Back to commuting....- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Back to commuting....

    For the passed 5 years or so I have been so fortunate as to live 1 mile away from my jobs... I commuted to work by bike for the first three then went back to driving.

    I now work the night shift at a nursing home, you guessed it, 1 mile away from home. A close family friend of my father's was so nice as to give me 4 old touring/road bikes all 27". So an old motobecane mixte has been cleaned up and setup for my cousin who also mtbs with me, a fuji for me to road ride as well as tool around on smooth trails. Then an old general tourney converted to single speed just to mess around with.

    Now on to the commuter, it is a panasonic sport 500, I amgoingto single speed it but it has a bent steel fork that I straightened as best I could and I need to put a front brake on since I had none.

    Is straightening a curved blade steel fork a good idea?

    O yeah I'll post pics when I get off work later today.
    SS Rigid =
    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]
    There is no distraction. You only hear the sound of your breath and the crunch of the wheels across the dirt.

  2. #2
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    4 bikes for free? Sounds like you got a good deal, Ricot. As long as the fork blade isn`t kinked, you should be okay straightening it by cold bending (just don`t take a torch to it). Getting it nice and straight will be kind of tricky without fancy toys, but for what you`re talking about, you ought to be able to eyeball it close enough.
    Recalculating....

  3. #3
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    He'sa good friend and I normaly repair old junk bikes for him to sell cheap. I also gave him a a new condition trek 820 that he sold same day.
    Anyway I figured I would use the roughest bike to start commuting with. I straightened the fork th best I could
    SS Rigid =
    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]
    There is no distraction. You only hear the sound of your breath and the crunch of the wheels across the dirt.

  4. #4
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    Here they are
    fuji gran tourer.


    motobecane mixte


    general tourney


    panasonic sport 500


    they will probably all be ss at one point or another
    SS Rigid =
    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]
    There is no distraction. You only hear the sound of your breath and the crunch of the wheels across the dirt.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BrianMc's Avatar
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    Nice haul. I own and run two classics.

    Bent fork cold setting. I have done so with no ill effects (yet).

    For those onterested, this is what I did for my bent steel fork. NEVER try this on anything BUT a steel fork, and note that it is neither recommended nor advised against even for a steel fork:

    I thoroughly inspected my fork blades to make sure that they were not bent out or in sideways, showed torn or folded steel. I checked for cracked or wrinkled paint that might be buckled or cracked metal particularly near the crown and where the sweep of the fork towards the wheel starts. If any of these were present, I would have replaced the fork.

    I was lucky. I found no obvious signs of deformed or cracked steel. There could still be cracks, but steel tends to fail slowly and I am keeping a watch.

    With the bike on its back on the floor (I have no bike stand) I placed a long bolt into the fork dropouts so it rested on the top (now bottom) of both dropout slots. This bolt will be exactly parallel with the fork crown IF the fork blades are in line. I had a 1 cm displacement. I'd replace a fork with more than 2 cm displacement.

    With the fork removed and firmly in the wood lined jaws of a vise, I used a wooden lever like a 2" x 4" (in metric 37 mm x 87 mm) about a meter long, made of softwood that wouldn't scratch the paint. It was placed to push back on the crook of the leading blade and forward on the trailing one. The fork's blades sprang back after each time they were moved by the lever and the lever released. So the process was repeated and checked, until a bolt lying in the dropouts lined up parallel to the crown. The fork blades are then even front to back and I next checked the fork ends for alignment.

    My backyard method for fork end alignment (since I don't have the Park or Campagnolo tools), was two bolts with two nuts and washers each. Each bolt went in each dropout so that the treaded bolt ends touched in the middle and each bolt was held by its own nut-washer-dropout-washer-nut 'sandwich'. The dropouts were not in line, and the bolts were not straight like a single axle. They formed a shallow 'vee'. I compared each bolt to the crown to determine whether one, or both bolts were parallel to the crown, and so whether one or both dropouts needed to be turned to make the bolts as if they were one. I made notes as to which end needed how much and in which way. With the alignment tool-bolts removed, a large adjustable wrench adjusted down to hold the fork ends in its jaws and allowed the dropout to be twisted. This is done a little bit, then rechecked with the bolts until the bolts are in line, as stated above. I then mounted a trued front wheel (the original in a bent fork is suspect, and needs to be checked) in the fork while it is in the vise with the axle just resting on the top (currently bottom) of the dropouts. It was centered side to side in the fork, near the crown. If not, the fork is bent sideways and it's replacement time.

    Front alignment can be tricky and the first test rides need to be done with care to make sure the bike is handling and steering correctly. Don't forget to make sure the wheel is firmly attached and brakes working properly before the test ride. It is surprisingly easy to get excited and ahead of yourself and the result of forgetting is often unpleasant.

  6. #6
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    I straightened it best I could but, I think I will take the general's fork and swap
    them then use the general for commuting instead since it is a crappier bike and I wanna use it for tolling around.
    SS Rigid =
    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]
    There is no distraction. You only hear the sound of your breath and the crunch of the wheels across the dirt.

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