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  1. #1
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    A messenger bag will be the same. It still covers a large portion of your back.

    Really, the only thing a messenger bag offers is the ability to access the contents of the bag without taking it off of your back.

  2. #2
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    Backpack vs messenger bag vs pannier

    I am currently commuting to work with a back pack and not looking the hot sweaty back. Will a messenger bag be just as hot and sweaty? I do not want to add a rack and pannier to my bike but probably will if messenger bag is about the same as a back pack.

  3. #3
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    Try a backpack with a taut mesh back that keeps an airspace between the pack and your back. Mine is so noticeable that this winter I considered blocking the mesh with a piece of fleece or something to block the cold wind. I like my Osprey Manta with the Airspeed back (not all the Ospreys have this feature).

  4. #4
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    I think a messenger bag is an improvement over a backpack. I wear mine lower than I wear a backpack. It depends on the bag, but the Timbuk2s, up through the large, are stable that way.

    Panniers are a big improvement over either for a longer or more heavily laden commute, though. It feels so awesome to ride without a load on my back if I've been using the messenger bag for a while.
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  5. #5
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    Getting a pannier changed my commute significantly.

    The difference:

    I used to wake up in the morning, load the backpack, say "screw it", jump in the shower and drive to work.

    Now I get up, pack the pannier, put it on the bike and go. No more ridiculously sweaty back, hip pain, etc. I love it.
    :wq

  6. #6
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    I use a BoB Trailer, love it.

    Monday I bring 5 days worth of clothes, keep the trailer at work and tow it all home on Friday.

  7. #7
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    Put the load on the bike... not on your body. Make your mule do the work!

    If you're going to be carrying stuff on your bike on any kind of regular basis, your best investment is a decent cargo rack and a set of panniers.

    Backpacks and messenger bags perform about the same function. The only real differerence between the two is the degree of personal comfort and convenience. In addition to the "sweaty back" syndrome, both of these methods raise your center of gravity, which affects your stability and the way the bike handles. Putting the weight lower, on the bike frame, not only takes the load off you, but also lowers your CG, making you more stable on the bike.
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  8. #8
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    Panniers are definitely the way to go. I didn't want to mess up any of my good bikes with a rack, so I went to my local bike co-op and picked up a 1972 Schwinn and set it up as a singlespeed for commuting. (Cleveland is seriously flat.) With the rack and the bags included, the whole deal was 100 bucks. Fenders were another 30, but totally worth it.

  9. #9
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    I switched from panniers to a pack around '99. I prefer the pack for loads under 12 lbs. Heavier than that and I hook up the trailer.

    I'm definitely in the minority in this regard..
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  10. #10
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    I have used everything from an Xtracycle, to Panniers, to all sorts of different backpacks/messenger packs.

    I believe they all have their uses. In fact, since I'm car-free now, I'm going to be building up another Xtracycle soon.

    However, I virtually live out of my Chrome Kremlin messenger bag right now. 3 times this month, I was able to haul 45 lbs worth of groceries home from the store.
    The construction on most high-end messenger bags is what sets them apart, they are designed to haul ridiculous loads without ripping or breaking.

    Hauling it on the bike is still preferable though. I might also pick up a BOB trailer as well...

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    I switched from panniers to a pack around '99. I prefer the pack for loads under 12 lbs. Heavier than that and I hook up the trailer.

    I'm definitely in the minority in this regard..
    Minority +1

    I carry up to 40lbs in my back pack. The bike is always quick and nibble under my legs. It never feels like a 50lbs commuter.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by PscyclePath View Post
    Put the load on the bike... not on your body. Make your mule do the work!
    I have always thought the opposite. I rather have the load on me and the bike be light so it doesn't slow me down. Especially if your commute is like mine where occasionally you have to hop over a curb, pothole, etc.

    I use a Chrome messenger bag. I can carry just about anything in it with no discomfort.

  13. #13
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    What about a man satchel?

  14. #14
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    I think a backpack is most comfortable.

  15. #15
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    Speaking to messenger vs backpack, you'll want to think about one shoulder vs two. So part of it also depends on the weight of the load and how long you'll have it on you. If you have a lighter load and/or shorter commute, putting the load on one shoulder might be OK for you. Personally I prefer spreading my commute load over two shoulders for the duration of my ride. With panniers that issue is kinda moot, as you'll have to consider a different set of issues (ie nimble bike vs nimble torso).

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by TLO View Post
    Minority +1

    I carry up to 40lbs in my back pack. The bike is always quick and nibble under my legs. It never feels like a 50lbs commuter.
    Same here. I use a Vaude Splash Air 20+5, it does everything I need it to.

    I also went this route because I like the bike to be quick and nimble.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by biketech4051 View Post
    try running panniers for a month with rear luggage racks and you will never ever go back to backpacks.
    I did. Back to a messenger bag, anyway. Now I decide based on how far I'm going, what I'm doing when I get there, and how much stuff I have to take with me.
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  18. #18
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    First.. I used a cheap computer shoulder bag.. almost like messenger bag..with no waist strap. Didn't like it all.. every-time I stopped, the bag would move across my body... sometimes hitting my arm.

    Next I got.. fairly inexpensive North Face messenger bag.. (it was about $30) It had a waist strap.. so I liked it a lot. I was able to have the weight a lot lower on my body. I was riding a very stiff early 90s Cannondale road bike. I commuted on and off.. mostly on sunny days with this set up.

    But.. I wanted to commute every day.. rain or shine.. (Battle of the waist.. that I'm now winning) So, in early May I built up a Surly LHT. I tend to carry a lot of stuff in my bag and a full change of clothes.. so I bought a good Tubus rack and Otlieb panniers... to go along with my new LHT With using one pannier.... I have enough room to leave my raincoat and overboots on the bottom. I commute an hour and twenty minutes each way to work. Comparing my quick light road bike using a messenger bag to my tank like Surly LHT with a rack and pannier... the slow Surly wins out. The most important thing is that I feel refreshed, no back or shoulder pain. Also.. the rack comes in handy.. I can stop by at Cosco on my way home and do some errands for my wife.
    Last edited by MichaelinOsaka; 07-14-2011 at 04:42 AM.

  19. #19
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    i have the same Q so thanks alot for all replies!

  20. #20
    jrm
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    Anyone tried a frame bag

    Like they use in the huge enduro events that fit in the front triangle? i use a deuter 28AC pack that i like a lot bu the longer i go or the more i climb with the pack on my back the worst the pack feels.

    Ive gotten to the point where ill leave stuff at work to lighten the pack a bit or just leave the pack and all my stuff at work. I wouldnt mind carrying stuff on the frame though. Something like this

    <img src=https://www.jandd.com/ProdImages/BicycleSeatBagsFramePacks/FramePack/FramePac.jpg>
    Last edited by jrm; 07-14-2011 at 10:29 AM. Reason: add pic

  21. #21
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    It's worthy to note a lot of the newer messenger bags are backpack styled. If I was in a market for a new one, I'd look at one of those (like the Chrome Yalta). I don't mean to plug Chrome so much, but in my experience with messenger bags, the quality and stiching (not to mention comfort) of their bags is barnone as compared to others IMO.

  22. #22
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    Ortlieb roll top back pack. It has a foam back with air channels. If you want a no sweat back I would not get a mess. bag. I use one( Seagull) but only because I don't care about a sweaty back. If my load is small I use my Mesa Runner lumbar pack. Touring? I have Ortlieb panniers on a Tubus rack.
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  23. #23
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    Backpack all the way!

  24. #24
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    At least on a nice hot day in Georgia, riding with a backpack isn't comfortable. When it's hot out or you have an extended ride, panniers really are the answer. You can fit a lot more on two loaded panniers and a rack, than you can comfortably in a backpack.

    And I have to seriously doubt the claims about the vented back panels. While I haven't tried all of the different brands, my Camelbak Mule N.V. makes very little difference in the sweatiness of my back. You can feel a light breeze every so often, but it's definitely not a 'no sweat ride'.

  25. #25
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    saddlebag ftw

    i've got a carradice nelson longflap for commuting, use it for touring as well. i've tried backpacks and messenger bags too. i also own a set of bikepacking adventure bags from revelate designs and a small set of ortlieb panniers. for me the panniers actually work best in the rain since they're the most waterproof. i love the simplicity and old school looks of the carradice saddlebag. depending on your destination all work real well, once you really start heading off road w/gear is when you can figure out what works/feels best.

  26. #26
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    I like my old Chrome Metropolis a LOT.

    Other days, I'll use a Miltary/Tactical backpack....I have many.

    Think I was 'born with a pack on my back' I hardly ever am without a pack on my back of some sort...I just don't stuff in my pockets and like to carry my EDC stuff around.

    Basically, I also know I'm in the minortiy...but I like all my stuff "on me" - and I'm used to the heft. Sorta comforting actually.

  27. #27
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    If a sweaty back is your problem then I'd recommend both Ortlieb and SealLine because they have back padding designed with channeling air through in mind. I personally own a SealLine messenger style bag that I'm very impressed with for its build quality, weight(for its level of durability) and comfort. For a commuter bag it is tough to beat because its also waterproof with stitching replaced with RF welds( like its laminated together). I recently upgraded to a Pac Ultimate I've been lusting after only because the large SealLine , while great for commuting and most trips just wasn't big enough for groceries and multi-day trips.

  28. #28
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    Osprey makes some pretty cool options as far as packs go. That's about as much ventilation as you're gonna get from anybody. But any pack is going to make you hotter than not wearing a pack. In my opinion, panniers are the way to go if you're trying to stay dry.
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  29. #29
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    I am planning on trying a frame bag next. Just not sure how affected I will be in a side wind.. Something like this:


  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasevr4 View Post
    I am planning on trying a frame bag next. Just not sure how affected I will be in a side wind.. Something like this:
    I have never seen this idea before, looks like it would be a sail in the slightest of side winds. If anyone has any experience with these, it would be interesting to hear how well they work.

    Personally, I would love to have panniers but my old commuter lacks the eyelets for the rack. I have converted an old MTB camlebak into my everyday bag which seems to get the job done.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mooskit View Post
    I have never seen this idea before, looks like it would be a sail in the slightest of side winds. If anyone has any experience with these, it would be interesting to hear how well they work.
    That what I thought at first, but then with the same theory, panniers would be like that too and plenty of people use them. At least these are central - it may give more control?

  32. #32
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    In frame bags look handy, especially on a bike that big! ^

    Its all trial and error. I started with a backpack, went messenger bag, then panniers, now back to a back pack (Osprey Talon 22...very nice bag!). Its hot here, so I am gonna sweat no matter what. I like the pannier for heavier stuff, like my laptop, but hardly ever bring that home these days, so the back pack wins most of the time.

  33. #33
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    I commute using a small cycling-specific Novara backpack that I've had for ~4 years and love it. I've never had a sweaty back from the pack. It starts to get uncomfortable when I pack in my 16" laptop in addition to the usual books and stuff.

    I also have a full set of 4 Ortlieb panniers which I use for touring and hauling groceries. However, every time I ride to the grocery store I feel really nervous leaving them on my locked bike when I go into the store. Anyone have any good methods to keep your panniers from getting swiped? Of course I could get a small cable and lock them up, or just bring them into the store with me, but if anyone has any creative ways of keeping their bags safe I'd love to know!

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasevr4 View Post
    I am planning on trying a frame bag next. Just not sure how affected I will be in a side wind.. Something like this:

    Frame bags are a great way to use unused space on the bike, and also keeps the bike "skinnier" than panniers for aero or trail clearance. But most commuters want to grab their stuff off the bike upon arrival, and they don't seem very convenient for that. I have a small one from Jannd, it was nice on my camping trip, but not big enough to worry about the crosswind question. I thought a frame bag might be a good place for emergency stuff in winter, like a compact down jacket, but I think mine is too small and it's been to warm to worry about.

  35. #35
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    North Face Slingshot backpack here. I don't 'get' messenger bags. I've tried a couple, and anything I have to think about that much while I'm riding just isn't worth it. Maybe I was doing it wrong...

    I wanted a frame bag when I was touring, but I also wanted water bottles in a reachable spot. I guess that wouldn't matter much on the commute though.
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  36. #36
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    I must not be doing it right either....

    I don't use a bag

    The stuff at work stays at work and the stuff at home stays at home.

    You can get stuff cleaned downtown.

  37. #37
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    I used both a backpack and pannier bags, and my definite choice is the pannier bags. So much more convenient that way, in addition to my back not sweating as much as it does with a backpack on.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuterBoy View Post
    I wanted a frame bag when I was touring, but I also wanted water bottles in a reachable spot. I guess that wouldn't matter much on the commute though.
    My tentative plan for touring is a frame bag and bottle holders on the front forks.

  39. #39
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    ^^Another option for bikepacking is putting a hydration pack in the framebag with the tube sticking out.

    For commuting I still love my Osprey Manta pack. Super comfy & well made, has stood up even though I often stuff in 1 more thing.. But I only use the hydration reservoir part for longer hikes & bikes. One bottle has been enough for my commute.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    ^^Another option for bikepacking is putting a hydration pack in the framebag with the tube sticking out.
    Good thinking!

  41. #41
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    https://www.revelatedesigns.com/inde...=1&ProductID=5
    I use a tangle bag for most everything it's larger then the Jandd bag and I think slightly better quality. Unfortunately Revelate does not do custom bags anymore ever since signing up with Salsa. I also have a seatpost rack that has a Lezyne cabby pannier which is light and easy to take on and off.

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  42. #42
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    hmmmm, its so hard to choose. for long trip, i choose pannier, for easy ride just only riding around a town, i choose backpack.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by TLO View Post
    Minority +1

    I carry up to 40lbs in my back pack. The bike is always quick and nibble under my legs. It never feels like a 50lbs commuter.
    I have to agree. Panniers make my bike feel like a dog. If I can get away with a backpack under 2000 cubic inches, I do it.

    I use panniers strictly for grocery shopping, and longer trips with my daughter on the trailer bike.

    Messenger bags have never agreed with me. I felt like I was being strangled, and packed items always felt like they were sticking me in the back.

    I use a Dakine Apex backpack. Adequate ventilation, and can carry some really odd sized loads. It'll even accommodate a hydration bladder.

  44. #44
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    I have been using my wife's old black Jansport for the last few weeks. While it works and is super light it does not have enough room when I try and pack riding clothes in there as well. I have multiple groups that we go on rides during our lunches with so panniers or frame bags are out of the question.

    Those that use messengers, what size do you use? I normally pack a pair of casual/work shoes, riding shorts, jersey, wool base layer, thing over jacket and sometimes my helmet. I have been looking at the Timbuk2 Classic Messengers but wondering what size I should get (thinking either medium or large).

    Thoughts on the size of bag for riding clothes, helmet, and shoes plus little stuff?

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregnash View Post
    I have been using my wife's old black Jansport for the last few weeks. While it works and is super light it does not have enough room when I try and pack riding clothes in there as well. I have multiple groups that we go on rides during our lunches with so panniers or frame bags are out of the question.

    Those that use messengers, what size do you use? I normally pack a pair of casual/work shoes, riding shorts, jersey, wool base layer, thing over jacket and sometimes my helmet. I have been looking at the Timbuk2 Classic Messengers but wondering what size I should get (thinking either medium or large).

    Thoughts on the size of bag for riding clothes, helmet, and shoes plus little stuff?
    I have a Timbuk2 size large. I also have an XL; I found it unmanageable. Great size for skiing or as a gear bag to take to a race, though. And I had a medium for a while, but especially if you get the compression straps, the large is as easy to own and it fits more stuff.

    Shoes and helmets are tough. I think you could get all the stuff on your list plus either shoes OR helmet. I've generally found it more practical to clip the helmet to the outside. When I have a period of working the same place every day, I leave a fair amount of stuff there. For example, over the summer I left my shoes and a sweater at work and rode in in whatever combination of riding and work clothes seemed convenient at the time, with the rest of a work outfit and my lunch in my bag. Days that I was going straight to training after work, I also took the rest of a complete cycling outfit.

    I have to say that I can't tell if one of my road bikes also has a rack on it, as long as there's nothing actually attached to the rack. If your lunchtime rides are on pavement, I don't see that as ruling out the rack and pannier - just don't give up your wedge bag or however you carry your tools, and leave your pannier at work. I also had one on my bike most of the time when I first learned to mountain bike, although the fashion victim in me would probably have more trouble with it now. (And that was when dinosaurs ruled the Earth and disc brakes were for cars and motorcycles.)
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  46. #46
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    Well normally the only time I have the shoes AND helmet in the bag is if my wife insists on taking me to work "because it's to damn cold." If I can clip the helmet to the outside easily and without it flapping around like a rutard then that would be great.

    So Timbuk2 is doing a 20% off sale on all custom bags that ends today is why I am asking. I am debating on breaking the old CC out to get one or just suffer with what I have for now. I do have a much larger JanSport Sport Pack with the honeycomb shoulder pads that I might have to break out of dog haul duty for a bit.

  47. #47
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    I like my messenger bag a lot better. The shoulder strap and diagonal stabilizer strap do a better job keeping it stable and I can wear it lower, which I also prefer. When I wore backpacks, I always found that they'd shift to the side, which was incredibly annoying. Counterintuitive, but there you go.

    Whether Timbuk2 specifically is the best choice, I dunno. I know there were other brands when I got my first, but I don't think I knew it at the time. I finally damaged it and got it replaced on warranty. This more recent bag hasn't been doing as well - there's some damage to the lining, and it's only a couple years old.

    So - I think messenger bags are a pretty good way to carry my stuff, I think the size large Timbuk2 or other brand's equivalent size is a good size, I dunno if Timbuk2's the best choice of brand anymore. It's discussed pretty frequently, so do a search.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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