't know much about shocks, but, 200 PSI and locked out seems like an odd mix to me. Did you blow the lock mechanism? Or did the fork fail because one side dampens and the other floats?

    I wouldn't call the streets hardcore, but they are hard. Pavement will not give like dirt, and the tires will bite more rather than sliding to dissipate shocks and sideways forces when you stick a landing.

  3. #3
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    I just picked the bike back up from the shop and they said it was an issue with the dampening. They also said I had damaged the lockout mechanism, which they said they replaced a cable on. All work was comped by the shop BTW. The LBS guys are very cool.

    The jump that did it was a five step with a handrail. I cleared the handrail near the bottom of the jump and leaned forward more than I probably should have on the jump. I forgot the lockout was on when I tried it, but I still get plenty of play which I guess is due to the turnkey. In fact, it feels like just the right amount of shock absorption with it locked out for a big stair jump with the shock pumped to 200. Also, I've found that pumping up the shock and locking it out works great for general bunny hops over curbs with a little pogo pre jump quick pressure right over the handle bars to get a launch over the obstacle. I called a tech at SRAM who told me high PSI and bunny hopping on a locked out fork is a sure fire method to destroy the fork. I guess I'm just disappointed because the pogo method works really well for a jump up. The jump down took a little of both. I had to bunny hop hard to get over that rail and then was so far forward there was another bounce off the front rim when I landed. *barely

  4. #4
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    You broke the fork because the lock out was on. The first rule of MTB is lock outs are for climbing. Higher end forks will have a "blow off" type mechanism is case you forget. Sounds like you need a rigid, dirt jumper style fork.

  5. #5
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    I suspect Jetta Mike is right. 200 PSI is pretty high as well.

    Some back of the bar napkin calculations suggest that if your tire deforms to create a 5 square inch contact patch on landing (assuming some lower pressure BMX type tires here) you would need 1000 lbs of impact to make the shocks move at all. 225 lbs on a 35 lb bike might give that much slam with a five foot drop, but your front tire is probably flattening even more as well as rolling to dissipate the shock.

    To make a long and factually inaccurate story short, I don't think you would notice a lot of difference in a rigid fork with the right tires, especially if you are jumping with the lockout engaged. You might consider a steel fork and some kevlar shorts.

  6. #6
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    Chances are you just killed the compression damper. Not hard to do on, don't take this the wrong way, a lower-mid level fork. Lock outs are for climbing and pavement. They essentially stop the flow of oil and if forced the oil will find a way. If your gonna be launching stair sets you should get a dj or rigid fork. You should also consider getting a frame that is built to take that kind of abuse before you rip you head tube or bb off.

  7. #7
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    Why would you say a suspension fork is great if you ride it locked out?

    Buy a rigid fork. Or better yet, if you like the pogo, buy a fully rigid fat bike and pump up the tires.

    Also, search google images for "BMX bikes". You might be surprised by what you see.

  8. #8
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    Yes, mashing on a locked out fork will destroy it. Why is this a surprise to you? What did you think the lockout was for?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetta_mike View Post
    You broke the fork because the lock out was on.
    You broke the fork because you abused it!

    You either didn't bother checking what the fork is designed for or ignored it. Then you ignored the operating instructions. Then you wonder why it breaks?

    You're actually quite fortunate. I reckon you could fold that fork in half landing it that hard. You could be asking questions on a dental forum now ;0) And your local bike shop are wrong if they told you the forks are ok for Down Hill, they won't take that either. It's a Cross Country fork which means relatively light off road trails with only small jumps/drops.

    If all else fails, read the instructions. Go onto the Rock Shox website and take a look at the different forks and what they are designed for. Then you need to buy one of the forks that's ok for jumping, that'll be one without aluminium stanchions for a start, and then you need to follow the instructions. Not lock the thing up solid then wonder why it can't compress.

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  10. #10
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    Let's not be to hard on the guy. He may have learned the hard way but I will bet we have all done something similar. Being a BMX rider myself I can tell you that on a cost to durability basis a 400$ BMX fork would have been indestructible. It would have also been about a million times simpler then any suspension fork. Going from BMX to MTBs can be a huge "culture" shock, give him leeway.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_papa_nuts View Post
    Going from BMX to MTBs can be a huge "culture" shock, give him leeway.
    Well...naaaa ;0) I'd rather risk ruffling his feathers a little if it might knock some sense into him. It's not a game, you could get hurt.

    We have a friend who's the same, just don't show any common sense at all. Two of us were just talking about how he rode round Arran with dodgy brakes, They just needed adjusted and he couldn't be bothered doing it. Arran has some pretty fast descents and he overshot a corner, went over the kerb and ended up on the beach!

  12. #12
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    firstly, a Rockhopper is not designed to be ridden like that. it's a cross-country mountain bike. the fork, even when properly set up, is not made to handle blasting down stairs. then you cranked up the air spring AND locked it out. on top of that, you are aware that you are a heavy rider. you sabotaged your fork. I am surprised it lasted jumping off a curb let alone "BMX" shenanigans.

    everything else about that bike is not designed for jumping, street riding, "urban assault," etc. it's an XC mountain bike. put a heavy rider on it, and you're just asking to destroy everything on that bike. you are lucky that the fork failed mechanically because that kind of riding is abuse. you could have sheared the head tube off the frame, bent the fork, snapped a crank arm, etc. lesson learned.

    what you need is A) a dirt jump/urban mountain bike that can handle that kind of stuff, and can have the saddle raised so you can pedal long distances without destroying your knees, or B) two bikes- one strong for jumping and thrashing and one for commuting from A to B.

    I have ridden bmx for about 20 years (not much the last few) and using a rigid, single-speed bike with a low saddle to ride distances more than five miles at a time sounds like torture. a bike that is set up well for hucking stairs, jumping, gaps, tricks, etc is never, ever going to be good for riding long distances, if you want to get to your destination with any sort of haste and if you want to have any energy left to do whatever it is you plan to do (work, party, etc) when you get there. so if you want a bike just for BMX-type stuff, get a dirt jump mountain bike or a bmx bike, or something in the middle like a Fairdale
    Taj
    .

    for riding longer distances, you would do just fine on your Rockhopper but a road bike or hybrid would be much more efficient. you will have to resist the urge to jump down stairs and stuff on such a bike, but it will get you there much faster!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by prosurfer View Post
    Is there a shock out there that can handle 225 pounds of BMX city strength? I see these guys jumping off of ****ing the sides of mountains and I'm just confused about why I blew out a $400 shock in four days of street riding.
    $400 is on the cheap end of suspension fork prices. you can't get anything decent for under $300 these days. if you want a fork that will handle big jumps, you need something like this: https://www.sram.com/rockshox/family/pike the Pike runs about $800. You could also look into an Argyle which is cheaper. however, it probably wont' work well on your Rockhopper, which was not made to handle that kind of stuff anyway. the fork might be too long to work on your bike and could cause the frame to crack.

  14. #14
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    You are better off getting a 24" bmx, an XL bmx bike, a dirtjumper mountain bike, a trials bike, etc. rather than dicking around with a standard XC hardtail with suspension fork like it was some bmx. As to why the street is more harsh, it is obvious. Concrete and asphalt make for harder landings than trails which usually have at least some dirt. When you bunny hop curbs and miss and the rear wheel slams into the curb, it is hitting a hard slab of concrete oriented at a 90 degree angle that doesn't exist in nature with the rocks that type of hardtail was meant to handle. BMX bikes have shorter spokes at 20" so it is comparatively stiffer and thus harder to get the wheel out of true.

    Alot of my friends are dolts like you. I tell them that hybrid, road and mountain bikes are not bmx bikes, if they want to dick around doing bunny hops and other nonsense on the street, buy a bmx. They don't listen and they trash their bikes, they don't maintain them properly and their bikes ride like crap. Which is stupid because they could get serviceable used bmx bikes for $50-100 on craigslist.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by prosurfer View Post
    ... 20-30 miles a day over a very chunky concrete jungle of broken sidewalks and big curbs. I like to go big....
    Not sure if trolling now... So you want to ride perhaps the most sub-optimal bike possible to jump the occasional curb, and go down stairs on a commute?

  16. #16
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    Gee Whiz fellas the bike has been doing a great job getting me to work 20-30 miles EVERY DAY over the past two years. It was the only hard-tail 26 the LBS had at the time, and I actually love my bike. I've bent the rims quite a few times and, yes it is a budget bike, but I live in South Texas. There are NO mountains here and my ride to work *is my thrill seeking time. It's much more than the occasional curb or staircase. I seek out challenges during my commute. Now, It doesn't hurt my feelings that ya'll want to talk ****, but Jesus Christ some of you guys sound like snobby cockmasters.

  17. #17
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    It's got nothing to do with being a snob. It has everything to do with trying to stop a moron with a death wish upsetting his family, I assume they would miss you? Maybe not, either way I don't know how surprised I would be.

    Your bike will break. It will hurt. These facts are inevitable I'm afraid as you are too stupid to avoid them. Look up inevitable. You told your bike shop you broke the fork and they said 'it's not built for that'. You told a mountain bike forum that you broke your fork and everyone on it said 'It's not built for that'. As you're clearly disappointed with this advice why not ask at your local kindergarten, I'm sure you'll find some dudes there who think you are dead clever and your bike can do anything. Look up disappointed.

    Beyond that there isn't much else we can say. What you have there isn't a fix for.

  18. #18
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    That was a bit harsh, Pig. But I generally agree.

    We are not being snobs, we are being truthful. No way to sugarcoat the fact that you were using your bike in a way that was never intended and your ignorance (which was your choice) caused this.

    Go read this thread. You sound just as hard headed:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/downhill-free...ke-625231.html

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    Lets be specific please Mack. Your posts prior to the last one actually had pertinent information. Did you read all the others? I didn't even single out a particular cockmaster, just pointed out that *some of the responses here sound to me like they are being crafted by douche bags with something to prove. The kind of people who get on the internet to call people names as opposed to *contributing something meaningful to a *discussion. Call me crazy, but i do think that a blog about bicycling and sharing experiences should be...well just that. I asked a question, I got some answers. I'm learning some things. It's not like I just started jumping off **** yesterday. I get that it was dangerous (and a little stupid) to lock a fork out and go big. When I typed the question I didn't know that. I'm LEARNING. I even talked to someone at SRAM about it. I'm looking at other builds and contemplating my commuter strategy. I get that a rock-hopper is not optimal for jumping staircases, and I appreciate the concerns for my safety. What I don't get is the personal attacks for positing a question about bicycles on a forum about bicycles, but seriously if you want to keep talking about my life as though you *actually have a clue about who I am then you can GFY cockmaster. Sounds like I have made some bad decisions with my bicycle. Thanks everybody for your guidance. (I don't think the word fact means what you think it means pig)

  20. #20
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    So back to the discussion: what knid of builds are you considering? Making a bike that is strong and handles well for jumping and stuff, AND is somewhat efficient to ride is very difficult to do. I think a jumping-oriented hardtail with a 1x9 drivetrain and a tall seatpost that you can easily lower might be the ticket. Transition, Black Market, Surly Instigator come to mind.

  21. #21
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    This one looks sick

    TRANSITION BLT with Rock Shox Argyle (DJ fork):
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The best BMX commuter build you can imagine-transition.jpg  


  22. #22
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    for the amount of miles you are riding, I would want something with gears! or get two bikes- one for commuting and one for shredding.

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    Why do most BMX bikes go with a single speed? Is it a weight thing? I don't mind standing on my commute. It's 10 miles one way with around 10 at lunch and 10 to go home. Standing for most of my ride is the norm unless the wind is bad, but having some gear options certainly helps chew up the distance.

  24. #24
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    A bmx bike is rarely actually pedalled for more than a hundred feet at a time. You need a drivetrain that is just efficient enough to propel you fast enough in a short distance to send you off a ramp, give you enough momentum to manual or grind something, or keep your speed through a line of dirt jumps. When the ramp is ten feet away, you don't have time to shift. Also, can you imagine trying to grind a handrail with a derailleur hanging next to your peg? Or trying to keep your momentum while pedaling backwards on a fakie with more than one gear?

    Go watch some modern bmx videos. A bmx bike, moreso than most other bikes, is a toy. It is not meant to be a form of trasportation. It can be used for transportation, but it is possibly the worst tool for the job. (i guess a trials bike would be worse!) Bmx bikes need to be as simple as possible for that reason.

    A lot of people commute on single-speed bikes. That might work for you, but you have to realize that a geared bike will be more efficient and it is what you are used to.

    Serious question: have you mapped your commute to confirm that it's actually 20-30 miles? I used to commute 7.5 miles to work on a cyclocross bike with narrow slick tires and it always took me 30-40 minutes. I would think that stoppng to sesh some stairs along the way wold turn a 30 miler into a three-hour ordeal or longer.

  25. #25
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    If you stand to ride for 20 miles a day, expect to shell out for knee replacement surgery in a few years. That sounds effing brutal.

  26. #26
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    here is a bike to consider. It would not suck much riding 20 miles, and you could huck it.
    Specialized Bicycle Components

    I still think a fat bike is what you need.

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    sorry i was replying to another guy cant figure out how to delete

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    That bike looks awesome. Thanks for sharing the link. I've seen people riding fat bikes here on the beach. It looks like a lot of work to pedal.

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    Yes, I have mapped it out. Ten is an exaggeration. It's like 9.6 or so, and the lunch is optional so sometimes it may even be under 20. Wind is a huge factor here. I have made the ride in under 30 minutes on plenty of days and then there are days with the wind in my face where it is much more than that. There are several spots along the route where I like to hop. A loading dock in back of a parking lot with ramp access, a triangle buckled piece of concrete that literally makes me feel like I'm flying. There is also a detour through a school with a series of 3 steps that I have to wake up early to hit but occasionally do. There is also a concrete ditch with some big transitions, and curbage everywhere. In the last couple of years I've bent my rims to the point of total destruction, but figured that was par for the course. I had the same experience with my skyway mags on the Hutch i used to roll. The sunwringles have been holding up like champs so far, but I don't mind spending money on them if I do twack them. My shoulders ache all the time. I swim a lot so that probably contributes to it, and it may be my imagination, but it seems like the shock is helping out a lot with that. I have had days where I have ridden pretty much the whole way standing. Those would be down wind days. Most of the time it's 50/50, and my knees never hurt. I actually feel like standing gives me a better workout and helps keep me off my dick. I don't usually time it, but yes there are days where I am on my bike for three hours.
    Last edited by prosurfer; 09-22-2014 at 09:00 PM.

  30. #30
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    Strava or it didn't happen. Either you are full of BS or you should be paid a lot of money to ride a bike like that because you are really, really fast. Why are you not a pro yet? If you can ride that much, that fast, you could absolutely smoke anyone in any cycling discipline.

    If your knees are not hurting from tearing your tendons apart now, they will. Or you are some sort of god-man with indestructable joints.

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    omfg sorry i don't have it mapped out for you with the splits. Thanks for the advice doc. Also, I don't know how it is where you ride, but down here on the coast where the wind regularly blows 15 plus miles per hour and often plus twenty it is very possible for a one way ride of 9.6 miles to go under thirty minutes if you ride hard with a strong tailwind. To call me out as a liar because I don't have the GPS data for you is just ridiculous. On the flip side, with that wind in my face the same ride can take over an hour. It's so funny how you led me by the hand on that little troll stroll, so you could try to call me out as this big liar, but your gotcha moment says waaay more about you broham. The truth is I am very fast. That is true whatever you care to believe. How fast? As fast as i can possibly push it. I pass traffic in the 20mph school zones, but I'm just talking about my ride to work on a bike forum where I am asking for advice- not trying to prove a court case to you. I look at my cell phone when I wake up and give myself 30 minutes of play time in case I'm late and I go for it. When I get to work I look down at my cell phone again and sometimes I think. Damn that was fast. Sorry if that doesn't cut the mustard for the bicycle King here.

  32. #32
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    Some BMXs (as in racing) have gears but it very uncommon. Four cross bikes, which is pretty much MTB BMX, usually have 1x setups. Freestyle bikes don't have gears because they would make the bike easier to break, though some dj/street MTB bikes will have 1x setups.

    I still think getting a dj, 4x, or am hardtail with a dj or rigid fork and a 1x setup would be the op's best bet. Ridden as it is the fork he has is going to have a very short life and I'm, seriously, worried that his frame is gonna break possibly causing injury (and makin it hard to get to work). That Surly Instigator with B wheels would be sick.

    I also used to ride my BMX to work. It's faster an easier then you would think, but after getting used to a hybrid I don't think I'd go back. That's how you wind up with 9 bikes I guess.

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    I don't want to break my bike. The five step was a, "hey I just put these nice rims and this shock on. I've always wanted to try this and now is the time" Apparently, that was an ill thought out decision. The bike shop, SRAM, and this forum have made that abundantly clear. Is the Rockhopper frame really too weak for say somewhat regular 3 step jumps? A buckled frame would just be a nightmare.

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    With a lower PSI front suspension, the Rockhopper might be alright if there are no handrails to jump. Someone else here will have better info on that.

    If you are serious about jumping while commuting, and willing to compromise a little, the fat bike suggestion is worth looking into. Otherwise, forks made for jumping or at least for landing might reduce the strain on your head tube.

    A frame failure would be catastrophic. Aluminum and stainless are great materials, but fail with few visible signs after being flexed too hard, too often. I would look to a steel frame and touring wheels for your use.

  35. #35
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    "strava or it didn't happen" is a joke that cyclists throw around. sorry it went over your head. but when you come to a forum saying that you are 225 pounds and hucking an XC bike down staircases and you are surprised that your are breaking stuff, then you are specific about how fast and far you ride, you sounds kinda cocky and arrogant. can you blame us for being a big snarky with someone who sounds cocky and arrogant?

    I am glad riding gives you the sensation of flying! it does that for me too. I think perception is our own reality but it does not stand up to objective reality. I have felt like I was 12 feet in the air over a box jump, but if someone was rolling a camera while I jumped, i would see that I was only 4 feet in the air. forgive us if we are skeptical of someone's claims when they are using an XC bike to jump stairs. maybe you really are that fast, but if you have the opportunity, clock yourself with a mapping application if you have a smart phone, or fit one of those cycle computers on your bike for a few days.

    speed limits are there for a reason. you're probably going over 20 MPH through a school zone because people are driving the speed limit because they are picking up their children from school! those speed limits apply to bikes too. be careful not to get a ticket. I know that is beside the point, but it's worth mentioning. anyone can sprint on a bicycle at 20 mph. keeping that up for mile after mile is much more difficult. just sayin.

    I don't think your bike is going to suddenly have a catastrophic failure. however, it might develop a small crack, which will turn into a big crack, then fail catastrophically. that can even happen to the toughest BMX and DJ bikes. give your bike a through cleaning and check every joint and tube for cracks. if you see one, stop riding it immediately.if you have destroyed wheels and a fork already, I would not be surprised if the frame has sustained some damage.

    regarding knees- ask anyone who has ridden a BMX bike for more than ten years about knee problems. I am going to stick to my position in that regard- you are going to blow up your knees that way. don't say I didn't warn you.

    anyhow, you came to this forum for advice about a new bike. find anything interesting?

  36. #36
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    Santa Cruz Chameleon would be a good option. I would highly recommend a dropper seatpost for your purposes. Put it up for pedaling and drop it for hucking. Some not-too-heavy FR or DH wheels with a 1x10 drivetrain with a nice wide range (11-36 probably) and a chain guide. I would try to use a rear derailleur with a clutch, between that and a good chain guide, your drivetrain should be pretty solid.

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    I don't know if this guy is this dumb or just a troll. I seriously doubt a guy who weighs 225 lbs., rides a hardtail on pavement, is totally clueless about bikes(and thus probably has never done structured training) averages a 30 minute commute over 10 miles = a 20 mph average(put a hypothetical person who could manage those times, and not on our original poster who likely cannot, on a road bike they would almost keep pace with pros). That is with traffic and in addition to the obsession of acting like bmx'er wannabe. Maybe he just likes to type whatever and doesn't think people will call him out.

    You can do whatever you want, we don't really care. But to do what you are doing on your commuter bike is just stupid and many people have told you why. At least I thank you for showing how foolish the "I like do bmx tricks" on my commute crowd are. The idiots in real life who I know who do that, trash their bikes, don't maintain them properly and just get another bike eventually wau too fast or stop riding. There are people who are good at manualing, bunny hops, etc. and who can land fairly soft on pavement, but there aren't many and they probably don't weigh as much as you. That is why it is dumb to do it on your commute, especially on a bike not purpose built, especially if you are not made of money.

    In general even the "cyclists" posting on commuting sub-forums are heavily car dependent and exaggerate their bicycle usage for commuting and other utilitarian purposes. A bicycle that rides very poorly is a deterrent to cycling and what you want to do with the bike you want to commute with, insures you will have a bike that rides poorly. You can get a bike good for jumping like a used bmx or dirt jumper, but it will commute poorly! But don't worry, you are the type that will assure us you hit a new personal record and made your 10 mile commute in 25 minutes on a bmx, lol.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by RoyFokker View Post
    I don't know if this guy is this dumb or just a troll. I seriously doubt a guy who weighs 225 lbs., rides a hardtail on pavement, is totally clueless about bikes(and thus probably has never done structured training) averages a 30 minute commute over 10 miles = a 20 mph average(put a hypothetical person who could manage those times, and not on our original poster who likely cannot, on a road bike they would almost keep pace with pros). That is with traffic and in addition to the obsession of acting like bmx'er wannabe. Maybe he just likes to type whatever and doesn't think people will call him out.

    You can do whatever you want, we don't really care. But to do what you are doing on your commuter bike is just stupid and many people have told you why. At least I thank you for showing how foolish the "I like do bmx tricks" on my commute crowd are. The idiots in real life who I know who do that, trash their bikes, don't maintain them properly and just get another bike eventually wau too fast or stop riding. There are people who are good at manualing, bunny hops, etc. and who can land fairly soft on pavement, but there aren't many and they probably don't weigh as much as you. That is why it is dumb to do it on your commute, especially on a bike not purpose built, especially if you are not made of money.

    In general even the "cyclists" posting on commuting sub-forums are heavily car dependent and exaggerate their bicycle usage for commuting and other utilitarian purposes. A bicycle that rides very poorly is a deterrent to cycling and what you want to do with the bike you want to commute with, insures you will have a bike that rides poorly. You can get a bike good for jumping like a used bmx or dirt jumper, but it will commute poorly! But don't worry, you are the type that will assure us you hit a new personal record and made your 10 mile commute in 25 minutes on a bmx, lol.
    Seriously, why do you care so much? You think HE'S a troll? Talk about the pot calling the kettle black. You troll every thread possible talking about how most people here aren't real cyclists because they also drive. At least he's not trying to insult the majority of members on this forum. Just because you don't agree with him doesn't make him dumb or a troll.

  39. #39
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    What he writes is just plain dumb, and so he is, if he is not just jerking us around. Either you get a suitable bike for a one-way 10 mile commute, or you get a bike suitable to jump down stairs, curbs, loading docks. You cannot get both in one. End of story.

    That you defend him is no surprise from reading your past posts. The butthurt in you is strong. There are lots of people like you around, who feel bad when things are called out for what they are. My advice to you: stop being ridiculous.

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    Hello darkness, my old friend ...

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by RoyFokker View Post
    What he writes is just plain dumb, and so he is, if he is not just jerking us around. Either you get a suitable bike for a one-way 10 mile commute, or you get a bike suitable to jump down stairs, curbs, loading docks. You cannot get both in one. End of story.

    That you defend him is no surprise from reading your past posts. The butthurt in you is strong. There are lots of people like you around, who feel bad when things are called out for what they are. My advice to you: stop being ridiculous.
    "The butthurt in your is strong"? Almost as mature as when you negative repped me and calling me "ghey".

    I'm not defending his choice of bikes or how he uses his bike, but instead of telling he's dumb you could try to be constructive. I'm fine with you disagreeing with him, what I'm not fine with is someone coming on this forum and flat out calling someone an idiot because they have a difference in opinion from you.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    If you stand to ride for 20 miles a day, expect to shell out for knee replacement surgery in a few years. That sounds effing brutal.
    Not to be facetious, but this being a mountain bike forum the question doesn't seem necessarily rhetorical: have you seen Alberto Contador (or the late Marco Pantani for that matter) ride a bike? The man warms up standing on the pedals. Not that I'd recommend it for everyone, but it doesn't seem to have hindered him much.

  43. #43
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    My commute is about 8.5 miles or so, and it takes me about 30 minutes or so to get there. I am riding a bike designed to go fast on the road, and I usually ride it that way hitting about 18-19 mph for most of the ride. The commute time includes stop signs, lights, traffic, etc. Picturing in my mind, a 225 lb guy riding a BMX bike keeping up with me is cracking me up. I am not saying that it cannot be done, but the thought of it just makes me laugh.

    OP - you need to decide what it is that you want to do here. Commuting that distance on a BMX bike seems ridiculous if you ask me. If you are comfortable in doing that, go for it. Your body is going to hate you eventually because that much riding on a daily basis, on a bike that really is not designed for commuting will catch up with you. You want a bike that will do everything, including jumping off of stair sets, etc. There is no bike that will do it all. You will sacrifice comfort on a BMX bike and durability on a commuter. If you ask me, you need to pick which aspect of riding is the most important to you, and go with that. Your current setup is not ideal for what you are doing with it, as the frame and components simply are not made for that.
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  44. #44
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    You know why this guy can ride standing up for so long and so damn quickly? Because he's a pro surfer. Figure it out, ya ass-hats.
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  45. #45
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    I must take a chance and ask 'cuz you dudes seem to know your sschidt...I know crappola...I have a sr suntour xct jr for 406 rims, want to replace springs with something that will manage my 230 pound overweight bod...sun only makes one spring for that fork...any help?
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    That is a really basic low end fork. Need something better.

  47. #47
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    Im running 2.35" Schwalbe Big Apples on my old Raleigh Twenty mounted onto 406/20" DJ hoops and riggid recumbent/BMX fork.... i think i run pressure 20 psi which provides me plenty of squish for commuting, but i weigh 125lb. For a better quality sus fork the OP might google "recumbent suspension fork" i hear HP Velo bents run some pretty bomber 20" sus forks on their touring rigs

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by CabezaShok View Post
    Im running 2.35" Schwalbe Big Apples on my old Raleigh Twenty mounted onto 406/20" DJ hoops and riggid recumbent/BMX fork.... i think i run pressure 20 psi which provides me plenty of squish for commuting, but i weigh 125lb. For a better quality sus fork the OP might google "recumbent suspension fork" i hear HP Velo bents run some pretty bomber 20" sus forks on their touring rigs
    I understand and thanks.

    My problem is already own them and figured should not be hard to swap springs out and let it go. I am not big rider and the forks that came with the Swift are okay, just wanted something a little forgiving, if I stick an electric hub to ease going up hill to house.

    I am not up on suspension forks etc, and figured springs are springs and so on, and should be easier to find comparable spring to stiffen the suspension.
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  49. #49
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    Something along the lines of a P-bike with a couple mods would work great IMO if you're fine with singlespeed.



    I used to ride my trail bikes in the city all the time and hit stair sets, wall drops and whatnot left and right. So do lots of people; the versatility of an mtb is perfect for that sort of riding. I don't see why some people are making a big ****ing deal about it.

    A fat bike would suck for what the OP is doing, but I understand that when you buy one, you have to sign an agreement that says you promise to mention it at least a dozen times a day.
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  50. #50
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    As noted, am committed, having bought the bike...below. It is a Xootr Swift, a quick and very solid folder.

    It replaces a GEBE assisted, crank-forward 26-inch rig. I used the motor to assist riding up the 1/2 ti 3/4 mile 4% grade to my house...miserable climb on hot day...

    The rig does have a factory installed Thudbuster seat/post, larger diameter seat post...the seat post is part of what gives the bike its rigidity unfolded.

    I bought the SR Suntour XCT Jr 406 suspension fork with idea to replace soft springs with stiffer ones and install.

    Forks for 20-inch rims are not popular. In complete ignorance I bought the fork, after looking for some days...the Jr part was not so evident and why I figure to replace springs. Only one avail at time and I know it is not the best.

    If I cannot replace stock fork, I can live with it...but should be replacements made by someone...SR Suntour say only one spring avail for that fork...not gonna say what else may fit.

    I thought to add very small electric hub motor to front 406 wheel for the hill climb. Powered ride is better with suspension fork.

    There are some 5 lb freewheeling hubs that one can buy laced to fit 406.
    Name:  minimumClearance.jpg
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    Stock tires are 1.5. I replace rear with 1.75 Schwalbe...ride is fine.

    I ride pavement for goofing mostly, and folder makes is easy to haul around in back of car. Geometry of the Swift matches that of 26-inch Mtb...so riding it is close to stock bike, and easily fits commuter category...or pleasure use. The 100 mm front and the narrow seat stays preclude tires larger than 1.75, without adding link to chain and resetting axle position. 2-inch is max anyway.

    The idea of stiffer springs seemed easy fix, but like I said, I am clueless.


    I used to ride my trail bikes in the city all the time and hit stair sets, wall drops and whatnot left and right. So do lots of people; the versatility of an mtb is perfect for that sort of riding. I don't see why some people are making a big ****ing deal about it.

    A fat bike would suck for what the OP is doing, but I understand that when you buy one, you have to sign an agreement that says you promise to mention it at least a dozen times a day.[/QUOTE]
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