Backpack on my rack?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Backpack on my rack?

    I just installed a rack for my bike and wondering the best way to carry my backpack on there or if it's even a good idea. I contemplated using ratchet straps, but it's a bit ridiculous due to the weight of the mechanical portion and the fact that my straps are 20 ft long and have a 3000lb capacity.

    Are these type of straps a good idea?

    https://www.altrec.com/outdoor-resea...cessory-straps

  2. #2
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    Milk crate on the rack is probably the easiest, but not necessary the most stylish (although it offers a ton of real estate for lights and reflecto-bits!).

    I'd suggest Surly Junk Straps instead, quite versatile, as demonstrated here:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OblcXzzPry8
    Jason
    Disclaimer: www.paramountfargo.com

  3. #3
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    I use a small rope criss-crossed over the backpack to hold it in place creating a sort of "X" pattern across the top and tie it off. I had trouble getting bungies and straps tight enough. I carry a work laptop in my bag so I wanted to be sure it is secure. It has worked well so far (maybe 40+ rides).

  4. #4
    weirdo
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    ^ +1 on the small rope.
    I prefer clothes line to bungies or straps. IMO, it`s more versatile, more compact, and cheaper. I always carry a couple of short pieces and a couple of long pieces (roughly 16 in and 24 in) in my underseat bag. When I lose one, donate one, or one wears out, I just cut a replacement from the coil at home. For only a backpack, one of those cargo nets would probably be a little bit quicker to deploy, though.

    If you`re carrying a backpack on a rack, don`t forget to tie up all the straps and strap tails so they don`t get caught on anything.

  5. #5
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Purpose-built panniers are pretty great, if they make sense for the rest of your day. A little more expensive, though.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  6. #6
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    I use a hybridbackpack to carry my backpack.

  7. #7
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    I use a hybridbackpack to carry my backpack. It works really good. It was design so that you can take your backpack. I have a review of it on my youtube channel.
    And I use it to carry a case of beer. I's uses are limitless if you check their website.

    http://www.youtube.com/user/bobbisig...r?feature=mhee

  8. #8
    dirtbag
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    Mount a wire basket or milk/beer crate on top of your rack. Throw you backpack in the rack. Easy on of off.
    Amolan

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ranier View Post
    Mount a wire basket or milk/beer crate on top of your rack. Throw you backpack in the rack. Easy on of off.
    These might be impractical since I have to put my bike in a locker at work. The locker is rectangular but divided diagonally to fit one bike on either side. The only way I can even fit my bike is with the front wheel turned on way or the other because even the widest part is too narrow for my bars to go across. Well, that and my pedals catch both walls at the point where half the front wheel is still sticking out the front door.

  10. #10
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I had some collapsible wire baskets (made by Wald) on my commuter for a while.

    Ultimately I ended up removing them. In order to have clearance for my heel, I had to put them pretty far back and they caused more tail whip than I found acceptable. The convenience was pretty sweet though, and they added almost no width to my rack when folded. I might try them again if I built a commuter on a purpose-built touring frame or a hybrid.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobbisighncommuter View Post
    I use a hybridbackpack to carry my backpack. It works really good. It was design so that you can take your backpack. I have a review of it on my youtube channel.
    And I use it to carry a case of beer. I's uses are limitless if you check their website.

    http://www.youtube.com/user/bobbisig...r?feature=mhee
    This thing looks interesting though.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    I had some collapsible wire baskets (made by Wald) on my commuter for a while.

    Ultimately I ended up removing them. In order to have clearance for my heel, I had to put them pretty far back and they caused more tail whip than I found acceptable. The convenience was pretty sweet though, and they added almost no width to my rack when folded. I might try them again if I built a commuter on a purpose-built touring frame or a hybrid.
    What difference would a touring or hybrid frame make compared to what you are riding now? I have a hybrid or "urban" bike that's closer to a rigid mountain bike.

  13. #13
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Quote Originally Posted by jseko View Post
    What difference would a touring or hybrid frame make compared to what you are riding now? I have a hybrid or "urban" bike that's closer to a rigid mountain bike.
    Chainstay length. Loads that are forward of the rear hub don't effect the handling of a bike all that much. Whether fore or aft of the rear hub, a load will want to keep doing whatever it's doing - heading down a hill, heading in the direction tangential to a turn, rotating, etc. But they get harder to manage the further back they are. A touring or hybrid frame would move the rear wheel back relative to the bottom bracket, so without moving my wire baskets or a pannier forward relative to the crank - unacceptable because I already put them as forward as I can without heel strike - the load is further forward relative to the hub.

    Performance-oriented bikes tend to have the shortest chainstays possible, for stiffness and quicker handling. I have to say that the first is a little dubious, at least for those of us who will wake up in the morning and still not be Mark Cavendish.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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